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Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: City's $80M Student Data System To Be Replaced by State Portal Updated

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  • Falik - MSN
    I ve developed a database system or two for small companies such as Exxon and Mobil. I just can not comprehend how one could spend $80 million on ARIS. A
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 31, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I've developed a database system or two for small companies such as Exxon and Mobil.  I just can not comprehend how one could spend $80 million on ARIS.  A database is, after all, a relatively simple project.  There are, so far as I am aware, no complex mathematical or algorhythmic processes that are applied to the data.  It is simply data in and view it.
       
      A bit of analysis -
        # of simple data input pages                         _____ * work units = ______
        # of moderately complex data input pages     _____* work units = ______
        # of complex data input pages                       _____* work units = ______
        # of simple data display pages                     _____* work units = ______
        # of moderately complex data display pages _____* work units = ______
        # of complex data display pages                   _____* work units = ______
        # of simple reports                                       _____* work units = ______
        # of moderately complex reports                   _____* work units = ______
        # of complex reports                                    _____* work units = ______
      TOTAL WORK UNITS REQUIRED * $/WORK UNIT = project cost
       
      There are some overhead costs, but the above calculation should come very close to a reliable estimate.
      So, are the data available?
       
      Eugene Falik
       
       

      From: Ellen
      Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 5:54 PM
      Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: City's $80M Student Data System To Be Replaced by State Portal Updated

       

      800 million versus 19 million? Am I reading this wrong? how could the City have spent that much when the State is Klien on a spending so little? Or, did I miss the payment to Kleindoch?

