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Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5

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  • sonja jones
    If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@yahoo.com) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate
    Message 1 of 9 , May 25, 2013
    If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@...) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate your presence at our Elementary Choice Town Hall meeting scheduled for May 30th at 6;00 PM to share your experience, view and voices on this matter.

    All interested parties are encouraged to attend to hear pertinent information as it relates to the proposal to dezone elementary schools within the geographical confines of District 5.  We have already confirmed representation from District 1 (thanks Lisa) and would love to hear from other districts that have approved dezoning and/or been approached by the DOE regarding dezoning.

    Thank you in advance for your support on this....


    _____________

    Sonja Jones

    President

    Community Education Council - District 5

    425 West 123rd Street

    New York, New York 10027

    Phone: (212) 769-7500, x234

    Fax: (212) 769-7619

    E-Mail: cec5@schools.nyc.gov

  • Noah Gotbaum
    Will plan to join you on the 30th Sonja. On CEC3 we ve dealt extensively with zoning, having done two rezonings in the past 5 years. We ve also had a forum
    Message 2 of 9 , May 25, 2013
      Will plan to join you on the 30th Sonja.  On CEC3 we've dealt extensively with zoning, having done two rezonings in the past 5 years.  We've also had a forum on controlled choice in which Lisa and Donna Nevel participated.  That said, the DOE has not proposed dezoning to us nor have we entertained the question formally.

      Best,

      Noah

      On Sat, May 25, 2013 at 11:25 AM, sonja jones <sjones12099@...> wrote:
       
      [Attachment(s) from sonja jones included below]

      If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@...) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate your presence at our Elementary Choice Town Hall meeting scheduled for May 30th at 6;00 PM to share your experience, view and voices on this matter.

      All interested parties are encouraged to attend to hear pertinent information as it relates to the proposal to dezone elementary schools within the geographical confines of District 5.  We have already confirmed representation from District 1 (thanks Lisa) and would love to hear from other districts that have approved dezoning and/or been approached by the DOE regarding dezoning.

      Thank you in advance for your support on this....


      _____________

      Sonja Jones

      President

      Community Education Council - District 5

      425 West 123rd Street

      New York, New York 10027

      Phone: (212) 769-7500, x234

      Fax: (212) 769-7619

      E-Mail: cec5@schools.nyc.gov




      --
      noah eliot gotbaum
      917 658 3213
    • Lisa Donlan
      How many parents, electeds and community members are aware of this discussion to significantly change admissions in their community schools that has taken
      Message 3 of 9 , May 25, 2013


        How many parents, electeds and community members are aware of this discussion to significantly change admissions in their community schools that has taken place in a dozen districts, many of them in the last months of the current Councils' terms?

        This Town Hall looks like a great place to begin to find out more!

        In the meantime, here is the DoE PPT deck on the unzoning proposal DoE has made to CEC 4, posted on the OPM webpage on Friday May 24th.

        http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/D1FC4556-52DC-4FC8-AF75-B6141E88AAFA/0/D4UnzoningDeck_MAYPRESENTATION.pdf

        I believe similar presentations may have been made in a number of other districts but the only other proposals posted are the ones that have passed in District 7 ( South Bronx) and District 23 ( Oceanhill Brownsville).

        DoE has been "having conversations" that I know about w/ CECs to unzone in: D4,  D5, D6 , D7, D13, D14 , D16, D17, D18, D23.

        It would be great to get reports back on how these conversations have gone in other districts and their current status. This is a major revolution in student assignment in NYC, one that permanently reduces the powers of the CES and affects how families access schools, yet there has been no outreach or publicity or reporting of any kind.


        Interestingly D1 has tried to alter the changes to "unzoning" of our district that was accomplished when DoE centralized admissions and altered our choice based plan from one with controls for equity of access and diversity to one that is purely market-based choice.

        As recently as May 2011 Chancellor Walcott stated in a D1 Town Hall that "equity is provided by current policy tied to parent and student choice" rather than to "categorical factors in a student's background (such as race or socioeconomic status)" and that 90% of students were placed in their first choice schools, making District One a "wonderful example of parent choice in action"..."The CEC is invited to to provide "ideas on ways to improve communication on the options available". In other words our long standing request for mechanisms to improve equity and diversity were once again not going to be addressed (see long history below) because for this administration choice= equity, no matter the context or the facts.


