Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

ARCHETYPES

Expand Messages
  • Paulo
    Archetype [Wikipedia] An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; a
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 17, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Archetype

      [Wikipedia]


      An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; a symbol universally recognized by all. In psychology, an archetype is a model of a person, personality, or behavior.

      In philosophy, archetypes since Plato at least, refer to ideal forms of the perceived or sensible things or types.

      In the analysis of personality, the term archetype is often broadly used to refer to

      1.a stereotype—personality type observed multiple times, especially an oversimplification of such a type,
      2.an epitome—personality type exemplified, especially the "greatest" such example, or
      3.a literary term to express details.
      Archetype refers to a generic version of a personality. In this sense "mother figure" may be considered an archetype and may be identified in various characters with otherwise distinct (non-generic) personalities.

      Archetypes are likewise supposed to have been present in folklore and literature for thousands of years, including prehistoric artwork. The use of archetypes to illuminate personality and literature was advanced by Carl Jung early in the 20th century, who suggested the existence of universal contentless forms that channel experiences and emotions, resulting in recognizable and typical patterns of behavior with certain probable outcomes. Archetypes are cited as important to both ancient mythology and modern narratives.

      Origins
      The origins of the archetypal hypothesis date back as far as Plato. Jung himself compared archetypes to Platonic ideas. Plato's ideas were pure mental forms, that were imprinted in the soul before it was born into the world. They were collective in the sense that they embodied the fundamental characteristics of a thing rather than its specific peculiarities.

      Jungian archetypes

      The concept of psychological archetypes was advanced by the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, c. 1919. In Jung's psychological framework archetypes are innate, universal prototypes for ideas and may be used to interpret observations. A group of memories and interpretations associated with an archetype is a complex, e.g. a mother complex associated with the mother archetype. Jung treated the archetypes as psychological organs, analogous to physical ones in that both are morphological constructs that arose through evolution.[6]

      Jung outlined five main archetypes;

      The Self, the regulating center of the psyche and facilitator of individuation
      The Shadow, the opposite of the ego image, often containing qualities that the ego does not identify with but possesses nonetheless
      The Anima, the feminine image in a man's psyche; or:
      The Animus, the masculine image in a woman's psyche
      The Persona, how we present to the world, is another of 'the subpersonalities, the complexes'[7] and usually protects the Ego from negative images (acts like a mask)
      Although archetypes can take on innumerable forms, there are a few particularly notable, recurring archetypal images:

      The Child
      The Hero
      The Great Mother
      The Wise old man or Sage
      The Wise Old Woman/Man, archetypes of the collective unconscious
      The Trickster or Fox
      The Devil or Satan
      The Scarecrow
      The Mentor
      Jung also outlined what he called archetypes of transformation. Not personality constructs, they are situations, places, ways and means that symbolize the transformation in question (CW9i:81). These archetypes exist primarily as energy - and are useful in organizational development, personal and organizational change management, and extensively used in place branding. As with any archetype, image takes priority over language. In a personal exploration of the Self, archetypes play an important role in the process of individuation.
    • Paulo
      Hi. ... paulo dias=
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 19, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi.

        >
        > Jung outlined five main archetypes;
        >
        > The Self, the regulating center of the psyche and facilitator of individuation
        > The Shadow, the opposite of the ego image, often containing qualities that the ego does not identify with but possesses nonetheless
        > The Anima, the feminine image in a man's psyche; or:
        > The Animus, the masculine image in a woman's psyche
        > The Persona, how we present to the world, is another of 'the subpersonalities, the complexes'[7] and usually protects the Ego from negative images (acts like a mask)

        Mediumship happen inside the archetypes, specially these:

        > Although archetypes can take on innumerable forms, there are a few particularly notable, recurring archetypal images:
        >
        > The Child
        > The Hero
        > The Great Mother
        > The Wise old man or Sage
        > The Wise Old Woman/Man, archetypes of the collective unconscious
        > The Trickster or Fox
        > The Devil or Satan
        > The Scarecrow
        > The Mentor

        paulo dias=
      • Paulo
        Hi. ... or ... Mediumship is receiving mind messages from deads (living deads!) and so, it s necessary we being in a special (archetypical) state of mind
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 22, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi.

          >
          > Mediumship happen inside the archetypes
          >>

          ...inside, we need actual archetypes for mediumship, for example:


          > > The Self, the regulating center of the psyche and facilitator of individuation

          or

          > >
          > > The Mentor

          Mediumship is receiving mind messages from "deads" (living deads!) and so, it's necessary we being in a special (archetypical) state of mind wich can accept this message because consciousd thougth usually rejects that.

          paulo dias=
        • Paulo
          Hi. Mediumship is the ability for receiving mindal or telepathic messsages from persons who lived in Earth some day, in fact, deads still living as Spirits.
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 24, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi.

