Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

More re Arts HS Admissions

Expand Messages
  • Susan Crawford
    Joyce Szuflita gives an accurate description of what is expected of incoming LaGuardia students -- a considerable level of accomplishment in their art. To
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Joyce Szuflita gives an accurate description of what is expected of incoming LaGuardia students -- a considerable level of accomplishment in their art.  To achieve that takes years of music or art lessons, or of dance training.  With the evisceration of arts programming under Bloomberg/Klein, it is little wonder that most of this training is done privately, and at a family's expense.

      As far as I know, Wagner is the one middle school still standing with a music program strong enough to possibly produce candidates for LaGuardia on its own, i.e without the student having to have private lessons (apart from piano, anyway).  Wagner is also a magnet school, and has been open to applicants from throughout the city for decades. Students from the Special Music School are the only ones in NYC who receive sustained music training starting in kindergarten.  I don't know how many of those students apply to LaG.

      Most of the LaG music students come in having studied piano or guitar.  They immediately start to learn a second instrument so they can play in orchestra.

      Alan Singer suggests the DOE look to the many church choirs for more African-American applicants.  As it happens, much of the concentration of minority students is in the choral dept.  I believe the dance dept runs a close second.  

      During the application process for my older son in 2004 (for art, did not get in), it was explained to us that the school looks for strong academic backgrounds because that is what the State Ed Dept. and State legislature insist on in order to continue to support the school's existence.  This was not articulated so specifically when my younger son applied in 2009 (for music, did get in and graduated last June), or maybe they did and I missed it.

      HOWEVER, the new principal at LaG should NOT be using last spring's CC tests as any sort of criteria for entry, as has now been established by the state legislature.  

      ALSO, a number of schools throughout the city have performing arts programs as part of their overall academic programs.  However, some of those programs were upended by the previous DOE.  These include the program that was in the MLK complex, but whose space was given to the Special Music School last year so it could expand.  Similarly, rehearsal rooms at Wadleigh, which also has a performing arts track, have been appropriated by the expanding Success Academy that was placed there.

      As with everything NYC, this story is far more complicated than just the numbers suggest.  If more music and arts programs had been maintained K-8 over the past decade, and if more magnet schools specializing in the arts had been allowed to flourish, the demographic profile of LaG might look very different.

      Susan
    • melmeer
      Excellent points. I agree completely. I would take issue only with the notion that Wagner is the only school that is preparing students for LaGuardia on its
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Excellent points.  I agree completely.

        I would take issue only with the notion that Wagner is the only school that is preparing students for LaGuardia on its own.

        By some extraordinary planning, budgeting and perhaps pushback to Tweed the outstanding principal of MS 158Q (Marie Curie MS) maintains a full program of studio art, dance, chorus and music, both band, jazz band and small orchestra.  An outstanding band director teaches all the band instruments from scratch and regularly sends students to LaGuardia who have been playing with her for just two years.  It's extraordinary.  You should hear that band!  More than a couple of art students from MS158Q have also gone to LaGuardia in the last few years.

        With programs like this the children are given one more reason to want to come to school every day.

        MS 158Q is not a magnet school and has a mixed population.  It can be done with the right leadership.

        Mel


        On 4/29/2014 12:56 PM, Susan Crawford wrote:
         

        Joyce Szuflita gives an accurate description of what is expected of incoming LaGuardia students -- a considerable level of accomplishment in their art.  To achieve that takes years of music or art lessons, or of dance training.  With the evisceration of arts programming under Bloomberg/Klein, it is little wonder that most of this training is done privately, and at a family's expense.


        As far as I know, Wagner is the one middle school still standing with a music program strong enough to possibly produce candidates for LaGuardia on its own, i.e without the student having to have private lessons (apart from piano, anyway).  Wagner is also a magnet school, and has been open to applicants from throughout the city for decades. Students from the Special Music School are the only ones in NYC who receive sustained music training starting in kindergarten.  I don't know how many of those students apply to LaG.

        Most of the LaG music students come in having studied piano or guitar.  They immediately start to learn a second instrument so they can play in orchestra.

        Alan Singer suggests the DOE look to the many church choirs for more African-American applicants.  As it happens, much of the concentration of minority students is in the choral dept.  I believe the dance dept runs a close second.  

        During the application process for my older son in 2004 (for art, did not get in), it was explained to us that the school looks for strong academic backgrounds because that is what the State Ed Dept. and State legislature insist on in order to continue to support the school's existence.  This was not articulated so specifically when my younger son applied in 2009 (for music, did get in and graduated last June), or maybe they did and I missed it.

        HOWEVER, the new principal at LaG should NOT be using last spring's CC tests as any sort of criteria for entry, as has now been established by the state legislature.  

        ALSO, a number of schools throughout the city have performing arts programs as part of their overall academic programs.  However, some of those programs were upended by the previous DOE.  These include the program that was in the MLK complex, but whose space was given to the Special Music School last year so it could expand.  Similarly, rehearsal rooms at Wadleigh, which also has a performing arts track, have been appropriated by the expanding Success Academy that was placed there.

        As with everything NYC, this story is far more complicated than just the numbers suggest.  If more music and arts programs had been maintained K-8 over the past decade, and if more magnet schools specializing in the arts had been allowed to flourish, the demographic profile of LaG might look very different.