        In Jan 2013 at a D1 Town Hall with Chancellor Walcott, parents ask several questions about improving equity of access and diversity in our schools, explaining that national research and local data indicate that choice alone, without civil rights policies, contributes to segregation. The Chancellor engaged at length on the issue and promised to follow up,but it has taken 5 months of advocacy to even get a follow up meeting set up.


        I applaud CEC 5 for organizing this opportunity to come together to learn more about this complex issue. I heartily encourage people to attend this meeting next Thursday evening.
         Unzoning a district is complex and deserves a lot of careful consideration by all stakeholders.

        Lisa 
        CEC 1



        PS 

         more on D1's Unzoning History

        Feb 1991: CSB One removes zones or catchments, institutes a policy of controlled choice for diversity, using gender and race/ethnicity based lotteries in oversubscribed schools.


        April 1994:  Central Board/Chancellor approve CSB One resolution from Dec. 1993 instituting lotteries in oversubscribed schools pegged to District demographics to strive for fairness, diversity and equitable access.


        Jan 2002 CSB One revises policy to create gender, economic, racial and ethnic balance and academic and linguistic diversity


        Jan 2004: Community School Boards dissolved, DoE Regions created, status of district enrollment policy becomes unclear (ie: two tiered system of zoned vs choice schools instituted).


        Nov 2006: CEC meets w/ Marty Barr of OSEPO who indicates that DoE will soon centralize K-12 admission. CEC offers to work with DoE on  methods to improve integration in District One schools, based on geography or socio-economics, along with robust outreach to parents. No response form doE on tailoring the centralized policy to D1 values and history.


        March 2007: Centralized citywide admission policy imposed by OSEPO. All lotteries in oversubscribed schools are blind. All Pre-K students must reapply to K, resulting in 'double lotteries' for some students at some schools.


        April 2007:  Meeting at Tweed  with Chris Cerf, Deputy Chancellor; Marty Barr, OSEPO; Michael Best, Head of DoE Legal;  Lisa Donlan, CEC President;  Michelle Haring, District One Principal; Art Eisenberg, NYCLU; Delores Schaefer, former CSB One President to discuss District One admissions history/values. DoE non commital and concerned about legality of D1 ask.


        June 2007:  Joint Presidents Council /CEC District One town hall meeting w/ Mike Best( DoE General Counsel), Marty Barr, Liz Sciabarra (head of OSEPO). Hundreds of parents speak out on our community policy/values. DoE offers the possibility that District One be granted its own policy to maintain those values. DoE awaiting Supreme Court decision on race/admissions to proceed.


        July 2007: Meredith Court decision ruling on PICS, split between two opposing camps, allows for diversity as a compelling educational goal, as long as it can be defined and achieved with markers other than race alone, and does not categorize or treat individuals. (see Berkley/LA schools where use of race among other admission criteria recently upheld). 

        CEC forms Community Parent Workgroups:  Outreach; Diversity; Pre-k and Sibling priority. 

        Community Board 3 unanimously passes resolution supporting the CEC/community policy requests on admissions.


        Aug 2007: Diversity workgroup submits fifty page proposal for geography based model to OSEPO. No response from DoE.


        June  2007: Executive Director of elementary enrollment of OSEPO, promises to deliver a policy accommodating district needs including diversity mechanism prior to the start of the new school year.


         Oct 2007 Under pressure from local elected political representatives, parents, parent leaders and the news media, Mr. Barr attends CEC One calendar meeting to announce that a new Gifted and Talented policy proposal was imminent and that the early childhood/elementary policy would follow several weeks later- in late November. No policy follows.


        Jan 2008: Mr. Barr promises to collaborate with the workgroups studying demographic markers of diversity- geography; socioeconomic status; and ELL status, to model a process for the lotteries to admit  K students the next year.


        Feb 2008: Mr. Barr does not respond to email recap of these decisions, but does agrees on telephone to work with the CEC on a diversity–based lottery for the next year.


        Nov 2008: DoE releases guidelines for K admissions- making District One a citywide exception by centralizing admissions. Mr. Barr decides not to work on the diversity-based lottery or Pre-K issue with the CEC.


        Dec 2008: Meeting among parents/electeds/OSEPO to again request OSEPO’s collaboration on the two issues of Pre-K to K continuity and diversity-based lottery.