            Mediumship is the ability for receiving mindal or telepathic messsages from persons who lived in Earth some day, in fact, "deads" still living as Spirits.

            For that, the Spirit is, at first, an archetype of the medium, an ideal model of personality, one who he "want to be" in this moment or, the medium and the Spirit identify one to other in a common state of mind and then, the medium is conscious a half of himself, a half of the Spirits thougth.

            But, archetypes are psychic events and Spirits are persons. Free people out of body, and they give proofs of their own passed personality while themselves now exist in other level, because that they act many times as the Self or the Mentor, the archetipes regulating the psyche centers, and the individuation.

            paulo dias=

            **********************
            >
            > Archetype
            >
            > [Wikipedia]
            >
            >
            > An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; a symbol universally recognized by all. In psychology, an archetype is a model of a person, personality, or behavior.
            >
            > In philosophy, archetypes since Plato at least, refer to ideal forms of the perceived or sensible things or types.
            >
            > In the analysis of personality, the term archetype is often broadly used to refer to
            >
            > 1.a stereotype—personality type observed multiple times, especially an oversimplification of such a type,
            > 2.an epitome—personality type exemplified, especially the "greatest" such example, or
            > 3.a literary term to express details.
            > Archetype refers to a generic version of a personality. In this sense "mother figure" may be considered an archetype and may be identified in various characters with otherwise distinct (non-generic) personalities.
            >
            > Archetypes are likewise supposed to have been present in folklore and literature for thousands of years, including prehistoric artwork. The use of archetypes to illuminate personality and literature was advanced by Carl Jung early in the 20th century, who suggested the existence of universal contentless forms that channel experiences and emotions, resulting in recognizable and typical patterns of behavior with certain probable outcomes. Archetypes are cited as important to both ancient mythology and modern narratives.
            >
            > Origins
            > The origins of the archetypal hypothesis date back as far as Plato. Jung himself compared archetypes to Platonic ideas. Plato's ideas were pure mental forms, that were imprinted in the soul before it was born into the world. They were collective in the sense that they embodied the fundamental characteristics of a thing rather than its specific peculiarities.
            >
            > Jungian archetypes
            >
            > The concept of psychological archetypes was advanced by the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, c. 1919. In Jung's psychological framework archetypes are innate, universal prototypes for ideas and may be used to interpret observations. A group of memories and interpretations associated with an archetype is a complex, e.g. a mother complex associated with the mother archetype. Jung treated the archetypes as psychological organs, analogous to physical ones in that both are morphological constructs that arose through evolution.[6]
            >
            > Jung outlined five main archetypes;
            >
            > The Self, the regulating center of the psyche and facilitator of individuation
            > The Shadow, the opposite of the ego image, often containing qualities that the ego does not identify with but possesses nonetheless
            > The Anima, the feminine image in a man's psyche; or:
            > The Animus, the masculine image in a woman's psyche
            > The Persona, how we present to the world, is another of 'the subpersonalities, the complexes'[7] and usually protects the Ego from negative images (acts like a mask)
            > Although archetypes can take on innumerable forms, there are a few particularly notable, recurring archetypal images:
            >
            > The Child
            > The Hero
            > The Great Mother
            > The Wise old man or Sage
            > The Wise Old Woman/Man, archetypes of the collective unconscious
            > The Trickster or Fox
            > The Devil or Satan
            > The Scarecrow
            > The Mentor
            > Jung also outlined what he called archetypes of transformation. Not personality constructs, they are situations, places, ways and means that symbolize the transformation in question (CW9i:81). These archetypes exist primarily as energy - and are useful in organizational development, personal and organizational change management, and extensively used in place branding. As with any archetype, image takes priority over language. In a personal exploration of the Self, archetypes play an important role in the process of individuation.
            >
          • Paulo
            Hi. ... The Bible said, *Elohim bara* i.e., G-d always created, since every times and more, just now, because the archetype was (2000 years ago) the eternal
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 6, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi.

              > > In philosophy, archetypes since Plato at least, refer to ideal forms of the perceived or sensible things or types.
              > >
              > > In the analysis of personality, the term archetype is often broadly used to refer to
              > >
              > > 1.a stereotype—personality

              The Bible said, *Elohim bara* i.e., G-d always created, since every times and more, just now, because the archetype was (2000 years ago) the eternal ideas in the mind of G-d, or, the Now and the Here.

              There's no time in the human mind archetypes, too.

              paulo dias=
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.