      --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, "Leonie Haimson" <leonie@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > Here it says
      Wireless Gen, run by Klein and owned by Murdoch's NewsCorp, may
      > still be
      chosen to create the state data system despite contract being
      > vetoed by
      State Comptroller.
      >
      >
      > City's $80M Student Data System To
      Be Replaced by State Portal Updated July
      > 30, 2012 7:18am
      >
      >
      > July 30, 2012 7:18am | By Jill Colvin
      > <
      href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/jill-colvi">http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/jill-colvi
      >
      n> , Amy Zimmer
      > <
      href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/amy-zimmer">http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/amy-zimmer
      > >
      >
      > y)
      >
      > MANHATTAN - After spending more than
      $80 million on a controversial online
      > student achievement database, the
      NYC Department of Education
      > <
      href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/tags/department-of-education">http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/tags/department-of-education> 's portal is
      > about to become obsolete as the state rolls out its own
      nearly-identical
      > system as part of a federal education grant,
      DNAinfo.com New York has
      > learned.
      >
      > The city is quietly
      making the transition from its $81 million data system -
      > known as ARIS,
      or "Achievement Reporting and Innovation System" - to a new
      > statewide
      database being developed with federal education funding, according
      > to
      officials and city and state documents.
      >
      > ARIS, which was created
      and launched in 2008 to give parents, teachers and
      > principals access to
      test scores, attendance and student histories, is set
      > to be replaced in
      fall 2013 by the "State Longitudinal Data System" -
      > expected to be an
      almost identical copy of the city's own web portal,
      > officials
      said.
      >
      > Description: ARISThe city spent more than $80 million to
      develop ARIS for
      > students, teachers, parents and principals.
      (sso.nycenet.edu/)
      >
      > The statewide system was created using a
      $19.7 million, three-year Race to
      > the Top federal grant.
      >
      > "The goal is to transition to the state system once the state has the
      new
      > system," Erin Hughes, a spokeswoman for the city Education
      Department
      > confirmed to DNAinfo.
      >
      > News of the change
      came as a surprise even to the city's principals, many of
      > whom have been
      reluctant to accept the existing system.
      >
      > "There have been no
      indications that there will be any changes in a year,"
      > said a
      spokeswoman for the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators,
      >
      the principal's union, who insisted the transition was "not happening."
      >
      > Watchdog groups also railed against the Education Department's
      investment in
      > short-lived software.
      >
      > "Improving
      education through technology is vital, but spending nearly $100
      > million
      on an ineffective system is a huge waste of badly needed taxpayer
      >
      dollars," Comptroller John Liu
      > <
      href="http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.">http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.
      >
      shtm/> 's spokesman Matthew Sweeney said in a statement.
      >
      > A
      stinging report by Liu
      > <
      href="http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.">http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.
      >
      shtm/> earlier this year found that ARIS had failed to improve student
      > performance and that nearly half of instructors weren't even
      bothering to
      > use it. They were instead relying on other computer
      programs to track
      > student progress, such as DataCation <
      href="http://www.datacation.com/">http://www.datacation.com/> , which
      > some say is easier to use.
      >
      > "ARIS is just the
      latest IT project that has failed to live up to the DOE's
      > hype," Sweeney
      added.
      >
      > Hughes said the new system "should provide much of the
      same functionality at
      > a lower cost for the city" because the operating
      costs of the new system
      > will be covered by the state instead of the DOE,
      but declined to provide
      > specifics about how much might be saved.
      >
      > "The entire state is expected to participate, in part because of their
      [Race
      > to the Top] commitments," said Tom Dunn, a spokesman for the New
      York State
      > Education Department, who explained that the new system was
      in the process
      > of being contracted out to developers and scheduled to be
      up and running by
      > the fall of 2013.
      >
      > Dunn declined to
      comment further, citing a policy of not commenting during
      > an ongoing
      procurement process.
      >
      > City officials said the state's federal
      application specifically cited ARIS
      > as a template that it wanted to
      expand statewide.
      >
      > "The state's system is modeled on ARIS, and
      we are working with them closely
      > on its development," Hughes
      said.
      >
      > Some education advocates worried the state's move would
      only amplify a
      > flawed system.
      >
      > "I think the fetish about
      test score data collection is not only misplaced
      > but dangerous," said
      Leonie Haimson, executive director of Class Size
      > Matters <
      href="http://www.classsizematters.org/">http://www.classsizematters.org/> , who criticized the DOE for not
      > providing accurate data on other
      things, such as class size and
      > overcrowding.
      >
      > "They
      invest $80 million in this system. $80 million! Imagine what they
      > could
      have done with the money," said Zakiyah Ansari, advocacy director and
      > at
      the Alliance for Quality Education, who said she has plugged into the
      >
      ARIS system "maybe 5 or 10 times" over the years, despite having eight kids
      > in the public school system.
      >
      > She urged planners to
      consult and work collaborate with stakeholders as new
      > portal is being
      designed to avoid a repeat.
      >
      > Like its predecessor, the state's
      computer program has already encountered
      > delays, according to a Race to
      the Top NY Report Year One 2010 - 2011,
      > published by the U.S. Department
      of Education in January.
      >
      > ARIS was developed by IBM, but the
      contract was handed over at the beginning
      > of the year to Wireless
      Generation, a subsidiary of News Corporation run by
      > ex-Schools
      Chancellor Joel Klein.
      >
      > Wireless Generation had also originally
      been selected to build the new
      > statewide system, but State Comptroller
      Tom DiNapoli rejected the
      > <
      href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-educ">http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-educ
      >
      ation-contract-murdoch-firm-article-1.948688> $27 million contract last
      > summer,
      > <
      href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-educ">http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-educ
      >
      ation-contract-murdoch-firm-article-1.948688> citing concern about News
      > Corp.'s phone-hacking scandal
      > <
      href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/63532058/OSC-Letter-to-SED-8-25-11">http://www.scribd.com/doc/63532058/OSC-Letter-to-SED-8-25-11> .
      >
      > The city's new $9.3 million contract with Wireless, which
      went into effect
      > in January, is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2013, Liu's
      office said.
      >
      > Despite DiNapoli's decision last summer, Wireless
      could be chosen once again
      > to help build the state's database and, and
      some believe that, if selected,
      > they would be better able to merge the
      city's portal with the state's new
      > program.
      >
      > But it
      remained unclear how much of the legwork the city already put into
      >
      creating its system will be incorporated into the design of the new state
      > system.
      >
      > "ARIS is seven years old now, and the way
      these things go, technology
      > advances by leaps and bounds," said one
      education expert who spoke on the
      > condition of anonymity because of
      having "sensitive privileged" information
      > about the transition. "The
      DOE, as a general matter, had and has a bad habit
      > of scaling
      experimental projects" and said the city made a mistake by
      > investing so
      much money in what should have been a test run.
      >
      > There was a
      general consensus that ARIS was "an early start on computerized
      > student
      data systems," the expert said, "so it wouldn't be a surprise that
      > an
      initial investment of $80 million is now being adjusted based on the
      >
      state and federal governments getting on the bandwagon."
      >
      >
      > Read more:
      > <
      href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-da">http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-da
      >
      ta-system-be-replaced-by-state-portal#ixzz22E8pkFPV>
      >
      href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-dat">http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-dat
      >
      a-system-be-replaced-by-state-portal#ixzz22E8pkFPV
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Leonie Haimson
      >
      > Executive
      Director
      >
      > Class Size Matters
      >
      > 124 Waverly
      Pl.
      >
      > New York, NY 10011
      >
      > 212-674-7320
      >
      > <mailto:classsizematters@...> leonie@...
      >
      > <
      href="http://www.classsizematters.org/">http://www.classsizematters.org/> www.classsizematters.org
      >
      > <
      href="http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/">http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/>
      >
      http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com
      >
      > <
      href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson>
      >
      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson
      >
      >
      >
      > Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson
      >
      >
      >
      > Make a <
      href="http://www.nycharities.org/donate/c_donate.asp?CharityCode=1757">http://www.nycharities.org/donate/c_donate.asp?CharityCode=1757>
      >
      tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!
      >
      >
      >
      > Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing
      > <mailto:
      href="mailto:classsizematters-subscribe%40yahoogroups.com">classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com>
      >
      classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing
      > <mailto:
      href="mailto:nyceducationnews-subscribe%40yahoogroups.com">nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com>
      >
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      >

