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Re: [nyceducationnews] Fwd: PEN Weekly NewsBlast for August 31, 2007

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  • nealhugh@aol.com
    Effective Principal leadership is the #1 factor. We found that out in NYS in 1970 with the Fleischmann Commission. And high academic standards explains schools
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2007
      Effective Principal leadership is the #1 factor. We found that out in NYS in 1970 with the Fleischmann Commission.
      And high academic standards explains schools like Stuyvesant HS, irrespective of Principals there!

      Low income is not a predictor alone, viz Asian populations, and even Stuyvesant has almost 20% eligible for free lunch.

      Bill Cosby and Jennifer Lopez should start schools.

      Best, Neal
      ###

      SPECIFIC SCHOOL FEATURES LINKED TO ELEMENTARY ACHIEVEMENT SCORES
      Three elements of elementary school environments -- strong principal leadership,
      high academic standards, and frequent teacher meetings to plan instruction
      --
      are associated with higher third grade math and reading scores, according to a
      new research brief from Child Trends. Schools with a fourth element -- low
      teacher turnover
      -- generally have better behaved children.

      Higher teacher turnover, which can indicate an unstable school, is related to lower rates of
      student self-control and school engagement among third grade students.

      Using data from the Early Childhood longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a
      nationally representative sample of more than 20,000 children who started
      kindergarten in fall 1998, researchers found that many children do not
      experience key elements in their schools that maximize their learning outcomes:
      30 percent of all children attend elementary schools that do not have strong
      principal leadership; just over half of all children are in schools where their
      teachers meet together regularly to plan sequenced and coordinated instruction;
      and, 15 percent of children are in schools where teacher turnover is a problem.
       
      The findings show that low-income children are more likely to attend schools
      with poor learning environments.
      Children living below 100 percent of the
      federal poverty line are twice as likely as children with family incomes over
      200 percent of the poverty line to attend schools with low academic standards
      (20 percent versus 10 percent). Similar disparities in teacher turnover are
      found by children's race/ethnicity.

      Over 20 percent of black and Hispanic children go to schools where teacher turnover is troubling versus 11 percent of
      white non-Hispanic students.

      http://www.childtrends.org/_pressrelease_page.cfm?LID=B4864B83-282E-4926-843260B5D160C349

      Neal H. Hurwitz
      646-884-0594




      -----Original Message-----
      From: RichardEdBarr@...
      To: district3parents@yahoogroups.com; nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, 1 Sep 2007 1:12 am
      Subject: [nyceducationnews] Fwd: PEN Weekly NewsBlast for August 31, 2007

       




      Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL.com.
      Attached Message
      From:Public Education Network <PEN@...>
      To:richardedbarr@...
      Subject:PEN Weekly NewsBlast for August 31, 2007
      Date:Thu, 30 Aug 2007 22:13:14 -0700

      Public Education Network Weekly NewsBlast
      "Public Involvement. Public Education. Public Benefit."
      =========================================
      ***To read a colorful online version of the NewsBlast with a larger typeface,
      visit:
      http://www.publiceducation.org/newsblast_current.asp

      SCHOOLS GET TOUGHER ON MILITARY RECRUITERS
      The Pittsburgh school board has tightened restrictions on recruiters who visit
      district high schools, but didn't go as far as some members wanted. The policy
      change, which was approved despite one "no" vote, was driven by concerns about
      high-pressure tactics by military recruiters. Because federal law requires the
      military have the same access as other recruiters, the change also affects
      companies and colleges who court students at high schools. In Pittsburgh Public
      Schools, recruiters now must register with an administrator after arriving at a
      school. The board banned recruiters from using contests, drawings or lotteries,
      or from giving money or gifts, except minor promotional items or scholarships.
      In a move that predominantly affects military recruiters, the board banned
      exhibits or video games depicting weapons or violence. The board also ordered
      the creation of a system for logging complaints about recruiters, reports Joe
      Smydo for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Over objections from two board members,
      the board cut two provisions from the proposed policy. One would have limited
      recruiters from a given organization to four visits per high school per year;
      the other would have banned recruiters from serving as tutors or mentors, unless
      they were parents. While the board at previous meetings considered banning
      recruiting in cafeterias and hallways, the policy doesn't go that far.
      Principals will determine where recruiters may interact with students.
      http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07235/811539-298.stm