        March 2009: Letters of support to Chancellor Klein from CEC1, D1Presidents Council, NYS Assembly Speaker Silver, MBP Stringer, NYS Sen Squadron, NYS Assembly Member Kavanagh, Assembly Member Glick, City Council Member Mendez, City Council Member Gerson, and Public Advocate Gotbaum,  asking DoE to work with community stakeholders on diversity and equity based admissions plan as well as Pre-k to K continuity.


        Dec 2009 DoE proposes D1 admission policy giving preference to returning Pre-K students that select their current school first, and grants preference to out-of-district siblings,for Kindergarten. Implemented in Fall 2010.


        Spring/Fall 2010 CEC1 advocates for district schools on a myriad of  Pre-K articulation issues arising from new policy implementation.


        Oct 2010 Deputy Chancellor John King supports equitable and diversity-based  admissions plans as a viable mechanism for  improving school achievement and offers to act as a thought partner with CEC1.


        Feb 2011 D1 CEC helps organize Community Controlled Summit with CIF and Michael Alves for D1 and D3 school communities.


        May 2011 At D1 Town Hall, Chancellor Walcott is asked, in writing and orally, about the district's long standing request to return to diversity based admissions policies. His response is that "equity is provided by current policy tied to parent and student choice" rather than to "categorical factors in a student's  background (such as race or socioeconomic status)" and that 90% of students were placed in their first choice schools, making District One a "wonderful example of parent choice in action". The CEC is invited to to provide "ideas on ways to improve communication on the options available".


        Nov 2011 CEC1 presents at "Creating Equity-Based Student Assignment Mechanisms" Forum at NYU with Michael Alves and John Brittain.


        Jan 2012 DNA Info publishes article with interactive graphic showing increased segregation in District One schools.


        June 2012  CEC 1 participates in a Community Forum on the Challenges Facing D3 schools to share community experience with  controlled choice vs unzoning and ensuing increased segregation.


        Aug 2012 OCR complaint lodged claiming discriminatory admissions practices against 3 gentrifying schools in D1.


        Dec 2012 PEP approves policy giving priority to continuing Pre-K students applying to Kindergarten citywide in Fall 2013.

        Jan 2013 At D1 Town Hall with Chancellor Walcott, parents ask several questions about improving equity of access and diversity in our schools. Chancellor engages at length on the issue and promises to follow up, including specifically on a request to adopt the PS133 (Brooklyn) set-aside model. No follow up of any kind on any issue to date from the DoE.

        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        From: sjones12099@...
        Date: Sat, 25 May 2013 08:25:26 -0700
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5 [1 Attachment]

         
        [Attachment(s) from sonja jones included below]
        If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@...) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate your presence at our Elementary Choice Town Hall meeting scheduled for May 30th at 6;00 PM to share your experience, view and voices on this matter.

        All interested parties are encouraged to attend to hear pertinent information as it relates to the proposal to dezone elementary schools within the geographical confines of District 5.  We have already confirmed representation from District 1 (thanks Lisa) and would love to hear from other districts that have approved dezoning and/or been approached by the DOE regarding dezoning.

        Thank you in advance for your support on this....



        _____________

        Sonja Jones

        President

        Community Education Council - District 5

        425 West 123rd Street

        New York, New York 10027

        Phone: (212) 769-7500, x234

        Fax: (212) 769-7619

        E-Mail: cec5@schools.nyc.gov


      • carrie mclaren
        As a non-educator and as a parent who knows next to nothing about all of this, it d be great if someone could develop talking points for parents and community
        Message 4 of 9 , May 25, 2013
          As a non-educator and as a parent who knows next to nothing about all of this, it'd be great if someone could develop talking points for parents and community members in the other districts listed here. I'm in District 17, in a neighborhood (Prospect Lefferts Gardens) where nearly all professional parents send their kids outside the district, to a particular choice school in the district, or to private school. In a neighborhood where the zoned schools have 85 to 96% of students in poverty, arguing against choice will be an uphill battle. But if we had better information and alternatives for improving equity, it might help prevent this from happening.

          carrie


        • Leonie Haimson
          Sonja and others: I wrote a memo for D6 which some members found helpful when they were initially considering dezoning; it is posted here:
          Message 5 of 9 , May 25, 2013

            Sonja and others:  I wrote a memo for D6 which some members found helpful when they were initially considering dezoning; it is posted here:

             

            http://www.classsizematters.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Memorandum-D6.pdf

             

             

            Among other things, it would allow the DOE to close any school  in the district and put a charter in its place, and essential eliminate the sole legal authority a CEC now has which is to approve changes in zoning lines.