    • Lisa Donlan
      you mean the $80 million super mugging?http://www.juiceanalytics.com/writing/an-80-million-super-mugging/ An $80 Million Super-MuggingMarch 14, 2007By: Zach
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        you mean the $80 million super mugging?

        Ah, the sweet smell of a swindle. Don’t you just hate it when consulting companies cajole deals with hand-wringing about technology and, especially, preying on clients’ lack of expertise?

        I’ve seen some of these situations up close but nothing so ugly as this story.

        $80 million supercomputer to analyze NYC student achievement

        March 6, 2007, 7:58 AM EST NEW YORK (AP) — To understand student performance, the city will spend $80 million on a massive supercomputer that will crunch huge amounts of data and offer up-to-the-minute reports to teachers, principals and eventually parents, the Daily News reported Tuesday.

        One million students and no high-volume transactional data? That might be huge to Dr. Evilbut even by late 90’s standards that’s not huge. You want to talk huge? Now these are huge. The system that was sold to New York is more along the lines of a CRM system for a medium-sized insurance company.

        The “super” reference here is pure drive-through mentality. In the same way that we are a nation that’s overfed and undernourished, this is about a super-sized services contract that sits atop something that could be handled by a regular-sized computer.

        The information fed into the IBM-designed system called Aris, or “Achievement Reporting and Innovation System” could include existing data on students—such as gender, race and any disabilities—along with new data from incremental testing.

        Some aren’t so pleased with the system’s price tag.

        “You can lower a lot of class sizes with that money—or buy a lot of supplies,” teachers union President Randi Weingarten said in a statement obtained by the Daily News.

        Mayor Michael Bloomberg told the tabloid the cost was worth it.

        “Every child in this city deserves a quality education and we will spare no expense,” he said.

        This is where the sweet smell of swindle comes in. There is a difference between being willing to make the investment and having a no-bid contract.

        Jim Liebman, the Education Department’s chief accountability officer, also lauded the system.

        “Aris will bring together every bit of learning information that we have on every one of our 1.1 million students,” Liebman said. “Now, school professionals will be able to slice and dice that data to see what’s wrong.”

        Teachers are underpaid, hardly appreciated, and overworked. I can only wonder what the half-life is of a system that asks teachers to log on to get information delivered by the “chief accountability officer.”

        And from an article in InformationWeek, we’re enthralled by a description of the system capabilities:

        “Think of a teacher trying to help a student struggling with geometry,” says Michael Littlejohn, VP of public sector for IBM global services. “The teacher could tap into the system and search for best practices on geometry instruction, and get contact information for teachers identified as having strong skills in that area.”