      ARE YOUR JEANS SAGGING? GO DIRECTLY TO JAIL
      Jamarcus Marshall, a 17-year-old high school sophomore in Mansfield, La.,
      believes that no one should be able to tell him how low to wear his jeans. "It’s
      up to the person who’s wearing the pants," he said. Mr. Marshall’s sagging
      pants, a style popularized in the early 1990s by hip-hop artists, are becoming a
      criminal offense in a growing number of communities, including his own. Starting
      in Louisiana, an intensifying push by lawmakers has determined pants worn low
      enough to expose underwear poses a threat to the public, and they have enacted
      indecency ordinances to stop it. Since June 11, sagging pants have been against
      the law in Delcambre, La., a town of 2,231 that is 80 miles southwest of Baton
      Rouge. The style carries a fine of as much as $500 or up to a six-month
      sentence, reports Niko Koppel for The New York Times. "We used to wear long
      hair, but I don't think our trends were ever as bad as sagging," said Mayor
      Carol Broussard. An ordinance in Mansfield, a town of 5,496 near Shreveport,
      subjects offenders to a fine (as much as $150 plus court costs) or jail time (up
      to 15 days). Police Chief Don English said the law, which takes effect Sept. 15,
      will set a good civic image. Behind the indecency laws may be the real issue --
      the hip-hop style itself, which critics say is worn as a badge of delinquency,
      with its distinctive walk conveying thuggish swagger and a disrespect for
      authority. Also at work is the larger issue of freedom of expression and the
      questions raised when fashion moves from being merely objectionable to illegal.
      Sagging began in prison, where oversized uniforms were issued without belts to
      prevent suicide and their use as weapons. The style spread through rappers and
      music videos, from the ghetto to the suburbs and around the world. Following a
      pattern of past fashion bans, the sagging prohibitions are seen by some as
      racially motivated because the wearers are young, predominantly African-American
      men. Yet, this legislation has been proposed largely by African-American
      officials.
      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/30/fashion/30baggy.html

      SCHOOLS OFFERING DAY CARE CENTERS
      Many urban school districts have day care centers attached to some schools. In
      Washington, D.C., five schools have day care facilities, including Bell
      Multicultural, a bustling high school that serves about 800 students. Doris
      Briones credits Bell's day care center with allowing her to graduate last
      spring. She is now enrolled in a college-prep program. "When I got pregnant, I
      was really depressed. I thought that everything was gone already for me," she
      said. "This day care center helped me through four years of school. By taking
      care of my child and letting me have the opportunity to study, here I am."
      Bell's principal, Maria Tukeva, decided to add the center to the school a few
      years ago. First, she had to overcome her fear that providing free day care --
      just off the main corridor, for everybody to see -- might make parenting look
      desirable or easy. To counter that message, she asks the teenage moms to
      participate in a pregnancy prevention program. About 80 day care centers
      attached to public schools have gone through the rigorous process of earning
      accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young People,
      reports Nancy Zuckerbrod for the Associated Press. Pregnant girls often have to
      be prodded to stay in school, even with the availability of day care. One in
      four girls who drop out of school does so because she is pregnant or a parent,
      according to a survey by the Gates Foundation. Very few boys who drop out cite
      that reason. Studies indicate that when teenage parents go on to earn high
      school degrees, the odds increase that their children will finish school.
      Research shows children of teenage mothers lag behind other children when it
      comes to school readiness, language development and communication and
      interpersonal skills. But studies also show that providing disadvantaged
      children with high-quality preschool can narrow those differences.
      http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/08/25/ap4053918.html