             

            Leonie Haimson

            Executive Director

            Class Size Matters

            124 Waverly Pl.

            New York, NY 10011

            212-674-7320

            leonie@...

            www.classsizematters.org

            http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

             

            Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

             

            Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

             

            Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

             

            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sonja jones
            Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 11:25 AM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5 [1 Attachment]

             

             

            [Attachment(s) from sonja jones included below]

            If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@...) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate your presence at our Elementary Choice Town Hall meeting scheduled for May 30th at 6;00 PM to share your experience, view and voices on this matter.

             

            All interested parties are encouraged to attend to hear pertinent information as it relates to the proposal to dezone elementary schools within the geographical confines of District 5.  We have already confirmed representation from District 1 (thanks Lisa) and would love to hear from other districts that have approved dezoning and/or been approached by the DOE regarding dezoning.

             

            Thank you in advance for your support on this....

             

            _____________

            Sonja Jones

            President

            Community Education Council - District 5

            425 West 123rd Street

            New York, New York 10027

            Phone: (212) 769-7500, x234

            Fax: (212) 769-7619

            E-Mail: cec5@schools.nyc.gov

          • Lisa Donlan
            Hi Carrie, It sure is complicated and each community, as you point out, is very different, with varying needs, options, geographies, demographics, histories
            Message 6 of 9 , May 25, 2013

              Hi Carrie, 


              It sure is complicated and each community, as you point out, is very different, with varying needs, options, geographies, demographics, histories and values. Here are some basic talking points from 

              The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education: 

              A collaborative initiative between parents in Community School Districts 1 and 3 and New York Appleseed, a nonprofit organization

               

              If DOE has proposed “dezoning” in your district, the CEC should make sure it has all the facts before making a decision, and we would like to help.


              ·         The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education believes that student assignment policy is a powerful tool for increasing equity of access to educational opportunity and reducing segregation by race, class and language status.  We are concerned that simply dezoning your district without incorporating mechanisms to address community concerns may not get you what you want.

              ·         The DOE has presented the District CEC with a stark choice between retaining the system of attendance zones or removing them in favor of “open enrollment” or “pure choice.”  Unfortunately both of these methods of student assignment lead to inequity of access and racial and economic segregation in our schools.

              ·         There are other, more equitable models of student assignment that DOE has NOT presented.  We have significant research and resources relating to these models in our work in other districts and would like to share them with the community and the CEC before any final decisions are made. These models exist not only in other cities, but right here in New York City. 

              ·         We believe that communities can advocate for student-assignment policies that increase equity of access and diversity in our schools: 

              o   Parents in Districts 1 and 3, for instance, are building community support for a system of choice that would incorporate diversity values. 

              o   Parents in District 13 worked with the DOE to create a student-assignment plan for an unzoned school in Park Slope, Brooklyn that will preserve access for low-income students and English Language Learners.

              ·         We would be happy to attend an upcoming meeting and spend 30 minutes with you sharing our work and learning more about yours.  We hope to learn more about your goals and offer support to you in the form of resources we have gathered to develop and promote equitable and fair assignment practices in our communities. 

               

              Please don’t hesitate to contact:

              Yasmin at ygs203@...  or 646-584-2013

              or Lisa at lisabdonlan@... or 212-677-9789

              or David at dtipson@... or 212-848-5468

              ( after 6/3, when he returns from vacation)


              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              From: brooklynite282@...
              Date: Sat, 25 May 2013 14:29:59 -0400
              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5

               
              As a non-educator and as a parent who knows next to nothing about all of this, it'd be great if someone could develop talking points for parents and community members in the other districts listed here. I'm in District 17, in a neighborhood (Prospect Lefferts Gardens) where nearly all professional parents send their kids outside the district, to a particular choice school in the district, or to private school. In a neighborhood where the zoned schools have 85 to 96% of students in poverty, arguing against choice will be an uphill battle. But if we had better information and alternatives for improving equity, it might help prevent this from happening.

