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FW: ***NEWS RELEASE*** LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY

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  • Leonie Haimson
    From: Press Office, New York City Comptroller John C. Liu [mailto:press@comptroller.nyc.gov] Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 11:34 AM Subject: ***NEWS RELEASE***
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 13, 2013
    • 1 Attachment
    • 467 KB

     

    From: Press Office, New York City Comptroller John C. Liu [mailto:press@...]
    Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 11:34 AM
    Subject: ***NEWS RELEASE*** LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY

     

     

    news-release

    PR13-06-086                                                                                                                     June 13, 2013

    Contact: Matthew Sweeney, (212) 669-3747                                                                             Page(s): 3

     

    ******************************************

    LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION

    OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY

    Schools Rejected Students Who Should Have Been Considered for Entrance,

    Gave Seats to Some Who Didn’t Meet Standards, Audit Finds

    ******************************************

    NEW YORK, N.Y. – City Comptroller John C. Liu today announced that an audit of the Department of Education’s (DOE’s) high-school placement process determined that the process often reached arbitrary and unfair results: It denied many students an opportunity to be matched to seats in certain highly competitive programs even when the students met all eligibility requirements, while offering seats to other students who had not met the criteria.

      

    “Our audit confirmed what many frustrated parents and students have long suspected: the City’s high-school placement process is often unfair and deeply flawed,” Comptroller Liu said. “Applying to high school is an important and stressful enough experience for students and parents, and it must not be left to a sloppy and random system like the one our audit found. We are pleased that the DOE has agreed to adopt our recommendations to ensure a fairer and sensible system.”

     

    The audit examined student placement for the 2011-12 school year at five schools considered among the most competitive for entrance in their respective boroughs. The schools are Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx), Baruch College Campus HS (Manhattan), Midwood HS Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn), Tottenville HS Science Institute (Staten Island), and Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens).

     

    Students can apply for up to 12 schools, which they rank in their order of preference. The DOE then enters the students’ choices into its Student Enrollment Management System (SEMS). Students who apply to a screened school, like those the audit examined, must meet certain selection criteria in order to be ranked for possible enrollment by the schools.  

     

    Screened schools use their own criteria — such as seventh-grade report cards, standardized tests, and attendance records — to screen students. Students who meet the criteria are ranked on a list for possible enrollment, although the DOE does not require screened schools to rank every single student who qualifies because of the overwhelming number of applicants. Finally, SEMS matches students’ preferences against the schools ranking.  When a student’s top pick school ranks them high there can a match and the student would be offered a seat at the school.

     

    The five schools received 21,315 applications for 828 seats. 

    ·         5,702 students appeared to meet the screening criteria.

    ·         The programs ranked 4,075 students.

    ·         The audit found 1,946 unranked students, many of whom actually scored better than those who were ranked. 

    ·         319 (8 percent) of the 4,075 students who the programs ranked appear NOT to have met the criteria. Of these 319 students, 92 were offered seats at the schools, and 60 were enrolled.

     

    Chart: Questionable Rankings of Students by

    the Five Screened Schools

    High School

    Total Number of Applicants to Each Program

    Available Seat Target for Each Program

    # of Eligible Students Who Were Not Ranked

    # of Ineligible Students Who Were Ranked

    Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx)

    2,643

    81

    803

    24

    Baruch College Campus High School (Manhattan)

    7,712

    109

    972

    8

    Midwood High School, Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn)

    4,720

    300

    93

    284

    Tottenville High School, Science Institute  (Staten Island)

    952

    68

    74

    3

    Townsend Harris High School, Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens)

    5,288

    270

    4

    0

    Total

    21,315

    828

    1,946

    319

     

    The audit is attached and available for download here: http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2013/06-13-13-MH12-053A.shtm

     

    Other Findings

    Comptroller Liu’s audit also determined that:

    ·         The five schools failed to maintain adequate records. Auditors asked the schools to produce documentation explaining the rankings of certain applicants, but only one school, Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities, provided any records documenting its decisions. The other four had not kept such records, as they are required to do by the New York State Education Department.

    ·         DOE does not require high schools to have written procedures to explain the methodologies they use to rank students. For example, Midwood HS Medical Science Institute states that students need report card grades of 90-100 in seventh-grade English, math, social studies, and science classes, but does not let students and parents know that it gives the math and science grades greater weight than English and social studies grades, which is part of its ranking formula.