      BAPTISTS TURN FROM PUBLIC SCHOOLS
      Convinced that God has been erased from public schools, Southern Baptists are
      now working to open their own schools, where Jesus is writ large and Bible study
      is part of the daily curriculum. Church leaders are not calling for a wholesale
      exodus from public schools, which would be a monumental hit, considering that
      Southern Baptists make up the nation's largest Protestant denomination with 16
      million members. Rather, they talk about alternatives to public schools capable
      of educating a new generation ready and willing to advocate for biblical
      principles rather than popular culture. "In the public schools, you don't just
      have neutrality, you have hostility toward organized religion," said Daniel
      Akin, president of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest,
      N.C. "A lot of parents are fed up." Southeastern is leading the push, sponsoring
      a Christian School 101 workshop, reports Yonat Shimron for The News Observer
      (Charlotte, N.C.). The program is designed to train church leaders to open
      private schools. At Southeastern and elsewhere, Southern Baptists have become
      convinced that fighting to change the system is futile. They say public schools
      have long demonstrated a commitment to teaching evolution over creationism,
      world faiths over Christianity, sex education over abstinence, moral relativism
      over Christian claims of truth. Southern Baptist leaders are careful to
      reiterate that they have no desire to harm the public schools or offend its
      workers, many of whom are proud Southern Baptists. And indeed, many Southern
      Baptists are quite happy with their children's public education. "Enloe High
      School is a great school," said Thomas Dresser, referring to the Raleigh public
      school that his daughter, Virginia, attends. "It's real diverse, and there's
      lots of opportunities. I think it's possible to get a good education about your
      faith at home. It's not essential you get it at school."
      http://www.newsobserver.com/news/education/story/683001.html

      CELEBRATE THE WEEK OF THE CLASSROOM TEACHER & WORLD TEACHERS’ DAY
      Recognition is important. It's your turn to acknowledge our children's
      educators. Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) has
      designated September 30-October 6, 2007, as a special week to officially applaud
      our children's educators, and has joined with over 100 countries in recognizing
      World Teachers' Day. Teachers are vitally important to the development and
      success of all children, and they deserve our appreciation and support. Teachers
      not only devote their time and energy to students, they often donate a portion
      of their income. Teachers spend an average of $475 a year on their students,
      reports Quality Education Data, Inc., an education market research and database
      firm. ACEI offers free materials to help communities implement their own
      celebrations for the Week of the Classroom Teacher and World Teachers' Day. A
      detailed planning guide filled with suggestions, and materials, such as
      bookmarks, certificates, thank you notes, and sample letters, can be found at:
      http://www.acei.org/wcthp.htm

      PART-TIME CAFETERIA WORKERS VS. HUNGRY KIDS
      The Los Angeles Unified School District receives about $2.85 a child a day from
      the state and federal governments to provide breakfast and lunch to students. Of
      that amount, according to the nonprofit group California Food Policy Advocates,
      or CFPA, about $2 must be spent on milk, supplies, salaries and benefits,
      leaving about 85 cents for the food on your child's Styrofoam tray. Given this
      paltry budget, it seems astounding that our children are fed at all, yet L.A.
      Unified's food service manages to serve nearly half a million meals each school
      day, and it does so within or exceeding U.S. Agriculture Department nutrition
      guidelines. Part-time food service employees are seeking the same health
      benefits -- including coverage for their families -- that their full-time
      counterparts enjoy. Extending these benefits to cafeteria staff who currently
      work only three hours a day would cost an estimated $40 million a year,
      according to school board calculations. Nowhere in the private sector do
      three-hour-a-day employees expect to be eligible for full family benefits;
      nowhere but in the surreal world of L.A. Unified would anyone have the nerve to
      ask for them, writes L.J. Williamson in the Los Angeles Times. This is fat that
      the food service's too-lean budget simply doesn't have available. If health
      benefits were extended to these part-time workers, the CFPA estimates it would
      mean that the per-plate meal budget would be reduced from 85 cents to 49 cents.
      Making healthy food available for that amount would take a miracle of biblical
      proportions. So we'd be improving the healthcare of nearly 2,000 part-time
      workers at the expense of the 500,000 children who eat in public school
      cafeterias every day.
      http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe-williamson28aug28,0,7493181.story?coll=la-opinion-rightrail