              carrie



            • Victoria Frye
              In District 6 there was much opposition to the pure choice model (without controls) that was presented by the DOE. Parents noted immediately that it would not
              Message 7 of 9 , May 25, 2013
                In District 6 there was much opposition to the pure choice model (without controls) that was presented by the DOE.  Parents noted immediately that it would not increase "choice" but would actually diminish it, as our District has a number of magnet schools (8 total, as well as a G&T) that all families can apply to; rather than have a number of possible choices, children would be matched to a single choice.  Parents noted that if the DOE wanted to increase access to the magnet schools in the district there were a number of lower risk approaches they could take, such as supporting magnet schools ability to conduct direct mailings to potential families, just as charter schools do in our district.
                Beyond the model's effecting less and not more "choice," parents were concerned about children as young as 4 attending schools that are from home, requiring time and energy-intensive transportation.  District 6, unlike District 1, is quite large @70 block long and 30 blocks wide; the model offered the possibility of a family from Hamilton Heights being matched to a school in Inwood.  The negative effect that would have on parent involvement and child exhaustion at very young ages was also troubling.  Parents were also concerned about the effect of the pure choice/market-based model chipping away at community building, with a community school at the heart of it.  Others felt that removing a parent's guarantee of a seat at a local zoned school (not one 20 blocks away) was critical for families under stress, with large numbers of children, rigid schedules, etc.  One father spoke of enrolling his son at a time that both his wife and his son were battling extremely serious health conditions; he couldn't imagine being able to manage anything but a school 3 blocks away.  Parents of children with IEPs and learning disabilities were confused by the DOE's push to dezone and remove a child's seat at a local school, given the policy change that moved many students back to their local zoned schools.  Some D6 schools have had difficulty meeting the needs of students and the plan could compound this.  
                And most critically, our district is one with a large proportion of English Language Learners.  Parents and CEC members were concerned that these parents would not "work" the choice system as well as others, resulting in the "choice" model increasing disparities in access and opportunity rather than diminishing them.  There is a reason that the organization "Parents Making a Difference" (headed by a fellow CEC member) offers "insider secrets" and "tips" on how to "navigate the school choice bureaucracy."  
                Adding controls to the proposed model, as well as capping class sizes and adding significant resources to schools, and leveling the playing field in terms of school characteristics across a district, could address this, but the DOE has no intention of supporting that approach. (And the literature is full of information on the prerequisites of a student assignment system that is not based on geographical zones.)  As well, these could actually drive imporvements in student performance, which the pure choice/market based model cannot, except through creating space for charters and school closures, the DOE's preferred "school improvement approach."
                Finally, a number of us were very concerned about the negative effect dezoning would have on a CEC's power.  Once a CEC votes away it's power over zoning lines, a school can be closed or truncated and "something else" (charters, or condos or whatever) can be sited there because the students would have a seat at a zoned school, it would just be many many blocks away and not at the former local zoned school site.  Leonie sent around a memo detailing this previously.  Just after the dezoning debate quieted down in our district, an historic, local zoned school (PS 132, The Juan Pablo Duarte School) was targeted for closure.  The community rallied behind it and, although this was not the preferred outcome, the school was saved and slated for planned shrinkage, although a new school will be co-located there this fall.  Which raises another problem for D6, which is co-locations, which have not gone very well here and the dezoning will act to compact students in select schools, resulting in even more "underutilization" of others, creating space for the charters that need to be sited before this administration and their policies depart.   
                Parents in District 6 organized very effectively to stop dezoning and were assured that the plans would not go forward.  Those reassurances though have evaporated as the DOE pushes this plan seemingly only in select districts.  We are having a Special Public meeting to hear from the DOE about their plans.
                I am happy to talk to any parent of the districts that are being targeted by the DOE about the D6 experience.  My contact information is below.
                -Tory Frye (CEC6)



                On May 25, 2013, at 4:17 PM, Lisa Donlan wrote:

                 

                Hi Carrie, 


                It sure is complicated and each community, as you point out, is very different, with varying needs, options, geographies, demographics, histories and values. Here are some basic talking points from 

                The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education: 

                A collaborative initiative between parents in Community School Districts 1 and 3 and New York Appleseed, a nonprofit organization

                 

                If DOE has proposed “dezoning” in your district, the CEC should make sure it has all the facts before making a decision, and we would like to help.