    ·         The DOE did not oversee the placement process in order to ensure that it ranked students fairly and consistently.

    ·         Middle schools are not keeping high-school applications, as required. The DOE could provide student applications for only 14 out of 150 randomly selected students, so there was no assurance that guidance counselors accurately recorded students’ choices.

     

    Response

    The DOE generally agreed with the audit’s nine recommendations. It agreed to:

    ·         Review the ranking practices at the four schools the audit report determined had questionable rankings in order to ensure that the schools are following their own published screens and DOE policy for student selection.

    ·         Require high schools with screened programs to document their ranking formula and processes.

    ·         Review screened schools’ ranking criteria, especially for those schools in high demand, in order to ensure that they are ranking students fairly and consistently.

    ·         Ensure schools keep records of their ranking of the students applying to their programs, as required by the State Education Department.

     

    Background

    The DOE manages two different high-school placement processes. The first, known as the high-school application process, is for eighth-grade students applying for the ninth grade and first-time ninth graders applying for the tenth grade. Schools in the application process select applicants by using one of seven admission methods: (1) test, (2) audition, (3) educational option, (4) limited unscreened, (5) screened, (6) unscreened, and (7) zoned.  Three-quarters (215,556) of the City’s 284,513 high-school students on register as of October 2011 had been placed at their schools through this placement process. Comptroller Liu’s audit focused on screened programs because they are one of the most popular for student applicants. For the 2011-2012 school year, 30 percent of the programs chosen by students were screened programs.  Screened programs comprised 25 percent of student matches.  However, because the schools themselves establish and oversee the ranking criteria and actually rank the students, the screened programs are also especially vulnerable to potential manipulation.

     

    The remaining 68,957 students were placed in their respective high schools through the second process, known as the over-the-counter process, which is for (1) new students, (2) students returning to New York City public schools, and (3) New York City public high school students transferring between high schools.

     

     

    Visit www.comptroller.nyc.gov for the latest news, events, and initiatives.

    Follow Comptroller Liu on Twitter. To receive Twitter updates via text message, text “follow johncliu” to 40404.

    View the latest Comptroller’s office videos on YouTube.

     

    # # #

     

      

     

     



    Sent from the New York City Office of the Comptroller. This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.

    ***Please consider the environment before printing this email.***

  • Deborah Meier
    Are you requesting more segregation, selectivity, etc? For more information see website: http://www.deborahmeier.com ... Are you requesting more segregation,
    Message 2 of 3 , Jun 15, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Are you requesting more segregation, selectivity, etc?


      For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com








      On Jun 13, 2013, at 11:41 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:

       

       

      From: Press Office, New York City Comptroller John C. Liu [mailto:press@...]
      Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 11:34 AM
      Subject: ***NEWS RELEASE*** LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY

       

       

      <image001.jpg>

      PR13-06-086                                                                                                                     June 13, 2013

      Contact: Matthew Sweeney, (212) 669-3747                                                                             Page(s): 3

       

      ******************************************

      LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION

      OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY

      Schools Rejected Students Who Should Have Been Considered for Entrance,

      Gave Seats to Some Who Didn’t Meet Standards, Audit Finds

      ******************************************

      NEW YORK, N.Y. – City Comptroller John C. Liu today announced that an audit of the Department of Education’s (DOE’s) high-school placement process determined that the process often reached arbitrary and unfair results: It denied many students an opportunity to be matched to seats in certain highly competitive programs even when the students met all eligibility requirements, while offering seats to other students who had not met the criteria.

        

      “Our audit confirmed what many frustrated parents and students have long suspected: the City’s high-school placement process is often unfair and deeply flawed,” Comptroller Liu said. “Applying to high school is an important and stressful enough experience for students and parents, and it must not be left to a sloppy and random system like the one our audit found. We are pleased that the DOE has agreed to adopt our recommendations to ensure a fairer and sensible system.”

       

      The audit examined student placement for the 2011-12 school year at five schools considered among the most competitive for entrance in their respective boroughs. The schools are Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx), Baruch College Campus HS (Manhattan), Midwood HS Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn), Tottenville HS Science Institute (Staten Island), and Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens).

