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CC law on door alarms

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  • mchgh_lln
    Just to be clear, the law, also know as Avonte s Law, doesn t require the alarms. The law requires the DOE to evalute a need for such alarms. The law also
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 25 6:21 AM
      Just to be clear, the law, also know as Avonte's Law, doesn't require the alarms.  The law requires the DOE to evalute a need for such alarms.  The law also requires the DOE to give City Council a list of the schools they think require the alarms by May 30, 2015, not this year. 
      In the mean time, what is being done to protect these children? 

      "The City Council unanimously passed legislation to require the Department of Education to evaluate putting alarms on school doors following the death of an autistic boy who disappeared from his school.

      The bill is named for Avonte Oquendo, a 14-year-old boy who was caught on camera walking out of his school. There was a massive search for the missing youngster, but his remains were found in January.

      Sponsored by Councilman Robert Cornegy, the bill requires the DOE and the NYPD to evaluate placing alarms on exterior doors at schools and prioritize where they are most needed. The DOE would have to submit a report to the Council by May 30, which would include a list of where the alarms were needed and a timeline for installing them."


      Read more at http://observer.com/2014/07/city-council-passes-avontes-law-to-evaluate-school-door-alarms/#ixzz38UAwHJJJ
      Follow us: @newyorkobserver on Twitter | New York Observer

       




    • Deborah Alexander
      Wow, that s some particularly unctuous spin, calling it Avonte s Law . On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 9:21 AM, mchgh_lln@yahoo.com [nyceducationnews]
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 25 6:30 AM
        Wow, that's some particularly unctuous spin, calling it "Avonte's Law".


        On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 9:21 AM, mchgh_lln@... [nyceducationnews] <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
         

        Just to be clear, the law, also know as Avonte's Law, doesn't require the alarms.  The law requires the DOE to evalute a need for such alarms.  The law also requires the DOE to give City Council a list of the schools they think require the alarms by May 30, 2015, not this year. 
        In the mean time, what is being done to protect these children? 

        "The City Council unanimously passed legislation to require the Department of Education to evaluate putting alarms on school doors following the death of an autistic boy who disappeared from his school.

        The bill is named for Avonte Oquendo, a 14-year-old boy who was caught on camera walking out of his school. There was a massive search for the missing youngster, but his remains were found in January.

        Sponsored by Councilman Robert Cornegy, the bill requires the DOE and the NYPD to evaluate placing alarms on exterior doors at schools and prioritize where they are most needed. The DOE would have to submit a report to the Council by May 30, which would include a list of where the alarms were needed and a timeline for installing them."


        Read more at http://observer.com/2014/07/city-council-passes-avontes-law-to-evaluate-school-door-alarms/#ixzz38UAwHJJJ
        Follow us: @newyorkobserver on Twitter | New York Observer
        New York Observer
        News and commentary, authoritative and sophisticated, for influencers in New York and the country,...
        Preview by Yahoo

         





      • Falik - MSN
        It’s interesting, but there are far more important issues facing the city. To name a few: - We need a true education system. - We need a Department of
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 25 6:37 AM
          It’s interesting, but there are far more important issues facing the city.  To name a few:
           
          - We need a true education system.
           
          - We need a Department of Transportation that operates within the law (federal and state) and doesn’t run for an exemption whenever it is inconvenient.
           
          - We need a DEP that protects the city’s water supply from catastrophic events such as earth movement (earthquakes).
           
          E
           
          Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:30 AM
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] CC law on door alarms
           
           

          Wow, that's some particularly unctuous spin, calling it "Avonte's Law".


          On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 9:21 AM, mchgh_lln@... [nyceducationnews] <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           

          Just to be clear, the law, also know as Avonte's Law, doesn't require the alarms.  The law requires the DOE to evalute a need for such alarms.  The law also requires the DOE to give City Council a list of the schools they think require the alarms by May 30, 2015, not this year. 
          In the mean time, what is being done to protect these children? 

          "The City Council unanimously passed legislation to require the Department of Education to evaluate putting alarms on school doors following the death of an autistic boy who disappeared from his school.

          The bill is named for Avonte Oquendo, a 14-year-old boy who was caught on camera walking out of his school. There was a massive search for the missing youngster, but his remains were found in January.

          Sponsored by Councilman Robert Cornegy, the bill requires the DOE and the NYPD to evaluate placing alarms on exterior doors at schools and prioritize where they are most needed. The DOE would have to submit a report to the Council by May 30, which would include a list of where the alarms were needed and a timeline for installing them."


          Read more at http://observer.com/2014/07/city-council-passes-avontes-law-to-evaluate-school-door-alarms/#ixzz38UAwHJJJ
          Follow us: @newyorkobserver on Twitter | New York Observer
          New York Observer
          News and commentary, authoritative and sophisticated, for influencers in New York and the country,...
          Preview by Yahoo

           




           
        • mchgh_lln
          I disagree with you statement, a missing or dead child is important. The issue is, what is being done now to keep these children safe.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 25 6:57 AM
            I disagree with you statement, a missing or dead child is important. 
            The issue is, what is being done now to keep these children safe.
          • Falik - MSN
            I didn’t say that such a child isn’t important, but I remember hearing Mayor Robert F. Wagner discussing his job. He described it as deciding who he would
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 25 9:17 AM
              I didn’t say that such a child isn’t important, but I remember hearing Mayor Robert F. Wagner discussing his job.  He described it as deciding who he would kill – understanding full well that was the effect of a dollar given to the police over water supply, or water over the fire department, etc.  We can’t make everyone in the city 100% safe, so how should we spend scarce resources – dollars and management time.  We could eliminate quite a number of deaths on the subway by enclosing the platforms, as they’ve done at JFK.  Wouldn’t that be a better use of the resources?  After all, there are numbers of deaths and injuries every year.  Leadership is making hard allocation choices.
               
              Eugene Falik
               
              Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:57 AM
              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] CC law on door alarms
               
               

              I disagree with you statement, a missing or dead child is important. 
              The issue is, what is being done now to keep these children safe.

            • mchgh_lln
              Remind me not to meet you on a trek across the dessert
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 25 5:01 PM
                Remind me not to meet you on a trek across the dessert
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