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  • odst@yahoogroups.com
    Shoulder Injury Prevention Presented by USA Swimming and the Network Task Force on Injury Prevention. (April 2002) A series of exercises for the UN-injured
    Message 1 of 32 , Sep 1, 2010
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      Shoulder Injury Prevention
      Presented by USA Swimming and the Network Task Force on Injury Prevention.
      (April 2002)

      A series of exercises for the UN-injured athlete.

      Pain in the shoulder is common in swimmers. Shoulder function is highly
      dependent on the coordinated function of many muscle groups. These include
      the muscles around the shoulder, those that control the scapula or shoulder
      blade, muscles in the upper and lower back, as well as abdominal and pelvic
      muscles.

      Since the shoulder is an inherently unstable joint, muscle forces are
      critical for maintaining stability, proper motion, and painless function.
      The repetitive overhead activity of the swimming stroke can result in
      fatigue of these muscles. This in turn can lead to distinct changes in the
      function of the shoulder, resulting in the pain that is commonly known as
      �swimmer�s shoulder�.

      One of the major factors causing shoulder pain is overuse and subsequent
      fatigue of the rotator cuff muscles, scapular muscles, and muscles of the
      upper and lower back. Consequently, this fatigue can lead to shoulder
      instability and predispose a swimmer to shoulder pain. The risk of injury
      and pain is especially true for swimmers who swim with poor technique.

      It is well-established that a comprehensive program to develop strength,
      endurance, balance, and flexibility of the muscles is the most important way
      to prevent �swimmer�s shoulder". The exercises described in this review were
      chosen to develop these characteristics based on a sound knowledge of the
      muscles that are most important for optimal shoulder function.

      THE EXERCISES:
      http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/ViewMiscArticle.aspx?TabId=445&Alias=Rain
      bow&Lang=en&mid=702&ItemId=700
    • odst@yahoogroups.com
      Shoulder Injury Prevention Presented by USA Swimming and the Network Task Force on Injury Prevention. (April 2002) A series of exercises for the UN-injured
      Message 32 of 32 , Mar 1 1:11 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Shoulder Injury Prevention
        Presented by USA Swimming and the Network Task Force on Injury Prevention.
        (April 2002)

        A series of exercises for the UN-injured athlete.

        Pain in the shoulder is common in swimmers. Shoulder function is highly
        dependent on the coordinated function of many muscle groups. These include
        the muscles around the shoulder, those that control the scapula or shoulder
        blade, muscles in the upper and lower back, as well as abdominal and pelvic
        muscles.

        Since the shoulder is an inherently unstable joint, muscle forces are
        critical for maintaining stability, proper motion, and painless function.
        The repetitive overhead activity of the swimming stroke can result in
        fatigue of these muscles. This in turn can lead to distinct changes in the
        function of the shoulder, resulting in the pain that is commonly known as
        �swimmer�s shoulder�.

        One of the major factors causing shoulder pain is overuse and subsequent
        fatigue of the rotator cuff muscles, scapular muscles, and muscles of the
        upper and lower back. Consequently, this fatigue can lead to shoulder
        instability and predispose a swimmer to shoulder pain. The risk of injury
        and pain is especially true for swimmers who swim with poor technique.

        It is well-established that a comprehensive program to develop strength,
        endurance, balance, and flexibility of the muscles is the most important way
        to prevent �swimmer�s shoulder". The exercises described in this review were
        chosen to develop these characteristics based on a sound knowledge of the
        muscles that are most important for optimal shoulder function.

        THE EXERCISES AND FULL ARTICLE:
        http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewMiscArticle.aspx?TabId=1645&Alias=Rainbow&Lang=en&mid=702&ItemId=700
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