Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [oaxacastudyactiongroup] elections July 4

Expand Messages
  • Bob Stout
    Since I live in a predominantly workingclass PRI barrio I ll add a little to what the party in power is doing. 1. URO has built up a huge war chest--millions
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
      Since I live in a predominantly workingclass PRI barrio I'll add a little to what the party in power is doing.
      1. URO has built up a huge war chest--millions of pesos. He is an instrumental force in PRI nationally and manipulated the distribution of the federal monies apportioned to the states to give those with upcoming governor elections big extras. He has the national party's support, which the Alianza doesn't have; in addition, Peña Nieto in the Estado de Mexico also has a lot of "discretionary" funds he'll shift to Oaxaca if URO needs them.
      2. The PRI has a solid statewide organization, from the state government through the municipal and city governments. Most municipal and city mayors and presidents are priistas (including usos y costumbres communities) and each is charged with bringing their area into the PRI fold. If any polling places within their balliwick vote against the PRI, funds to them will be cut off (URO will have 4 months as a lame duck before the new governor takes office). No construction, no roads, no fertilizer, etc.
      3. The PRI will have poll watchers at every polling place in the state, something the Alianza will find it tough to match. (Polling places with only PRI pollwatchers in the past have reported as high as 95 percent votes for the PRI).
      4. The owners of the transportation companies support the PRI and will make buses available throughout the state to haul voters to the polls, especially in the rural areas of the Valley and the Isthmus. (After the vote those voting get their $200 or more stipend, plus a meal and probably mescal.) In the past there have been occasions when the party in power handed out pre-marked ballots, which the voters cast instead of the blank ones given them at the polls. On returning the blanks they received their payment.
      5. A lot of people I've talked to (non-the APPO, working class not professors or the elite) seriously question the ethics of the Alianza, saying things like "They're just a bunch without scruples trying to get elected for their personal benefit." Both big sections of the PAN nationally and lopezobradoristas question the ethics of the PRD-PAN union. Both parties have proved unscrupulous nationally, and not above major fraud, viz Calderón in 06 and Ortega for the PRD presidency in 07. And Cue isn't a "man of the people" by any means, but part of the rich elite that has been active in Oaxaca politics for over a century.
      6. A government worker told me that each government worker is charged with bringing his/her supervisors photocopies of at least 20 voter credentials of people they have recruited to vote for PRI. I'm not sure how many state workers there are but they number in the thousands. Multiply that by 20 and you have a sizeable voter core, even if some of them don't vote PRI.
           A neigbor of mine, a long-time former PRI state member of the mesa directiva, shrugs and says he isn't worried, that it will be "business as usual" for the PRI come election time. For sure the money will start to flow in May.
      Also I hear from pro-Cue people but Nancy, since you've reported on them, I'll leave that aside. Bob
       
       
       
      --- On Mon, 3/29/10, Nancy Davies <nmsdavies@...> wrote:

      From: Nancy Davies <nmsdavies@...>
      Subject: [oaxacastudyactiongroup] elections July 4
      To: "OSAG yahoo group" <oaxacastudyactiongroup@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Monday, March 29, 2010, 1:08 PM



      I went down to Plaza de la Danza to check out the rally for the coalition backing Gabino Cue--He drew fewer people than Lopez Obrador did in 2006, but not by many. The area was full of the usual political attributes: bands, banners, free t-shirts, sodas etc, with food vendors along every wall and stairway. It sounded like more people for the PAN than for the other parties--just my ear's estimate, thousands of people in total . I sat next to Pan women who were not shouting, but holding "Reforemos" flags, which is the PAN slogan for reforming Oaxaca. I was charmed however to see the izquierda comunitaria Zaachila contingent, along with many PT and PRD people. As for the politcians, I  recognized about ten from the various parties, plus from the university and the from the communist party, and I was seated well to the side so I suppose thee were another dozen on the stage..

      It seems to me that Cue said all the right things regarding poverty and lack of development. He presented a very sympathetic picture of what he saw when touring with AMLO in the usos y costumbres towns. How that translates into action, is another question.

      I will say that if the PRI wins, whether by fair means or fraud, there will be a bad reaction on the part of people who saw they could not make the change in the streets in 2006 using no violence. Now  it's time for the electoral way. Let's hope. I have not yet met anybody who says they will support the PRI.  I just don't know people  who are running little empires, here or in the rural areas who are bosses, government employees and/or mini-criminals, caciques, etc. If any of you are getting a picture from the other side I would like to hear from you.