       

      Students can apply for up to 12 schools, which they rank in their order of preference. The DOE then enters the students’ choices into its Student Enrollment Management System (SEMS). Students who apply to a screened school, like those the audit examined, must meet certain selection criteria in order to be ranked for possible enrollment by the schools.  

       

      Screened schools use their own criteria — such as seventh-grade report cards, standardized tests, and attendance records — to screen students. Students who meet the criteria are ranked on a list for possible enrollment, although the DOE does not require screened schools to rank every single student who qualifies because of the overwhelming number of applicants. Finally, SEMS matches students’ preferences against the schools ranking.  When a student’s top pick school ranks them high there can a match and the student would be offered a seat at the school.

       

      The five schools received 21,315 applications for 828 seats. 

      ·         5,702 students appeared to meet the screening criteria.

      ·         The programs ranked 4,075 students.

      ·         The audit found 1,946 unranked students, many of whom actually scored better than those who were ranked. 

      ·         319 (8 percent) of the 4,075 students who the programs ranked appear NOT to have met the criteria. Of these 319 students, 92 were offered seats at the schools, and 60 were enrolled.

       

      Chart: Questionable Rankings of Students by

      the Five Screened Schools

      High School

      Total Number of Applicants to Each Program

      Available Seat Target for Each Program

      # of Eligible Students Who Were Not Ranked

      # of Ineligible Students Who Were Ranked

      Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx)

      2,643

      81

      803

      24

      Baruch College Campus High School (Manhattan)

      7,712

      109

      972

      8

      Midwood High School, Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn)

      4,720

      300

      93

      284

      Tottenville High School, Science Institute  (Staten Island)

      952

      68

      74

      3

      Townsend Harris High School, Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens)

      5,288

      270

      4

      0

      Total

      21,315

      828

      1,946

      319

       

      The audit is attached and available for download here: http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2013/06-13-13-MH12-053A.shtm

       

      Other Findings

      Comptroller Liu’s audit also determined that:

      ·         The five schools failed to maintain adequate records. Auditors asked the schools to produce documentation explaining the rankings of certain applicants, but only one school, Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities, provided any records documenting its decisions. The other four had not kept such records, as they are required to do by the New York State Education Department.

      ·         DOE does not require high schools to have written procedures to explain the methodologies they use to rank students. For example, Midwood HS Medical Science Institute states that students need report card grades of 90-100 in seventh-grade English, math, social studies, and science classes, but does not let students and parents know that it gives the math and science grades greater weight than English and social studies grades, which is part of its ranking formula.

      ·         The DOE did not oversee the placement process in order to ensure that it ranked students fairly and consistently.

      ·         Middle schools are not keeping high-school applications, as required. The DOE could provide student applications for only 14 out of 150 randomly selected students, so there was no assurance that guidance counselors accurately recorded students’ choices.

       

      Response

      The DOE generally agreed with the audit’s nine recommendations. It agreed to:

      ·         Review the ranking practices at the four schools the audit report determined had questionable rankings in order to ensure that the schools are following their own published screens and DOE policy for student selection.

      ·         Require high schools with screened programs to document their ranking formula and processes.

      ·         Review screened schools’ ranking criteria, especially for those schools in high demand, in order to ensure that they are ranking students fairly and consistently.

      ·         Ensure schools keep records of their ranking of the students applying to their programs, as required by the State Education Department.

       

      Background

      The DOE manages two different high-school placement processes. The first, known as the high-school application process, is for eighth-grade students applying for the ninth grade and first-time ninth graders applying for the tenth grade. Schools in the application process select applicants by using one of seven admission methods: (1) test, (2) audition, (3) educational option, (4) limited unscreened, (5) screened, (6) unscreened, and (7) zoned.  Three-quarters (215,556) of the City’s 284,513 high-school students on register as of October 2011 had been placed at their schools through this placement process. Comptroller Liu’s audit focused on screened programs because they are one of the most popular for student applicants. For the 2011-2012 school year, 30 percent of the programs chosen by students were screened programs.  Screened programs comprised 25 percent of student matches.  However, because the schools themselves establish and oversee the ranking criteria and actually rank the students, the screened programs are also especially vulnerable to potential manipulation.