        Sometimes it’s good to reinvent the wheel – usually when you’re trying to learn about wheels. But not when you’re drawing away cash from an entity that doesn’t have it to spare. Something like this could be built with off-the-shelf, mature products for a fraction of this wasted time and effort.

        Sure, a fully-integrated, one-stop solution is going to run up the price but the functionalitydoesn’t sound particularly whiz-bang. Best practices for teaching geometry can be found atCurriki or Edutopia or Wikiversity or Openplanner.

        The real shame is not allowing such a system to connect more than just the overworked NYC school system teachers. But what would we call such a thing? An inter-net, perhaps?

        Nah, that would never catch on.



        Lisa
        PS:

        DoE's Accountability Initiative Spending in Detail 2007-09 by the IBO


        ARIS called a 'disaster' in 2008:

        SCHOOLS COMPUTER AN $80M 'DISASTER'


        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        From: leonie@...
        Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2012 14:44:02 -0400
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] City's $80M Student Data System To Be Replaced by State Portal Updated

         

        Here it says Wireless Gen, run by Klein and owned by Murdoch’s NewsCorp, may still be chosen to create the state data system despite contract being vetoed by State Comptroller.

        City's $80M Student Data System To Be Replaced by State Portal Updated July 30, 2012 7:18am

        July 30, 2012 7:18am | By Jill Colvin, Amy Zimmer

        y)

        MANHATTAN — After spending more than $80 million on a controversial online student achievement database, the NYC Department of Education's portal is about to become obsolete as the state rolls out its own nearly-identical system as part of a federal education grant, DNAinfo.com New York has learned.
        The city is quietly making the transition from its $81 million data system — known as ARIS, or “Achievement Reporting and Innovation System" — to a new statewide database being developed with federal education funding, according to officials and city and state documents.
        ARIS, which was created and launched in 2008 to give parents, teachers and principals access to test scores, attendance and student histories, is set to be replaced in fall 2013 by the “State Longitudinal Data System” — expected to be an almost identical copy of the city's own web portal, officials said.

        Description: ARISThe city spent more than $80 million to develop ARIS for students, teachers, parents and principals. (sso.nycenet.edu/)

        The statewide system was created using a $19.7 million, three-year Race to the Top federal grant.
        "The goal is to transition to the state system once the state has the new system," Erin Hughes, a spokeswoman for the city Education Department confirmed to DNAinfo.
        News of the change came as a surprise even to the city's principals, many of whom have been reluctant to accept the existing system.
        "There have been no indications that there will be any changes in a year," said a spokeswoman for the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, the principal's union, who insisted the transition was "not happening."
        Watchdog groups also railed against the Education Department's investment in short-lived software.
        "Improving education through technology is vital, but spending nearly $100 million on an ineffective system is a huge waste of badly needed taxpayer dollars,” Comptroller John Liu's spokesman Matthew Sweeney said in a statement.
        A stinging report by Liu earlier this year found that ARIS had failed to improve student performance and that nearly half of instructors weren’t even bothering to use it. They were instead relying on other computer programs to track student progress, such as DataCation, which some say is easier to use.
        "ARIS is just the latest IT project that has failed to live up to the DOE’s hype," Sweeney added.
        Hughes said the new system "should provide much of the same functionality at a lower cost for the city" because the operating costs of the new system will be covered by the state instead of the DOE, but declined to provide specifics about how much might be saved.
        "The entire state is expected to participate, in part because of their [Race to the Top] commitments," said Tom Dunn, a spokesman for the New York State Education Department, who explained that the new system was in the process of being contracted out to developers and scheduled to be up and running by the fall of 2013.
        Dunn declined to comment further, citing a policy of not commenting during an ongoing procurement process.
        City officials said the state's federal application specifically cited ARIS as a template that it wanted to expand statewide.
        "The state’s system is modeled on ARIS, and we are working with them closely on its development," Hughes said.
        Some education advocates worried the state's move would only amplify a flawed system.
        "I think the fetish about test score data collection is not only misplaced but dangerous," said Leonie Haimson, executive director of Class Size Matters, who criticized the DOE for not providing accurate data on other things, such as class size and overcrowding.
        “They invest $80 million in this system. $80 million! Imagine what they could have done with the money,” said Zakiyah Ansari, advocacy director and at the Alliance for Quality Education, who said she has plugged into the ARIS system “maybe 5 or 10 times” over the years, despite having eight kids in the public school system.
        She urged planners to consult and work collaborate with stakeholders as new portal is being designed to avoid a repeat.
        Like its predecessor, the state's computer program has already encountered delays, according to a Race to the Top NY Report Year One 2010 - 2011, published by the U.S. Department of Education in January.
        ARIS was developed by IBM, but the contract was handed over at the beginning of the year to Wireless Generation, a subsidiary of News Corporation run by ex-Schools Chancellor Joel Klein.
        Wireless Generation had also originally been selected to build the new statewide system, but State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli rejected the $27 million contract last summer, citing concern about News Corp.'s phone-hacking scandal.
        The city's new $9.3 million contract with Wireless, which went into effect in January, is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2013, Liu's office said.
        Despite DiNapoli's decision last summer, Wireless could be chosen once again to help build the state's database and, and some believe that, if selected, they would be better able to merge the city's portal with the state's new program.
        But it remained unclear how much of the legwork the city already put into creating its system will be incorporated into the design of the new state system.
        "ARIS is seven years old now, and the way these things go, technology advances by leaps and bounds," said one education expert who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of having "sensitive privileged" information about the transition. "The DOE, as a general matter, had and has a bad habit of scaling experimental projects" and said the city made a mistake by investing so much money in what should have been a test run.
        There was a general consensus that ARIS was "an early start on computerized student data systems," the expert said, "so it wouldn't be a surprise that an initial investment of $80 million is now being adjusted based on the state and federal governments getting on the bandwagon."


        Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-data-system-be-replaced-by-state-portal#ixzz22E8pkFPV

         

         

        Leonie Haimson

        Executive Director

        Class Size Matters

        124 Waverly Pl.

        New York, NY 10011

        212-674-7320

        leonie@...

        www.classsizematters.org

        http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

         

        Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

         

        Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

         

        Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

         


      • Noah Gotbaum
        Article talks about how few teachers and principals are using the $80 million Aris system - despite the fact that the DOE is known to monitor and pressure
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 1, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Article talks about how few teachers and principals are using the $80 million Aris system - despite the fact that the DOE is known to monitor and pressure principals to do so.  Additionally, as Zakiyah points out, Aris has been a complete white elephant for parents.  Parent usage has been so anemic- rumored to be fewer than 1 in 50 parents using it with any regularity - that during Liu's audit of Aris the DOE withheld detailed data on the subject.  And this is the info system on which the State is now modeling its program!  

          Never underestimate the ability of the ed reform movement to waste money on policies and no-bid contracts which do absolutely nothing for our kids but do much to enrich their friends and - as in Klein's case - themselves.

          noah

          noah e gotbaum
          twitter: @noahegotbaum

          On Tue, Jul 31, 2012 at 2:44 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:
           

          Here it says Wireless Gen, run by Klein and owned by Murdoch’s NewsCorp, may still be chosen to create the state data system despite contract being vetoed by State Comptroller.

          City's $80M Student Data System To Be Replaced by State Portal Updated July 30, 2012 7:18am

          July 30, 2012 7:18am | By Jill Colvin, Amy Zimmer

          y)

          MANHATTAN — After spending more than $80 million on a controversial online student achievement database, the NYC Department of Education's portal is about to become obsolete as the state rolls out its own nearly-identical system as part of a federal education grant, DNAinfo.com New York has learned.

          The city is quietly making the transition from its $81 million data system — known as ARIS, or “Achievement Reporting and Innovation System" — to a new statewide database being developed with federal education funding, according to officials and city and state documents.

          ARIS, which was created and launched in 2008 to give parents, teachers and principals access to test scores, attendance and student histories, is set to be replaced in fall 2013 by the “State Longitudinal Data System” — expected to be an almost identical copy of the city's own web portal, officials said.

          Description: ARISThe city spent more than $80 million to develop ARIS for students, teachers, parents and principals. (sso.nycenet.edu/)

          The statewide system was created using a $19.7 million, three-year Race to the Top federal grant.

          "The goal is to transition to the state system once the state has the new system," Erin Hughes, a spokeswoman for the city Education Department confirmed to DNAinfo.