    • Nancy Davies
      Thanks to Bob for his report. It seems I left the coalition rally too early ( I only went to estimate the crowd and the mood, not to listen!) and yesterday a
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
        Thanks  to Bob for his report. It seems I left the coalition rally too early ( I only went to estimate the crowd and the mood, not to listen!) and yesterday a fellow who was there told me that when Nava (the PAN president) was speaking somebody pulled the plug on the electric mike. Oh oh. That does not bode well for the coalition hanging together, does it-- I know many APPO people and sympathizers have bad feelings about the PAN's role in November of 2006, me included, as well we should. The outage was brief, and toward the  close of Nava's speech.  My informant also said that some organization leaders like EDUCA's Marcos Leyva don't think the coalition can pull this off. Oh oh again. Or does it not matter? Are we in for the same scenario regardless of who wins-- and what is that scenario, can you guess? Bob, I'd like to read what your Cue supporters say, too. I don't think anybody I've run into thinks he is anywhee but center right-- but is he a thief?

        On Thu, Apr 1, 2010 at 6:41 PM, Bob Stout <mexicoconamor@...> wrote:
         

        Since I live in a predominantly workingclass PRI barrio I'll add a little to what the party in power is doing.
        1. URO has built up a huge war chest--millions of pesos. He is an instrumental force in PRI nationally and manipulated the distribution of the federal monies apportioned to the states to give those with upcoming governor elections big extras. He has the national party's support, which the Alianza doesn't have; in addition, Peña Nieto in the Estado de Mexico also has a lot of "discretionary" funds he'll shift to Oaxaca if URO needs them.
        2. The PRI has a solid statewide organization, from the state government through the municipal and city governments. Most municipal and city mayors and presidents are priistas (including usos y costumbres communities) and each is charged with bringing their area into the PRI fold. If any polling places within their balliwick vote against the PRI, funds to them will be cut off (URO will have 4 months as a lame duck before the new governor takes office). No construction, no roads, no fertilizer, etc.
        3. The PRI will have poll watchers at every polling place in the state, something the Alianza will find it tough to match. (Polling places with only PRI pollwatchers in the past have reported as high as 95 percent votes for the PRI).
        4. The owners of the transportation companies support the PRI and will make buses available throughout the state to haul voters to the polls, especially in the rural areas of the Valley and the Isthmus. (After the vote those voting get their $200 or more stipend, plus a meal and probably mescal.) In the past there have been occasions when the party in power handed out pre-marked ballots, which the voters cast instead of the blank ones given them at the polls. On returning the blanks they received their payment.
        5. A lot of people I've talked to (non-the APPO, working class not professors or the elite) seriously question the ethics of the Alianza, saying things like "They're just a bunch without scruples trying to get elected for their personal benefit." Both big sections of the PAN nationally and lopezobradoristas question the ethics of the PRD-PAN union. Both parties have proved unscrupulous nationally, and not above major fraud, viz Calderón in 06 and Ortega for the PRD presidency in 07. And Cue isn't a "man of the people" by any means, but part of the rich elite that has been active in Oaxaca politics for over a century.
        6. A government worker told me that each government worker is charged with bringing his/her supervisors photocopies of at least 20 voter credentials of people they have recruited to vote for PRI. I'm not sure how many state workers there are but they number in the thousands. Multiply that by 20 and you have a sizeable voter core, even if some of them don't vote PRI.
             A neigbor of mine, a long-time former PRI state member of the mesa directiva, shrugs and says he isn't worried, that it will be "business as usual" for the PRI come election time. For sure the money will start to flow in May.
        Also I hear from pro-Cue people but Nancy, since you've reported on them, I'll leave that aside. Bob
         
         
         
        --- On Mon, 3/29/10, Nancy Davies <nmsdavies@...> wrote:

        From: Nancy Davies <nmsdavies@...>
        Subject: [oaxacastudyactiongroup] elections July 4
        To: "OSAG yahoo group" <oaxacastudyactiongroup@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Monday, March 29, 2010, 1:08 PM



        I went down to Plaza de la Danza to check out the rally for the coalition backing Gabino Cue--He drew fewer people than Lopez Obrador did in 2006, but not by many. The area was full of the usual political attributes: bands, banners, free t-shirts, sodas etc, with food vendors along every wall and stairway. It sounded like more people for the PAN than for the other parties--just my ear's estimate, thousands of people in total . I sat next to Pan women who were not shouting, but holding "Reforemos" flags, which is the PAN slogan for reforming Oaxaca. I was charmed however to see the izquierda comunitaria Zaachila contingent, along with many PT and PRD people. As for the politcians, I  recognized about ten from the various parties, plus from the university and the from the communist party, and I was seated well to the side so I suppose thee were another dozen on the stage..

        It seems to me that Cue said all the right things regarding poverty and lack of development. He presented a very sympathetic picture of what he saw when touring with AMLO in the usos y costumbres towns. How that translates into action, is another question.

        I will say that if the PRI wins, whether by fair means or fraud, there will be a bad reaction on the part of people who saw they could not make the change in the streets in 2006 using no violence. Now  it's time for the electoral way. Let's hope. I have not yet met anybody who says they will support the PRI.  I just don't know people  who are running little empires, here or in the rural areas who are bosses, government employees and/or mini-criminals, caciques, etc. If any of you are getting a picture from the other side I would like to hear from you.





      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.