      CHOOSING MORE TIME FOR STUDENTS: THE WHAT, WHY & HOW OF EXPANDED LEARNING
      A crescendo of support from education researchers, analysts, reform advocates,
      and lawmakers about the need for additional learning time for our nation's
      under-performing students may well result in the coming months in meaningful
      reform. In fact, U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings believes that
      the expansion of learning time will be the next major push in school reform. The
      reason: our nation's public school students need to meet the demands and
      challenges of the 21st century but they simply cannot in public school systems
      that remain much the same as they were 50 years ago. The shift in educational
      rigor that globalization has ushered in is pushing policymakers to embrace
      systemic change in public education, writes Elena Rocha for the Center for
      American Progress, with particular focus on closing achievement gaps between
      disadvantaged students and their peers. In rethinking what it will take for our
      public schools to better serve students who are academically behind, wisdom tell
      us that a comprehensive approach that encompasses numerous options will provide
      the best opportunity to support student learning. The expansion of learning time
      can serve as one effective vehicle to modernize our schools because it allows
      teachers, principals, community organizations and leaders, and parents to build
      multiple curriculums to best educate our children to succeed in the 21st
      century. Expanded learning time turns dissatisfaction with the limitations of
      the current six-hour, 180-day school year into a proactive strategy that will
      create a new school structure for children.
      http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2007/08/extended_learning_report.html

      SCHOOLS PUSH GIFTED STUDENTS TO THRIVE
      Some of Florida’s brightest elementary students often get a few hours each week
      to get advanced learning with their true peers -- those who also have scored at
      least 130 on an intelligence test. The rest of the time, these students --
      identified as gifted -- are in regular classrooms. Parents say their children
      are being stifled and not getting the "free and appropriate" education the state
      promises. As parents of gifted children throughout the nation have started to
      become more vocal about their children's education, educators are starting to
      review gifted programs, reports Colleen Wixon for the Treasure Coast Palm
      (Fla.). Some elementary schools in Martin and St. Lucie counties offer full-time
      programs, in which gifted children learn together throughout the day. Indian
      River County and other Treasure Coast schools offer a "pull out" program, where
      a gifted teacher works with students once a week. The teacher for gifted
      students in Indian River County often travels to several different schools each
      week. By high school, gifted programs are almost non-existent. Educators say
      that's because students need to fit other classes into their schedules. The
      state also is considering changes to its gifted program, including how much
      money it gives to districts for the program and how a student qualifies.
      Currently, an intelligence test is used to determine eligibility, but some have
      suggested using Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores instead. Although
      some gifted children are self-motivated to challenge themselves, others
      sometimes become disenchanted with school and learning. Advocates for gifted
      students say some don't learn proper study habits because they pick up lessons
      quickly and then have to wait for the rest of the class to get the material.
      http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2007/jul/30/30schools-push-gifted-students-to-thrive/

      MARCHING BAND ESPECIALLY STRENUOUS IN SUMMER HEAT
      Imagine hiking around in the hot sun for hours carrying as much as 20 pounds of
      dead weight while blowing up a balloon, and you've got some idea of what August
      is like at marching band camp. Marching band members may not generally be
      considered athletes, but students do get a good workout, often in the heat, cold
      or mud. Members of the color guard even dance while waving flags or twirling
      batons for much of the band's performance, reports Amy Neff Roth for Healthy
      Living magazine. "It's a very aerobic activity," said Martin Hollister, director
      of the New Hartford (N.Y.) Senior High School Marching Spartans. Band member
      Nick Decker, a rising senior, admits that three-hour practices in the August
      heat carrying a Sousaphone aren't the easiest. The National Athletic Trainers'
      Association (NATA) takes marching band seriously, noting the physical challenges
      of standing in formation for long periods, wearing heavy uniforms in warm
      weather and carrying instruments. Last August, NATA urged schools to take
      precautions to protect band members' health. NATA's recommendations include:
      medical exams for band members, training and stretching, plenty of hydration
      during practices, instruction in ergonomically correct methods of holding
      instruments, formation of an emergency plan and a well-stocked first-aid kit on
      hand. Hollister said there's definitely more awareness of these health issues
      than there was in years past. He and other band staff stress hydration during
      hot weather; students to bring their own water and parents stand by with water
      jugs, he said. The band also is inclusive, working hard to find places for
      people that match their physical ability. For example, a few years ago, a girl
      who used a wheelchair played in the non-marching ensemble, Hollister said.
      http://www.healthylivingny.com/stories/story1.htm