          News of the change came as a surprise even to the city's principals, many of whom have been reluctant to accept the existing system.

          "There have been no indications that there will be any changes in a year," said a spokeswoman for the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, the principal's union, who insisted the transition was "not happening."

          Watchdog groups also railed against the Education Department's investment in short-lived software.

          "Improving education through technology is vital, but spending nearly $100 million on an ineffective system is a huge waste of badly needed taxpayer dollars,” Comptroller John Liu's spokesman Matthew Sweeney said in a statement.

          A stinging report by Liu earlier this year found that ARIS had failed to improve student performance and that nearly half of instructors weren’t even bothering to use it. They were instead relying on other computer programs to track student progress, such as DataCation, which some say is easier to use.

          "ARIS is just the latest IT project that has failed to live up to the DOE’s hype," Sweeney added.

          Hughes said the new system "should provide much of the same functionality at a lower cost for the city" because the operating costs of the new system will be covered by the state instead of the DOE, but declined to provide specifics about how much might be saved.

          "The entire state is expected to participate, in part because of their [Race to the Top] commitments," said Tom Dunn, a spokesman for the New York State Education Department, who explained that the new system was in the process of being contracted out to developers and scheduled to be up and running by the fall of 2013.

          Dunn declined to comment further, citing a policy of not commenting during an ongoing procurement process.

          City officials said the state's federal application specifically cited ARIS as a template that it wanted to expand statewide.

          "The state’s system is modeled on ARIS, and we are working with them closely on its development," Hughes said.

          Some education advocates worried the state's move would only amplify a flawed system.

          "I think the fetish about test score data collection is not only misplaced but dangerous," said Leonie Haimson, executive director of Class Size Matters, who criticized the DOE for not providing accurate data on other things, such as class size and overcrowding.

          “They invest $80 million in this system. $80 million! Imagine what they could have done with the money,” said Zakiyah Ansari, advocacy director and at the Alliance for Quality Education, who said she has plugged into the ARIS system “maybe 5 or 10 times” over the years, despite having eight kids in the public school system.

          She urged planners to consult and work collaborate with stakeholders as new portal is being designed to avoid a repeat.

          Like its predecessor, the state's computer program has already encountered delays, according to a Race to the Top NY Report Year One 2010 - 2011, published by the U.S. Department of Education in January.

          ARIS was developed by IBM, but the contract was handed over at the beginning of the year to Wireless Generation, a subsidiary of News Corporation run by ex-Schools Chancellor Joel Klein.

          Wireless Generation had also originally been selected to build the new statewide system, but State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli rejected the $27 million contract last summer, citing concern about News Corp.'s phone-hacking scandal.

          The city's new $9.3 million contract with Wireless, which went into effect in January, is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2013, Liu's office said.

          Despite DiNapoli's decision last summer, Wireless could be chosen once again to help build the state's database and, and some believe that, if selected, they would be better able to merge the city's portal with the state's new program.

          But it remained unclear how much of the legwork the city already put into creating its system will be incorporated into the design of the new state system.

          "ARIS is seven years old now, and the way these things go, technology advances by leaps and bounds," said one education expert who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of having "sensitive privileged" information about the transition. "The DOE, as a general matter, had and has a bad habit of scaling experimental projects" and said the city made a mistake by investing so much money in what should have been a test run.

          There was a general consensus that ARIS was "an early start on computerized student data systems," the expert said, "so it wouldn't be a surprise that an initial investment of $80 million is now being adjusted based on the state and federal governments getting on the bandwagon."


          Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-data-system-be-replaced-by-state-portal#ixzz22E8pkFPV

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           




          --
          noah eliot gotbaum
          27 west 86th street, #7a
          new york, ny 10024

        • Ellen
          We have a new name for a new partnership: Kleindoch, kinda like Bloomklein
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 1, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            We have a new name for a new partnership: Kleindoch, kinda like Bloomklein

