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Re: [nyceducationnews] Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

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  • Dunn yahoo
    D14 has one of the highest poverty rates in NYC. A lot of families do rely on schools as daycare. If a school closes suddenly and they can t arrange for
    Message 1 of 33 , Feb 13, 2014
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      D14 has one of the highest poverty rates in NYC.  A lot of families do rely on schools as daycare.  If a school closes suddenly and they can't arrange for someone to watch their children, they risk their jobs.  Maybe City Council should consider some legislation.  It's as important an issue as sick leave for families.


      On Feb 13, 2014, at 8:19 PM, Laura@... wrote:

       

      Staten Island had only 25% attendance.  The roads were very bad out here and schools should have been closed.  It was unsafe.  

      Laura E. Timoney
      (O) 718.987.6411
      (C) 917.667.2711
      Laura@...



      Norm Scott <normsco@...>
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      [nyceducationnews] Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent





       



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      Subject: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent
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      School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

      By Eliza Shapiro

      4:18 p.m. | Feb. 13, 2014

      The attendance rates at New York City's public schools plummeted on Thursday to 44.65, compared to an average of about 90 percent.

      That's slightly lower than attendance on the last major snow storm of the season on Jan. 22, when attendance was at 47 percent.

      The administration's decision to keep schools open despite the snow has been the subject of considerable controversy today, drawing criticism from union leaders and city officials normally aligned with the mayor. 

      See a full list of schools' attendance rates here: http://on.nyc.gov/1dPJ3S2

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    • Deborah Meier
      Yes, parents will travel their kids--if they have the money. As with private schools, it helps to have resources. For more information see website:
      Message 33 of 33 , Mar 13 11:19 AM
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        Yes, parents will travel their kids--if they have the money.  As with private schools, it helps to have resources.   


        For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com








        On Feb 16, 2014, at 11:33 AM, Lisa wrote:

         

        Thanks for all the thoughtful discussion points here, Brooke.
         "Neighborhood" school turn out to be a squishy concept, indeed.

         In D1 which has been w/o zones in elementary and middle schools since the late 80s/early 90's all of our schools are considered "neighborhood" schools, though the definition of "good schools" is highly subjective and seems to change and shift somewhat among different cohorts.

        The only thing I would push back on off the bat  is the notion that parents wil not travel to elementary schools.
         My own observation and the history/recent data study of D1 school ( and it sounds like D14, too?) belie that notion.

         NEST+M, now a citywide G and T select school started out as a neighborhood school but refused to use the local admissions criteria for fairness, equity and diversity, sorting instead for race, class and academic achievement on its own (for which the founding principal was famously removed-http://nymag.com/news/features/31272/ ).
         I regularly get calls from parents at NEST living in  far off neighborhoods in Queens, Brooklyn and Upper Manhattan. Kids as young as K travel every day to NEST.
         Similarly, our first DL Mandarin school has pulled in lots of out-of-district kids since its inception more than 15 years ago.

        Some people will travel out of their neighborhoods for select schools, certain kinds of programs, private schools (Riverdale and Horace Mann, for ex), to name a few,  especially if they do not feel their neighborhood offers the kind of school they want for their child.
        Sounds like that may be true somewhat for D14 which like charter schools and some D1 schools attract many of those families?

        There has to be a way to manage student assignment such that we all recognize that one size does not fit all; that "address is not destiny" as the reformers put it, anymore than skin color, academic ability, language orientation, SES,or other markers need be.

         From there we do not need to use the limited lens and tools of free market delivery models for goods and services to assign students to public schools.
         Under enrollment/overcrowding/ segregation/ high concentrations of at risk students and families/inequitable distributions of resources are all worthy of our attention and solution.

         Zones and markets do not do that- it is high time we create the conditions to help all school communities to help all students thrive and succeed.


        Lisa

        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        From: bdunn90@...
        Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2014 20:58:39 -0500
        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

         

        Lisa, you know I always agree with you. :) 

        Generally, I think the 65% walking to school idea works - along with ties to the neighborhood through local afterschool partnerships. Horrible weather drives the point home, doesn't it?

        That said, I actually think we could do with a bit more idealizing of neighborhood schools, particularly schools that get short shrift in the "good" category because they don't have white students or high income students.  We have a lot of great schools that aren't considered great, because they are filled exclusively with low income families of color.

        I get what you're saying about zoned schools in high income areas.  We all know that there are large areas in Manhattan and Brooklyn that are inaccessible to economic diversity.  Those areas are overcrowded as well, so there wouldn't be any room to create diversity within those zones.  

        As far as elementary schools go, parents don't like to travel too far to attend any public school.  And I don't believe they should. All that money spent figuring out, studying, and marketing choice, etc., is better spent on resources in zoned schools.  At the end of the day, people just want their closest elementary school to be great.  Middle and high schools shouldn't be that hard to get to either.

