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Re: "ocaml_beginners"::[] dot in OCaml syntax in Dynamic types

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  • Sergei Steshenko
    Thanks.
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 6, 2013
      Thanks.



      ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Esther Baruk <esther.baruk@...>
      > To: ocaml_beginners@yahoogroups.com
      > Cc:
      > Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 8:13 PM
      > Subject: Re: "ocaml_beginners"::[] dot in OCaml syntax in Dynamic types
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > It indicates that the function is polymorphic. It means : "for all type t,
      > the variantize function takes a value of type t ty and a value of type t
      > and returns a value of type variant."
      > It is explained here, as a recent language extension:
      > http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-ocaml/manual021.html#htoc107
      > In section 7.13 just below, there is the explanation of the "type t"
      > construct.
      >
      >
      > Esther Baruk
      >
      >
      > On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 6:39 PM, Sergei Steshenko
      > <sergstesh@...>wrote:
      >
      >> **
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Hello All,
      >>
      >> since I came to OCaml through Perl, I first of all want to have in OCaml
      >> what I enjoy in Perl, namely, hierarchical data structures.
      >>
      >> But, of course, Perl is not strictly typed while OCaml is.
      >>
      >> Trying to reinvent the wheel I came across "Dynamaic types" -
      >> http://www.lexifi.com/blog/dynamic-types . I think it's a really good
      >> beginning for what I want to achieve.
      >>
      >> In the web page I see the following pieces of code:
      >>
      >> let rec variantize: type t. t ty -> t -> variant =
      >> let rec devariantize: type t. t ty -> variant -> t =
      >> let rec variantize: type t. t ty -> t -> variant =
      >>
      >> .
      >>
      >> Pay attention there is dot after 't' in the lines of code above
      >>
      >> I am myself a RTFM saying person, so, do I guess correctly that I need to
      >> read chapters on OCaml OO in order to understand what the dot is ? Or
      > it's
      >> something more basic ?
      >>
      >> So, anyway, I'd like to be pointed to the appropriate web pages and
      > I'll
      >> go from there.
      >>
      >> Thanks,
      >>   Sergei.
      >>
      >>  
      >>
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
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