            --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, Noah Gotbaum <noah@...> wrote:
            >
            > Article talks about how few teachers and principals are using the $80
            > million Aris system - despite the fact that the DOE is known to monitor and
            > pressure principals to do so. Additionally, as Zakiyah points out, Aris
            > has been a complete white elephant for parents. Parent usage has been so
            > anemic- rumored to be fewer than 1 in 50 parents using it with any
            > regularity - that during Liu's audit of Aris the DOE withheld detailed data
            > on the subject. And this is the info system on which the State is now
            > modeling its program!
            >
            > Never underestimate the ability of the ed reform movement to waste money on
            > policies and no-bid contracts which do absolutely nothing for our kids but
            > do much to enrich their friends and - as in Klein's case - themselves.
            >
            > noah
            >
            > noah e gotbaum
            > twitter: @noahegotbaum
            >
            > On Tue, Jul 31, 2012 at 2:44 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > Here it says Wireless Gen, run by Klein and owned by Murdoch's NewsCorp,
            > > may still be chosen to create the state data system despite contract being
            > > vetoed by State Comptroller.**** City's $80M Student Data System To Be
            > > Replaced by State Portal Updated July 30, 2012 7:18am****
            > >
            > > July 30, 2012 7:18am | By Jill Colvin<http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/jill-colvin>,
            > > Amy Zimmer<http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/about-us/our-team/editorial-team/amy-zimmer>
            > > ****
            > >
            > > y) ****
            > >
            > > MANHATTAN — After spending more than $80 million on a controversial online
            > > student achievement database, the NYC Department of Education<http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/tags/department-of-education>'s
            > > portal is about to become obsolete as the state rolls out its own
            > > nearly-identical system as part of a federal education grant, DNAinfo.com
            > > New York has learned.****
            > >
            > > The city is quietly making the transition from its $81 million data system
            > > — known as ARIS, or "Achievement Reporting and Innovation System" — to a
            > > new statewide database being developed with federal education funding,
            > > according to officials and city and state documents.****
            > >
            > > ARIS, which was created and launched in 2008 to give parents, teachers and
            > > principals access to test scores, attendance and student histories, is set
            > > to be replaced in fall 2013 by the "State Longitudinal Data System" —
            > > expected to be an almost identical copy of the city's own web portal,
            > > officials said.****
            > >
            > > [image: Description: ARIS]The city spent more than $80 million to develop
            > > ARIS for students, teachers, parents and principals. (sso.nycenet.edu/) **
            > > **
            > >
            > > The statewide system was created using a $19.7 million, three-year Race to
            > > the Top federal grant.****
            > >
            > > "The goal is to transition to the state system once the state has the new
            > > system," Erin Hughes, a spokeswoman for the city Education Department
            > > confirmed to DNAinfo.****
            > >
            > > News of the change came as a surprise even to the city's principals, many
            > > of whom have been reluctant to accept the existing system.****
            > >
            > > "There have been no indications that there will be any changes in a year,"
            > > said a spokeswoman for the Council of School Supervisors and
            > > Administrators, the principal's union, who insisted the transition was "not
            > > happening."****
            > >
            > > Watchdog groups also railed against the Education Department's investment
            > > in short-lived software.****
            > >
            > > "Improving education through technology is vital, but spending nearly $100
            > > million on an ineffective system is a huge waste of badly needed taxpayer
            > > dollars," Comptroller John Liu<http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.shtm/>'s
            > > spokesman Matthew Sweeney said in a statement.****
            > >
            > > A stinging report by Liu<http://www.comptroller.nyc.gov/bureaus/audit/audits_2012/1-23-12_7I11-118A.shtm/>earlier this year found that ARIS had failed to improve student performance
            > > and that nearly half of instructors weren't even bothering to use it. They
            > > were instead relying on other computer programs to track student progress,
            > > such as DataCation <http://www.datacation.com/>, which some say is easier
            > > to use.****
            > >
            > > "ARIS is just the latest IT project that has failed to live up to the
            > > DOE's hype," Sweeney added.****
            > >
            > > Hughes said the new system "should provide much of the same functionality
            > > at a lower cost for the city" because the operating costs of the new system
            > > will be covered by the state instead of the DOE, but declined to provide
            > > specifics about how much might be saved.****
            > >
            > > "The entire state is expected to participate, in part because of their
            > > [Race to the Top] commitments," said Tom Dunn, a spokesman for the New York
            > > State Education Department, who explained that the new system was in the
            > > process of being contracted out to developers and scheduled to be up and
            > > running by the fall of 2013.****
