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July 1 vote

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  • Nancy Davies
    Fraud, of course. First, I went to my normal voting place. It had been moved, with two different signs designating two different but incorrect sites, all quite
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2012
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      Fraud, of course. First, I went to my normal voting place. It had been moved, with two different signs designating two different but incorrect sites, all quite close.  I discovered the actual functioning site merely by accident. I did manage to vote, and poll watchers  (one of them my neighbor) were efficient and kind.)

      Then we went down to the zocalo, and learned that  six special voting sites for people who found themselves out of district today, but wanted to vote, had been designated. However, no ballots were delivered to any of those six polling places. This leads one to suspect that the ballots will be marked somewhere by somebody and delivered to be counted, by-passing the voters. The voters in the zocalo, lined up for some time, accosted the federal electoral authority (Fepade) whofinally showed up and said there were no ballots. A small riot of a hundred or so irate citizens ensued, with would-be voters shouting Fraud! Fraud and the terrified Fepade guy running for shelter, pursued by a throng of Oaxacan citizens. The Fepade man ran into a restaurant on the west side of the zocalo, and the crowd followed, shouting at the entrance. The restaurants and businesses on both sides of the besieged restaurant rolled down their iron doors. The local police arrived and called for reinforcements. Soon armed state police showed up, and a helicopter circled. TV Azteca came when it was all over, but lots of local reporters were getting photos. No violence broke out, the Fepade man was escorted out. Show and tell....

      This is all pretty much for nothing. Here in Mexico fraud can be denounced, but long after a winner is declared no legal events remedy the fraudulent elections. Thus far local news on an internet site still has no story about the event we witnessed which took place about 1:30. Around 2:00 I saw the sign announcing the six polling places for voters not in their home districts being taken down. It had been marked, "no ballots".
    • Nancy Davies
      Good questions. People were angry at all six out-of-district polling places, but I personally witnessed only the one mini-riot, in the zócalo where the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2012
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        Good questions. People were angry at all six out-of-district polling places, but I personally  witnessed only the one  mini-riot, in the zócalo where the orchestra usually plays. Diana Ricci was there also, her photos are in a separate email. She was not able to get close enough to the crowd pursuing the official as he ran into the restaurant. We had been sitting at an outside table next to the event. But there were dozens of taller people (!) so I bet those photos will appear in the Oaxaca papers.. The six special sites listed were all in Oaxaca city, but I personally saw only one other, on Porfirio Diaz. I spoke with one angry young woman who could not vote, nor her husband. They believed that it was a deliberate trick.
        I think it's important to point out that although AMLO may have lost the presidency (not confirmed, and there was  a lot of fraud, for sure), the encouraging facts are: 1) more and more people do not quietly accept being cheated, 2) the #YoSoy132 movement nationally is going to march and keep on marching, 3) the left in general moved upward in popularity while the PAN fell.

        AMLO is six years older than the last time we went through this. Whether you beleive there was fraud on the part of the PRI or not, he's more mellow, and presenting himself as less belligerent. Not me. I'm six years older too and pretty pissed off. But with age I'm also more aware that we need to be working toward and supporting autonomies, food self-sufficiency, and alternative ways to save the environment and culture. As John Gibler (and others) wrote, Mexico has been in a state of rebellion against internal colonialism for 500 years. La lucha sigue.

        Kris, have you the national statistics about changes in governorships and diputados that you can post for us?


        On Sun, Jul 1, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Kristin Bricker <krisbricker@...> wrote:
        Hi Nancy,

        Was the Zocalo actually a polling place?  Or why were people lined up there?

        The six places designated for voters outside their districts, were they in the Zocalo?  Or elsewhere?  If they were elsewhere, why were people nearly rioting in the Zocalo over no ballots, why weren't they rioting at the polling places?

        Sorry, I'm just a bit confused.  Thank you.



        On Sun, Jul 1, 2012 at 3:51 PM, Nancy Davies <nmsdavies@...> wrote:
         

        Fraud, of course. First, I went to my normal voting place. It had been moved, with two different signs designating two different but incorrect sites, all quite close.  I discovered the actual functioning site merely by accident. I did manage to vote, and poll watchers  (one of them my neighbor) were efficient and kind.)

        Then we went down to the zocalo, and learned that  six special voting sites for people who found themselves out of district today, but wanted to vote, had been designated. However, no ballots were delivered to any of those six polling places. This leads one to suspect that the ballots will be marked somewhere by somebody and delivered to be counted, by-passing the voters. The voters in the zocalo, lined up for some time, accosted the federal electoral authority (Fepade) whofinally showed up and said there were no ballots. A small riot of a hundred or so irate citizens ensued, with would-be voters shouting Fraud! Fraud and the terrified Fepade guy running for shelter, pursued by a throng of Oaxacan citizens. The Fepade man ran into a restaurant on the west side of the zocalo, and the crowd followed, shouting at the entrance. The restaurants and businesses on both sides of the besieged restaurant rolled down their iron doors. The local police arrived and called for reinforcements. Soon armed state police showed up, and a helicopter circled. TV Azteca came when it was all over, but lots of local reporters were getting photos. No violence broke out, the Fepade man was escorted out. Show and tell....

        This is all pretty much for nothing. Here in Mexico fraud can be denounced, but long after a winner is declared no legal events remedy the fraudulent elections. Thus far local news on an internet site still has no story about the event we witnessed which took place about 1:30. Around 2:00 I saw the sign announcing the six polling places for voters not in their home districts being taken down. It had been marked, "no ballots".




        --
        Kristin Bricker

        Freelance journalist / periodista independiente
        http://mywordismyweapon.blogspot.com

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