      CHALLENGES IN REPLICATING SUCCESSFUL CHARTER SCHOOLS
      The rapid national expansion of Green Dot Public Schools and the Knowledge is
      Power Program (KIPP) highlights the great potential for such organizations to
      provide more high-quality public schools by replicating successful charter
      schools. However, two new publications from the National Charter School Research
      Project make clear that efforts to quickly expand successful charter schools
      through "managed growth" will not be easy. "Quantity Counts: The Growth of
      Charter School Management Organizations" shows that replicating successful
      charter schools has been tougher and more costly than expected for both
      for-profit and nonprofit charter management organizations (EMOs and CMOs). The
      report analyzes why this is so and offers strategies to help new management
      organizations shorten their learning curves and avoid problems encountered by
      pioneering management organizations. The report documents problems that go well
      beyond the legal and political barriers thrown up by charter school opponents.
      Management organizations (MOs) have struggled more with start-up and quality
      control issues than they thought they would --issues such as dealing with local
      politics; recruiting and training principals and teachers; and figuring out how
      much centralization and standardization is necessary. "Identifying and
      Replicating the "DNA" of Successful Charter Schools: Lessons from the Private
      Sector" summarizes lessons from the business and nonprofit sectors’ experiences
      with replicating complex organizations and applies those lessons to charter
      school scale-up efforts. Even in the business world, where replication is
      arguably a more straightforward process, the majority of such efforts fail.
      Together, these two publications offer helpful recommendations as well as pose
      challenging questions about how to help communities find or create alternatives
      to persistently failing schools.
      http://www.ncsrp.org/cs/csr/print/csr_docs/pubs_list.htm

      SPECIFIC SCHOOL FEATURES LINKED TO ELEMENTARY ACHIEVEMENT SCORES
      Three elements of elementary school environments -- strong principal leadership,
      high academic standards, and frequent teacher meetings to plan instruction --
      are associated with higher third grade math and reading scores, according to a
      new research brief from Child Trends. Schools with a fourth element -- low
      teacher turnover -- generally have better behaved children. Higher teacher
      turnover, which can indicate an unstable school, is related to lower rates of
      student self-control and school engagement among third grade students. Using
      data from the Early Childhood longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a
      nationally representative sample of more than 20,000 children who started
      kindergarten in fall 1998, researchers found that many children do not
      experience key elements in their schools that maximize their learning outcomes:
      30 percent of all children attend elementary schools that do not have strong
      principal leadership; just over half of all children are in schools where their
      teachers meet together regularly to plan sequenced and coordinated instruction;
      and, 15 percent of children are in schools where teacher turnover is a problem.
      The findings show that low-income children are more likely to attend schools
      with poor learning environments. Children living below 100 percent of the
      federal poverty line are twice as likely as children with family incomes over
      200 percent of the poverty line to attend schools with low academic standards
      (20 percent versus 10 percent). Similar disparities in teacher turnover are
      found by children's race/ethnicity. Over 20 percent of black and Hispanic
      children go to schools where teacher turnover is troubling versus 11 percent of
      white non-Hispanic students.
      http://www.childtrends.org/_pressrelease_page.cfm?LID=B4864B83-282E-4926-843260B5D160C349

      FLORIDA LEADS GROWTH IN VIRTUAL SCHOOLING
      Virtual learning is becoming ubiquitous at colleges and universities but
      remains, in many ways, in its infancy at the elementary and secondary level,
      where skeptics have questioned such factors as its cost and its effect on
      children's socialization. Virtual schools are growing fast, though, at an annual
      rate of about 25 percent. Estimates of elementary and secondary students taking
      virtual classes range from 500,000 to 1 million nationally, compared with total
      public school enrollment of about 50 million. There are now 25 statewide or
      state-led programs and more than 170 virtual charter schools across the nation,
      according to the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL). FLVS is a
      pioneer and a model for many of these other programs. FLVS, part of the
      Florida's public education system, is the leader among K-12 virtual schools in
      terms of innovation, depth of courses, rigor, and enrollment, said Bill Tucker,
      chief operating officer at Education Sector, a Washington, D.C., think tank.
      Founded 10 years ago, it offers more than 90 courses ranging from such basics as
      English and math, to specialties that include keyboarding, computer programming,
      web design, Chinese, marine science, Earth-space science, macroeconomics, and
      microeconomics. Advocates say virtual learning has almost unlimited potential,
      reports eSchool News, although some have raised questions about funding and the
      amount of social interaction that students receive from such schooling.
      http://www.eschoolnews.org/news/showStoryts.cfm?ArticleID=7315