       

      The remaining 68,957 students were placed in their respective high schools through the second process, known as the over-the-counter process, which is for (1) new students, (2) students returning to New York City public schools, and (3) New York City public high school students transferring between high schools.

       

       

      Visit www.comptroller.nyc.gov for the latest news, events, and initiatives.

      Follow Comptroller Liu on Twitter. To receive Twitter updates via text message, text “follow johncliu” to 40404.

      View the latest Comptroller’s office videos on YouTube.

       

      # # #

       

        

       

       



      Sent from the New York City Office of the Comptroller. This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.

      ***Please consider the environment before printing this email.***



    • shulmandl
      Look at the Midwood School. Clearly someone or something messed with either the numbers or the entering class.
      Message 3 of 3 , Jun 16, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Look at the Midwood School. Clearly someone or something messed with either the numbers or the entering class.


        --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, Deborah Meier <deborahmeier@...> wrote:
        >
        > Are you requesting more segregation, selectivity, etc?
        >
        >
        > For more information see website: http://www.deborahmeier.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Jun 13, 2013, at 11:41 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:
        >
        > > [Attachment(s) from Leonie Haimson included below]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > From: Press Office, New York City Comptroller John C. Liu [mailto:press@...]
        > > Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 11:34 AM
        > > Subject: ***NEWS RELEASE*** LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > <image001.jpg>
        > >
        > > PR13-06-086 June 13, 2013
        > >
        > > Contact: Matthew Sweeney, (212) 669-3747 Page(s): 3
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ******************************************
        > >
        > > LIU: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SELECTION
        > >
        > > OFTEN UNFAIR AND ARBITRARY
        > >
        > > Schools Rejected Students Who Should Have Been Considered for Entrance,
        > >
        > > Gave Seats to Some Who Didn't Meet Standards, Audit Finds
        > >
        > > ******************************************
        > >
        > > NEW YORK, N.Y. – City Comptroller John C. Liu today announced that an audit of the Department of Education's (DOE's) high-school placement process determined that the process often reached arbitrary and unfair results: It denied many students an opportunity to be matched to seats in certain highly competitive programs even when the students met all eligibility requirements, while offering seats to other students who had not met the criteria.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > "Our audit confirmed what many frustrated parents and students have long suspected: the City's high-school placement process is often unfair and deeply flawed," Comptroller Liu said. "Applying to high school is an important and stressful enough experience for students and parents, and it must not be left to a sloppy and random system like the one our audit found. We are pleased that the DOE has agreed to adopt our recommendations to ensure a fairer and sensible system."
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The audit examined student placement for the 2011-12 school year at five schools considered among the most competitive for entrance in their respective boroughs. The schools are Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx), Baruch College Campus HS (Manhattan), Midwood HS Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn), Tottenville HS Science Institute (Staten Island), and Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens).
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Students can apply for up to 12 schools, which they rank in their order of preference. The DOE then enters the students' choices into its Student Enrollment Management System (SEMS). Students who apply to a screened school, like those the audit examined, must meet certain selection criteria in order to be ranked for possible enrollment by the schools.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Screened schools use their own criteria — such as seventh-grade report cards, standardized tests, and attendance records — to screen students. Students who meet the criteria are ranked on a list for possible enrollment, although the DOE does not require screened schools to rank every single student who qualifies because of the overwhelming number of applicants. Finally, SEMS matches students' preferences against the schools ranking. When a student's top pick school ranks them high there can a match and the student would be offered a seat at the school.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The five schools received 21,315 applications for 828 seats.
        > >
        > > · 5,702 students appeared to meet the screening criteria.
        > >
        > > · The programs ranked 4,075 students.
        > >
        > > · The audit found 1,946 unranked students, many of whom actually scored better than those who were ranked.
        > >
        > > · 319 (8 percent) of the 4,075 students who the programs ranked appear NOT to have met the criteria. Of these 319 students, 92 were offered seats at the schools, and 60 were enrolled.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Chart: Questionable Rankings of Students by
        > >
        > > the Five Screened Schools
        > >
        > > High School
        > >
        > > Total Number of Applicants to Each Program
        > >
        > > Available Seat Target for Each Program
        > >