                ·         The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education believes that student assignment policy is a powerful tool for increasing equity of access to educational opportunity and reducing segregation by race, class and language status.  We are concerned that simply dezoning your district without incorporating mechanisms to address community concerns may not get you what you want.

                ·         The DOE has presented the District CEC with a stark choice between retaining the system of attendance zones or removing them in favor of “open enrollment” or “pure choice.”  Unfortunately both of these methods of student assignment lead to inequity of access and racial and economic segregation in our schools.

                ·         There are other, more equitable models of student assignment that DOE has NOT presented.  We have significant research and resources relating to these models in our work in other districts and would like to share them with the community and the CEC before any final decisions are made. These models exist not only in other cities, but right here in New York City. 

                ·         We believe that communities can advocate for student-assignment policies that increase equity of access and diversity in our schools: 

                o   Parents in Districts 1 and 3, for instance, are building community support for a system of choice that would incorporate diversity values. 

                o   Parents in District 13 worked with the DOE to create a student-assignment plan for an unzoned school in Park Slope, Brooklyn that will preserve access for low-income students and English Language Learners.

                ·         We would be happy to attend an upcoming meeting and spend 30 minutes with you sharing our work and learning more about yours.  We hope to learn more about your goals and offer support to you in the form of resources we have gathered to develop and promote equitable and fair assignment practices in our communities. 

                 

                Please don’t hesitate to contact:

                Yasmin at ygs203@...  or 646-584-2013

                or Lisa at lisabdonlan@... or 212-677-9789

                or David at dtipson@... or 212-848-5468

                ( after 6/3, when he returns from vacation)


                To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                From: brooklynite282@...
                Date: Sat, 25 May 2013 14:29:59 -0400
                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5

                 
                As a non-educator and as a parent who knows next to nothing about all of this, it'd be great if someone could develop talking points for parents and community members in the other districts listed here. I'm in District 17, in a neighborhood (Prospect Lefferts Gardens) where nearly all professional parents send their kids outside the district, to a particular choice school in the district, or to private school. In a neighborhood where the zoned schools have 85 to 96% of students in poverty, arguing against choice will be an uphill battle. But if we had better information and alternatives for improving equity, it might help prevent this from happening.

                carrie





                Victoria (Tory) Frye
                vicnyc@...
                646-418-6435


              • Jim Devor
                Carrie, I am one of the proud parents of the Targeted Admissions program that was adopted for a newly constructed school (serving BOTH D15 and D13) which gives
                Message 8 of 9 , May 26, 2013
                  Carrie,

                  I am one of the proud parents of the Targeted Admissions program that
                  was adopted for a newly constructed school (serving BOTH D15 and D13) which gives admissions priority to ELL children and/or those eligible for FRPL. As Lisa can affirm, that program was adopted over the initial opposition of Tweed. As president of CEC-15, I would also be quite willing to speak at your Council on the subject.

                  More broadly, the DoE's dezoning campaign is just a part of its larger effort to eliminate the roles of neighborhood or communities from public education altogether. Thus, we see the destruction of Community School Districts as overseers of local schools in favor of networks having no geographic identity whatsoever. Likewise, we are seeing the rise of entire Charter School systems (expecting to cover the entire pre-K to 122 spectrum) that explicitly see themselves as separate and apart from the NYC Public School system (except, of course, for usurping public school space).

                  All of this is intended to remove any parent of community input from the actual conduct or governance of local schools. After all, they reason, such "interference" is unacceptably "political" (their strongest epithet). Better that such decisions be left to "professionals" (preferably without actual educational experience) who will remain (with the rare exceptions of lightning rods like Walcott or Moskowitz)relatively anonymous and unreachable.