        D14 is a really interesting district to look at regarding "neighborhood schools."  We have 8 magnets that were designed to end latino isolation in schools, and most of them weren't successful because a) the location of the individual schools wasn't near the gentrifying neighborhoods b) there simply weren't enough white families or higher income families to increase diversity anywhere in the district and c) ALL our schools were under-enrolled so the whole district operated as a kind of secret, unknown "choice" district with parents coming from all over NYC to attend our schools (even before the gentrifiers caught on). There's also the annoying d) where the DOE totally undermined our magnets by preferencing charters intstead.

        I am always fascinated by what is considered a "good" school in D14 and what isn't.  For white parents, studies show (and data bears witness) that it has to do with the number of white people enrolled in the school already. For other cultures - it usually has to do with the grade of the school.  PS84, in my district, is highly desirable in the white gentrifying community, though our school grades are pretty low.  White parents who live near PS147 or PS120 or PS196 travel to PS84 because they don't have any confidence in their nearby schools because there white people don't go to them.  A truly vicious cycle. 

        I also loathe the free market approach that forces some schools to be "losers."  All concepts of "outreach" for schools, beyond building confidence and resources in our zoned school, favors  "choice," which really undermines all of our schools. 

        Brooke



        On Feb 15, 2014, at 5:49 PM, Lisa <lisabdonlan@...> wrote:

         

        Thanks for specifying that this is a school that serves kids from both inside (65%) and outside(35%) of the neighborhood.
        It makes me wonder if maybe there are different ways of defining "neighborhood schools" that we can agree upon.

        Does the school serve a geographically, racially, socioeconomically and academically diverse group of students that reflect the surrounding community/schools?
        Is the school accessible to different kinds of families from the area?
        How is outreach for the school handled?

        I would caution people from idealizing the 'neighborhood school'  and the current zoning system since not everyone has access to the highly sought after "good" schools that are mostly zoned for high income neighborhoods.

        It is understandable that folks who live, say, in the PS 41 (Greenwich Village) or PS 321 (Park Slope) or the PS 234 (Tribeca) or PS 87 (UWS) zones (as examples) might automatically assume that the existing neighborhood school /zone is the best way to assign students to seats.

         But how many parent do not have access to high performing, well resourced schools? 

         I am NOT a proponent of market based choice school assignment, but I do not buy into the false dichotomy around student assignment: either we have neighborhood-based assignment zones (not that zones necessarily reflect neighborhoods any way), or we must compete for limited seats under a market-style pure-choice based assignment system.

        If we look at student assignment through the lens of equity, neither of these systems does right by students, families and communities.

        Furthermore, denying the current real and structural  inequities among our neighborhood schools leaves room for the charter industry, the voucher lobby and the K Connect/dezoning proponents room to move their agenda forward.

        We can, if we try, do better to provide greater equity of access in NYC as dozens and dozens of schools districts across the US try to do.

        Lisa

        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        From: kari@...
        Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2014 10:23:07 -0500
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

         

        I’m with Gretchen.  Thursday gave me object lesson #1 (90s term, I know) why smaller class sizes are better.  Thursdays are my volunteer days at my 3rd grader’s school, and I can tell you we all had a great time, even at lunch and indoor recess.  We adults mentioned more than once how lovely it was to have a high ratio of adults to kids.  Another parent volunteer, Dr. Jenny, brought in Fred, the anatomical model, and several classes talked about the skeletal, digestive, nervous, etc. systems.  My daughter’s 3rd grade class made valentines cards, did some math, and read about a paragraph of Kate DiCamillo’s The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, allowing for lots of in-depth discussion to interrupt the reading.  The kids had a beautiful, sympathetic, wide-ranging conversation about a lovely few words.

        It’s a school of choice, and my daughter took the bus, after a 20 minute snowball fight waiting for it. I know more than half the kids were there—maybe 65%—so, more than city average.  But it’s also a school of choice to which many kids walk.

        I would also add, the pre-packaged sandwiches were definitely NOT hot.  In fact, they were still a little frozen on the inside.  But they were a lunch.  And the kids got oranges as well.


        Fri Feb 14, 2014 5:37 pm (PST) . Posted by:

        "Neal H. Hurwitz" nealhugh17

        Gretchen--- great!... Most of the reports I received said that nothing much was done... 'desultory&# 39; situation...
        no energy... no instruction ... etc. etc. (And looks like your child needs small(er) classes! :))

        City was 47% (and Stuyvesant 80%)... but what about teachers?