        > > # of Eligible Students Who Were Not Ranked
        > >
        > > # of Ineligible Students Who Were Ranked
        > >
        > > Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science (Bronx)
        > >
        > > 2,643
        > >
        > > 81
        > >
        > > 803
        > >
        > > 24
        > >
        > > Baruch College Campus High School (Manhattan)
        > >
        > > 7,712
        > >
        > > 109
        > >
        > > 972
        > >
        > > 8
        > >
        > > Midwood High School, Medical Science Institute (Brooklyn)
        > >
        > > 4,720
        > >
        > > 300
        > >
        > > 93
        > >
        > > 284
        > >
        > > Tottenville High School, Science Institute (Staten Island)
        > >
        > > 952
        > >
        > > 68
        > >
        > > 74
        > >
        > > 3
        > >
        > > Townsend Harris High School, Intensive Academic Humanities (Queens)
        > >
        > > 5,288
        > >
        > > 270
        > >
        > > 4
        > >
        > > 0
        > >
        > > Total
        > >
        > > 21,315
        > >
        > > 828
        > >
        > > 1,946
        > >
        > > 319
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The audit is attached and available for download here: http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2013/06-13-13-MH12-053A.shtm
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Other Findings
        > >
        > > Comptroller Liu's audit also determined that:
        > >
        > > · The five schools failed to maintain adequate records. Auditors asked the schools to produce documentation explaining the rankings of certain applicants, but only one school, Townsend Harris HS Intensive Academic Humanities, provided any records documenting its decisions. The other four had not kept such records, as they are required to do by the New York State Education Department.
        > >
        > > · DOE does not require high schools to have written procedures to explain the methodologies they use to rank students. For example, Midwood HS Medical Science Institute states that students need report card grades of 90-100 in seventh-grade English, math, social studies, and science classes, but does not let students and parents know that it gives the math and science grades greater weight than English and social studies grades, which is part of its ranking formula.
        > >
        > > · The DOE did not oversee the placement process in order to ensure that it ranked students fairly and consistently.
        > >
        > > · Middle schools are not keeping high-school applications, as required. The DOE could provide student applications for only 14 out of 150 randomly selected students, so there was no assurance that guidance counselors accurately recorded students' choices.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Response
        > >
        > > The DOE generally agreed with the audit's nine recommendations. It agreed to:
        > >
        > > · Review the ranking practices at the four schools the audit report determined had questionable rankings in order to ensure that the schools are following their own published screens and DOE policy for student selection.
        > >
        > > · Require high schools with screened programs to document their ranking formula and processes.
        > >
        > > · Review screened schools' ranking criteria, especially for those schools in high demand, in order to ensure that they are ranking students fairly and consistently.
        > >
        > > · Ensure schools keep records of their ranking of the students applying to their programs, as required by the State Education Department.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Background
        > >
        > > The DOE manages two different high-school placement processes. The first, known as the high-school application process, is for eighth-grade students applying for the ninth grade and first-time ninth graders applying for the tenth grade. Schools in the application process select applicants by using one of seven admission methods: (1) test, (2) audition, (3) educational option, (4) limited unscreened, (5) screened, (6) unscreened, and (7) zoned. Three-quarters (215,556) of the City's 284,513 high-school students on register as of October 2011 had been placed at their schools through this placement process. Comptroller Liu's audit focused on screened programs because they are one of the most popular for student applicants. For the 2011-2012 school year, 30 percent of the programs chosen by students were screened programs. Screened programs comprised 25 percent of student matches. However, because the schools themselves establish and oversee the ranking criteria and actually rank the students, the screened programs are also especially vulnerable to potential manipulation.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The remaining 68,957 students were placed in their respective high schools through the second process, known as the over-the-counter process, which is for (1) new students, (2) students returning to New York City public schools, and (3) New York City public high school students transferring between high schools.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Visit www.comptroller.nyc.gov for the latest news, events, and initiatives.
        > >
        > > Follow Comptroller Liu on Twitter. To receive Twitter updates via text message, text "follow johncliu" to 40404.
        > >
        > > View the latest Comptroller's office videos on YouTube.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > # # #
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Sent from the New York City Office of the Comptroller. This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.
        > >
        > > ***Please consider the environment before printing this email.***
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.