      PHOTOGRAPHY IS A REVELATION & LEARNING TOOL FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED STUDENTS
      What would children who are blind show us about the world if they learned to
      take pictures? The question first occurred to photographer Tony Deifell in 1991,
      soon after graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
      where he studied anthropology. A year later, he sought an answer by setting up
      an experimental photography program, called Sound Shadows, at Governor Morehead
      School for the Blind, in Raleigh, N.C. The state-funded Governor Morehead is
      North Carolina's only school for the visually impaired; established in 1845, it
      is one of the oldest in the United States. Sound Shadows was based there for
      five years, from 1992 to 1997, during which time Deifell co-taught 36 students
      ages 12-19 with visual impairments. The kids not only learned how to point and
      shoot, they also were taught how to use a camera to re-create dreams and express
      personal vision, writes Alexei Bien for Edutopia. With autofocus cameras, the
      students used sound as an informant, and touch as a way to compose their images.
      But to envision the photographs -- to assess them and learn from them --
      required the teachers and students to discuss the prints. The teachers would
      faithfully report what they saw in each picture, and the students merged those
      descriptions with what they had perceived or imagined while in the field. Parker
      J. Palmer, a nationally recognized educator and author, concurs: "Education
      bears a terrific responsibility for cultivating wide seeing or narrow seeing.
      It's not an unfair generalization that our colleges and universities turn out
      way too many people who have power in the world, but no insight or vision, no
      cultivated way of seeing its possibilities, or what it is that's driving them."
      The camera served the school's students inside the classroom too. "You don't
      need vision to have a learning disability," says Governor Morehead teacher
      Shirley Hand. "Dyslexia in Braille is the same as dyslexia in print." Linking
      photography with creative writing assignments about dreams, fears, and vocations
      was!
      a way f
      or Hand and others to increase literacy and draw students closer to the dreaded
      Braille writer, which is complicated to learn. What can children who are blind
      show us about the world once they learn to take pictures? Above all, Rosen says,
      "The photos insist on leaving behind preconceived ideas about people without
      sight, and seeing how enlightened they are, and how they shed light on our
      world."
      http://www.edutopia.org/sound-shadows-photography-visually-impaired

      AS A NATION HEADS BACK TO SCHOOL, A LOOK AT THE NUMBERS
      School is beginning or already under way for fully one in four American
      youngsters and adults enrolled in the nation’s more than 95,000 public
      elementary and secondary schools, 3,200 charter schools and nearly 4,300
      degree-granting colleges, as well as for the 1.1 million who are home-schooled.
      The United States Census Bureau has computed dozens of statistics like these
      about the school year, reports Sam Roberts for The New York Times. This month
      alone, it found Americans will spend an estimated $7.1 billion on shopping at
      family clothing stores and $2.1 billion at bookstores, much of it presumably for
      back-to-school purchases. It is a volume that is exceeded only around the winter
      holidays.
      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/29/education/29school.html

      |--------------- NEW GRANT AND FUNDING INFORMATION--------------|

      "Breakthroughs in Inclusive Education"
      The TASH Breakthroughs in Inclusive Education Awards program honors important
      contributions of individuals and school districts in advancing inclusive
      education and equitable opportunities for students in grades K-12, particularly
      those with the most significant disabilities and support needs. Awardees will be
      selected from these categories: Inclusive Education Administrator of the Year;
      Inclusive Education Teacher of the Year; Inclusive Education Advocate of the
      Year; Most Promising Inclusive School; and, Most Promising Inclusive School
      District. Maximum Award: recognition; a library of books about inclusive best
      practices from Brookes Publishing. Eligibility: school districts and education
      professionals that work inclusively with students K-12 with disabilities.
      Deadline: September 20, 2007.
      http://www.tash.org/2007tash/Awards.htm