                  It is that profoundly undemocratic and dystopian future of "choice" and "accountability" that Tweed is striving towards. Their proposed dezoning - especially in impoverished communities of color is very much a part of that agenda. It musst be stopped.
                  ___________________________
                  Jim Devor; President CEC-15 Follow me on Twitter: @JimDevor


                  --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Donlan <lisabdonlan@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Carrie,
                  > It sure is complicated and each community, as you point out, is very different, with varying needs, options, geographies, demographics, histories and values. Here are some basic talking points from The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education: A collaborative initiative between parents in Community School Districts 1 and 3 and New York Appleseed, a nonprofit organization If DOE has proposed "dezoning" in your district, the CEC should make sure it has all the facts before making a decision, and we would like to help.
                  > · The Project for Fairness & Equity in Education believes that student assignment policy is a powerful tool for increasing equity of access to educational opportunity and reducing segregation by race, class and language status. We are concerned that simply dezoning your district without incorporating mechanisms to address community concerns may not get you what you want.· The DOE has presented the District CEC with a stark choice between retaining the system of attendance zones or removing them in favor of "open enrollment" or "pure choice." Unfortunately both of these methods of student assignment lead to inequity of access and racial and economic segregation in our schools.· There are other, more equitable models of student assignment that DOE has NOT presented. We have significant research and resources relating to these models in our work in other districts and would like to share them with the community and the CEC before any final decisions are made. These models exist not only in other cities, but right here in New York City. · We believe that communities can advocate for student-assignment policies that increase equity of access and diversity in our schools: o Parents in Districts 1 and 3, for instance, are building community support for a system of choice that would incorporate diversity values. o Parents in District 13 worked with the DOE to create a student-assignment plan for an unzoned school in Park Slope, Brooklyn that will preserve access for low-income students and English Language Learners.· We would be happy to attend an upcoming meeting and spend 30 minutes with you sharing our work and learning more about yours. We hope to learn more about your goals and offer support to you in the form of resources we have gathered to develop and promote equitable and fair assignment practices in our communities. Please don't hesitate to contact:Yasmin at ygs203@... or 646-584-2013or Lisa at lisabdonlan@... or 212-677-9789or David at dtipson@... or 212-848-5468( after 6/3, when he returns from vacation)To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: brooklynite282@...
                  > Date: Sat, 25 May 2013 14:29:59 -0400
                  > Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5
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                  > As a non-educator and as a parent who knows next to nothing about all of this, it'd be great if someone could develop talking points for parents and community members in the other districts listed here. I'm in District 17, in a neighborhood (Prospect Lefferts Gardens) where nearly all professional parents send their kids outside the district, to a particular choice school in the district, or to private school. In a neighborhood where the zoned schools have 85 to 96% of students in poverty, arguing against choice will be an uphill battle. But if we had better information and alternatives for improving equity, it might help prevent this from happening.
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                  > carrie
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                • Francine Streich
                  Thanks
                  Message 9 of 9 , May 29, 2013
                    Thanks

                    On May 25, 2013, at 4:01 PM, "Leonie Haimson" <leonie@...> wrote:

                     

                    Sonja and others:  I wrote a memo for D6 which some members found helpful when they were initially considering dezoning; it is posted here:

                     

                    http://www.classsizematters.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Memorandum-D6.pdf

                     

                     

                    Among other things, it would allow the DOE to close any school  in the district and put a charter in its place, and essential eliminate the sole legal authority a CEC now has which is to approve changes in zoning lines.

                     

                    Leonie Haimson

                    Executive Director

                    Class Size Matters

                    124 Waverly Pl.

                    New York, NY 10011

                    212-674-7320

                    leonie@...

                    www.classsizematters.org

                    http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

                    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

                     

                    Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

                     

                    Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                     

                    Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                     

                    From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sonja jones
                    Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 11:25 AM
                    To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [nyceducationnews] Elementary Choice Town Hall Meeting - District 5 [1 Attachment]

                     

                     

                    [Attachment(s) from sonja jones included below]

                    If there are representatives from CEC 3, 4, 6 and 7 on this list-serve, please contact me off-line (at sjones12099@...) as CEC 5 would greatly appreciate your presence at our Elementary Choice Town Hall meeting scheduled for May 30th at 6;00 PM to share your experience, view and voices on this matter.

                     

                    All interested parties are encouraged to attend to hear pertinent information as it relates to the proposal to dezone elementary schools within the geographical confines of District 5.  We have already confirmed representation from District 1 (thanks Lisa) and would love to hear from other districts that have approved dezoning and/or been approached by the DOE regarding dezoning.

                     

                    Thank you in advance for your support on this....

                     

                    _____________

                    Sonja Jones

                    President

                    Community Education Council - District 5

                    425 West 123rd Street

                    New York, New York 10027

                    Phone: (212) 769-7500, x234

                    Fax: (212) 769-7619

                    E-Mail: cec5@schools.nyc.gov

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