        Thanks, Neal

        Neal H. Hurwitz
        NY, NY

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mergenthaler gretchen <gmergenthaler@yahoo.com>
        To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Fri, Feb 14, 2014 8:30 pm
        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

        There was no way we were going to let my son stay home...his school is two (short) blocks away.
        He said he had a great day, that he got a lot done since there were only 11 kids there. He said he could focus (a rarity!), he got to work directly with the teacher (they got along for a change!) and that he wishes every day were like that. This is my son who hates school. ....Ah...if only every day could be like that...
        Gretchen





        On Friday, February 14, 2014 8:14 PM, Nancy K Cauthen <kidsbigandsmall@earthlink.net> wrote:



        Agreed! My son attends a neighborhood K-8 (and we happen to live right across the street). Yesterday' s attendance rate was 68%.

        Nancy Cauthen, D6 parent


        On 2/14/2014 6:45 PM, Diane Ravitch wrote:




        The price of "choice" is the destruction of neighborhood schools

        Diane Ravitch 

        On Feb 14, 2014, at 1:49 PM, Rachel Paster <rpaster@gmail.com> wrote:






        I'd also love to see these figures broken out by zoned schools versus schools of choice. My zoned school had over 55% attendance, much higher than the city average. Why? Because we can walk there. I get not wanting to put kids on the bus if the roads are unsafe, but much of the bussing is a function of having a system where parents go to schools that are nowhere near their homes. Zoned community schools are part of the solution.


        On Fri, Feb 14, 2014 at 10:25 AM, Neal H. Hurwitz <nealhugh@aol.com> wrote:






        1. I did not allow my kids to go to school. Too dangerous. (Most concerned about lousy drivers in NY NY these days...) 

        2. Schools open for parents who needed that, OK.

        3. Stuyvesant had 80% attendance while City was 47%... telling. But Stuy students reported that nothing much was done;

        how may teachers were absent?

        4. Mayor should have made it clearer that parents had choice.

        5. Mayor made mention that schools must be open under State madate unless conditions were too extreme--- he and

        Farina decided conditions were not too extreme and that is debatable...


        Absent students/teachers should not be penalized for 1/13.


        Thanks, Neal


        Neal H. Hurwitz 
        NY, NY


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kari Steeves <kari@....edu>
        To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Fri, Feb 14, 2014 10:08 am
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent







        It seems to me, first, the DOE should excuse absences for students, teachers, and staff on severe weather days. Then, I liked an idea a teacher suggested on FB, that the DOE offer what amounts to babysitting days. She taught in a high needs area, so she understands how helpful it is for schools to remain open, but she lives in Westchester and was unable to get out of her road. She wrote: “Why not pay local teachers to come in to some schools in each area (this would not cost more because the City pays substitutes to cover all the absences caused by teachers taking personal days) and advertise it as a babysitting day for those who need it: show movies, play games and serve a hot lunch?” 

        This debate is going on all over the city on all the social networking sites, with parents and teachers taking all kinds of sides, so the stark choice between snow day or not is never going to satisfy everyone. So why not something in between?


        Re: Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent



        Thu Feb 13, 2014 5:37 pm (PST) . Posted by:

        "Dunn yahoo" bdunn90


        D14 has one of the highest poverty rates in NYC. A lot of families do rely on schools as daycare. If a school closes suddenly and they can't arrange for someone to watch their children, they risk their jobs. Maybe City Council should consider some legislation. It's as important an issue as sick leave for families.

        On Feb 13, 2014, at 8:19 PM, Laura@Timoney.com wrote:

        > Staten Island had only 25% attendance. The roads were very bad out here and schools should have been closed. It was unsafe. 

        > Laura E. Timoney
        > (O) 718.987.6411
        > (C) 917.667.2711
        Laura@Timoney.com 


        > Norm Scott <normsco@gmail.com
        > Sent by: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        > 02/13/2014 07:59 PM
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        nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com

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        > [nyceducationnews] Fwd: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent









        > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        > From: Capital Pro <info@capitalnewyork.com>
        > Date: Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 4:38 PM
        > Subject: Whiteboard: School attendance rate: 44.6 percent
        > To: normsco@gmail.com


        > School attendance rate: 44.6 percent

        > By Eliza Shapiro

        > 4:18 p.m. | Feb. 13, 2014

        > The attendance rates at New York City's public schools plummeted on Thursday to 44.65, compared to an average of about 90 percent.

        > That's slightly lower than attendance on the last major snow storm of the season on Jan. 22, when attendance was at 47 percent.

        > The administration&# 39;s decision to keep schools open despite the snow has been the subject of considerable controversy today, drawing criticism from union leaders and city officials normally aligned with the mayor. 

        > See a full list of schools' attendance rates here: http://on.nyc.gov/1dPJ3S2

        > You've received this Capital Pro content because your customized settings include: City Hall (all whiteboards) or one of the following City Hall topics: education.

        > To change your alert settings, please go to your Pro settings page.

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        > If you believe this has been sent to you in error, please safely unsubscribe.









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