        Susan

      • zakhare
        Wagner is not a school open to the entire city and has never been. It a neighborhood school in D2 zoned for D2 students only. I don t disagree about gutting of
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          Wagner is not a school open to the entire city and has never been. It a neighborhood school in D2 zoned for D2 students only.

          I don't disagree about gutting of arts and music curriculum in schools, it is a moral outrage. But I am surprised at the outrage about the low scoring child not getting into Laguardia. It's always been a school that was strong academically. Kids there spend considerable time in rehearsals and practices and if the incoming student comes with 2's on the state test, how is he going to sustain doing all that work on top of being successful in academic work? 

          Also, there are other excellent performing arts schools - Talents Unlimited, PPAS, etc. Most students who apply to LaGuardia apply to those too. It's just that there are so few good high schools and such strong demand that the schools can and will always cherry pick the best. If someone's talents are comparable but one student is better academically, it's easy to justify a school accepting a child with better grades.
        • Deborah Meier
          Low-scoring and academically unready are NOT THE SAME THING. This kid had an A academic record. Too many excuses for the miserable record the specialized
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 29, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Low-scoring and academically unready are NOT THE SAME THING.
            This kid had an A academic record.
            Too many excuses for the miserable record the specialized schools have.  And LaGuardia!!!  As I recall it always was the better integrated school.  Shocking.  


            For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com








            On Apr 29, 2014, at 3:57 PM, zakhare@... wrote:

             

            Wagner is not a school open to the entire city and has never been. It a neighborhood school in D2 zoned for D2 students only.


            I don't disagree about gutting of arts and music curriculum in schools, it is a moral outrage. But I am surprised at the outrage about the low scoring child not getting into Laguardia. It's always been a school that was strong academically. Kids there spend considerable time in rehearsals and practices and if the incoming student comes with 2's on the state test, how is he going to sustain doing all that work on top of being successful in academic work? 

            Also, there are other excellent performing arts schools - Talents Unlimited, PPAS, etc. Most students who apply to LaGuardia apply to those too. It's just that there are so few good high schools and such strong demand that the schools can and will always cherry pick the best. If someone's talents are comparable but one student is better academically, it's easy to justify a school accepting a child with better grades.


          • Neal H. Hurwitz
            Talent Unlimited HS --- good enough at best... musical theater is very good... my two daughters have attended... mixed on teaching staff and leadership, both
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 29, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              Talent Unlimited HS --- good enough at best...  
              musical theater is very good... 
              my two daughters have attended... 
              mixed on teaching staff and leadership, both in school and PA... 

              excellent performing arts schools - Talents Unlimited


              Neal H. Hurwitz
              NY, NY

              :-)


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Deborah Meier <deborahmeier@...>
              To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, Apr 29, 2014 4:23 pm
              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: More re Arts HS Admissions

               
              Low-scoring and academically unready are NOT THE SAME THING.
              This kid had an A academic record.
              Too many excuses for the miserable record the specialized schools have.  And LaGuardia!!!  As I recall it always was the better integrated school.  Shocking.  


              For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com








              On Apr 29, 2014, at 3:57 PM, zakhare@... wrote:

               
              Wagner is not a school open to the entire city and has never been. It a neighborhood school in D2 zoned for D2 students only.

              I don't disagree about gutting of arts and music curriculum in schools, it is a moral outrage. But I am surprised at the outrage about the low scoring child not getting into Laguardia. It's always been a school that was strong academically. Kids there spend considerable time in rehearsals and practices and if the incoming student comes with 2's on the state test, how is he going to sustain doing all that work on top of being successful in academic work? 

              Also, there are other excellent performing arts schools - Talents Unlimited, PPAS, etc. Most students who apply to LaGuardia apply to those too. It's just that there are so few good high schools and such st rong demand that the schools can and will always cherry pick the best. If someone's talents are comparable but one student is better academically, it's easy to justify a school accepting a child with better grades.


            • Khem Irby
              Thank you. Many students do apply to all the audition options. Brooklyn has a high school of the arts as well only for Brooklyn residents. Your child must
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 30, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                Thank you.

                Many students do apply to all the audition options.

                Brooklyn has a high school of the arts as well only for Brooklyn residents.

                Your child must balance academics and performing arts.  So parents must support it.

                Khem

                Sent from my T-Mobile 4G Android device

                zakhare@... wrote:

                 

                Wagner is not a school open to the entire city and has never been. It a neighborhood school in D2 zoned for D2 students only.


                I don't disagree about gutting of arts and music curriculum in schools, it is a moral outrage. But I am surprised at the outrage about the low scoring child not getting into Laguardia. It's always been a school that was strong academically. Kids there spend considerable time in rehearsals and practices and if the incoming student comes with 2's on the state test, how is he going to sustain doing all that work on top of being successful in academic work? 

                Also, there are other excellent performing arts schools - Talents Unlimited, PPAS, etc. Most students who apply to LaGuardia apply to those too. It's just that there are so few good high schools and such strong demand that the schools can and will always cherry pick the best. If someone's talents are comparable but one student is better academically, it's easy to justify a school accepting a child with better grades.

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.