      "Awards Recognize School District Best Practices"
      American School Board Journal (ASBJ) is accepting nominations online for the
      2008 Magna Awards through October 1, 2007. Presented in cooperation with Sodexho
      School Services, winners of the Magna Awards receive national recognition in a
      special supplement to ASBJ and are honored at a luncheon at the National School
      Boards Association's annual conference. Awards are handed out in three
      enrollment categories -- under 5,000, 5,001 to 20,000, and more than 20,000.
      Grand prize winners in each category receive a $3,500 cash award from Sodexho.
      Nominations this year are being accepted only on an online basis. For more
      information, call (703) 838-6739.
      http://www.asbj.com/magna/

      "Youth Service America Harris Wofford Awards"
      Youth Service America Harris Wofford awards annually honor exceptional
      individuals, institutions, and media figures who actively contribute to this
      nation's spirit of service. Eligibility: Youth (ages 5-25), Organization
      (nonprofit, corporate, foundation), and Media (organization or individual).
      Maximum Award: $500 individual award and a $500 award for the nonprofit
      organization of his/her choice. Deadline: October 19, 2007.
      http://servenet.org/DesktopModules/iBN%20News%20Articles/Download.aspx?AttachmentID=44

      "U.S. News & World Report and AXA Foundation AXA Achievement Scholarships"
      U.S. News & World Report and AXA Foundation AXA Achievement Scholarships,
      provide resources that help make college possible for qualified students.
      Maximum Award: $15,000; a laptop computer; the offer of an AXA Financial
      Services internship. Eligibility: high school students from all 50 states plus
      the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico who will graduate in 2008. Deadline:
      December 15, 2007.
      http://www.axaonline.com/rs/axa/about-us/33a_National_Initiatives.html

      "Courageous Legislator Award Honors Legislators Who Support Public Education"
      The SchoolMatch Institute and the Public Education Support Group Courageous
      Legislator Award honors legislators who courageously support public education.
      Deadline for nominations: January 1, 2008. Additional information is available
      from Dr. M. Donald Thomas at: mariothomas1@... or Dr. William L.
      Bainbridge at: bainbridge@...

      For a detailed listing of EXISTING GRANT OPPORTUNITIES (updated each week),
      visit:
      http://www.publiceducation.org/newsblast_grants.asp

      QUOTE OF THE WEEK

      "Proposals to solve students' academic problems abound, but many are simplistic.
      South Carolina has long favored such approaches in public policy. Human bondage
      would fuel economic development. Secession would free South Carolina of the
      federal yoke. Racial oppression and segregation would preserve ‘our way of
      life.’ Low taxes would attract industry. Providing a ‘minimally adequate
      education’ will secure the state's future. Now comes school choice. Some
      African-American leaders are tempted by the prospect of state financial support,
      one way or another, for constituents to choose private schools for their
      children. Perhaps they genuinely believe this will improve the education of the
      more than 275,000 African-American students in South Carolina's public schools.
      It may be just as likely they are focusing on the relatively small number who
      attend or may attend private schools operated by some African-American churches.
      … All South Carolinians, not just African-Americans, should be enraged that too
      many children are failing to meet the state's academic standards. Where this is
      persistently the case, citizens should organize to demand and support
      improvements in their local public schools. …Separation, withdrawal, and
      isolation are anathema to authentic education. They did not serve
      African-American children well when required by law. They will not serve them
      well if sought by choice."
      -Hayes Mizell (school desegregation advocate)

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      Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail!
    • Elizabeth Green
      I am away on vacation and away from e-mail. I will return Sunday March 16. Talk to you then, Elizabeth
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 16, 2008
        Re: [nyceducationnews] Fwd: PEN Weekly NewsBlast for August 31, 2007 I am away on vacation and away from e-mail. I will return Sunday March 16.

        Talk to you then,
        Elizabeth
      • Elizabeth Green
        I am away on vacation and away from e-mail. I will return Sunday March 16. Talk to you then, Elizabeth
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 16, 2008
          Re: [nyceducationnews] Fwd: PEN Weekly NewsBlast for August 31, 2007 I am away on vacation and away from e-mail. I will return Sunday March 16.

          Talk to you then,
          Elizabeth
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