            > >
            > > Dunn declined to comment further, citing a policy of not commenting during
            > > an ongoing procurement process.****
            > >
            > > City officials said the state's federal application specifically cited
            > > ARIS as a template that it wanted to expand statewide.****
            > >
            > > "The state's system is modeled on ARIS, and we are working with them
            > > closely on its development," Hughes said.****
            > >
            > > Some education advocates worried the state's move would only amplify a
            > > flawed system.****
            > >
            > > "I think the fetish about test score data collection is not only misplaced
            > > but dangerous," said Leonie Haimson, executive director of Class Size
            > > Matters <http://www.classsizematters.org/>, who criticized the DOE for
            > > not providing accurate data on other things, such as class size and
            > > overcrowding.****
            > >
            > > "They invest $80 million in this system. $80 million! Imagine what they
            > > could have done with the money," said Zakiyah Ansari, advocacy director and
            > > at the Alliance for Quality Education, who said she has plugged into the
            > > ARIS system "maybe 5 or 10 times" over the years, despite having eight kids
            > > in the public school system.****
            > >
            > > She urged planners to consult and work collaborate with stakeholders as
            > > new portal is being designed to avoid a repeat.****
            > >
            > > Like its predecessor, the state's computer program has already encountered
            > > delays, according to a Race to the Top NY Report Year One 2010 - 2011,
            > > published by the U.S. Department of Education in January.****
            > >
            > > ARIS was developed by IBM, but the contract was handed over at the
            > > beginning of the year to Wireless Generation, a subsidiary of News
            > > Corporation run by ex-Schools Chancellor Joel Klein.****
            > >
            > > Wireless Generation had also originally been selected to build the new
            > > statewide system, but State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli rejected the<http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-education-contract-murdoch-firm-article-1.948688>$27 million contract last summer,<http://www.nydailynews.com/news/chalk-hacks-new-york-scraps-27-million-education-contract-murdoch-firm-article-1.948688> citing
            > > concern about News Corp.'s phone-hacking scandal<http://www.scribd.com/doc/63532058/OSC-Letter-to-SED-8-25-11>
            > > .****
            > >
            > > The city's new $9.3 million contract with Wireless, which went into effect
            > > in January, is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2013, Liu's office said.****
            > >
            > > Despite DiNapoli's decision last summer, Wireless could be chosen once
            > > again to help build the state's database and, and some believe that, if
            > > selected, they would be better able to merge the city's portal with the
            > > state's new program.****
            > >
            > > But it remained unclear how much of the legwork the city already put into
            > > creating its system will be incorporated into the design of the new state
            > > system.****
            > >
            > > "ARIS is seven years old now, and the way these things go, technology
            > > advances by leaps and bounds," said one education expert who spoke on the
            > > condition of anonymity because of having "sensitive privileged" information
            > > about the transition. "The DOE, as a general matter, had and has a bad
            > > habit of scaling experimental projects" and said the city made a mistake by
            > > investing so much money in what should have been a test run.****
            > >
            > > There was a general consensus that ARIS was "an early start on
            > > computerized student data systems," the expert said, "so it wouldn't be a
            > > surprise that an initial investment of $80 million is now being adjusted
            > > based on the state and federal governments getting on the bandwagon."****
            > >
            > >
            > > Read more:
            > > http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120730/new-york-city/citys-80m-student-data-system-be-replaced-by-state-portal#ixzz22E8pkFPV
            > > ****
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > > Leonie Haimson****
            > >
            > > Executive Director****
            > >
            > > Class Size Matters****
            > >
            > > 124 Waverly Pl.****
            > >
            > > New York, NY 10011****
            > >
            > > 212-674-7320****
            > >
            > > leonie@... <classsizematters@...>****
            > >
            > > www.classsizematters.org****
            > >
            > > http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com****
            > >
            > > http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson****
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > > *Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson***
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > > *Make a tax-deductible contribution<http://www.nycharities.org/donate/c_donate.asp?CharityCode=1757>to Class Size Matters now!
            > > *
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > > *Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing *
            > > classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com****
            > >
            > > *Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing *
            > > nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com ****
            > >
            > > ** **
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > noah eliot gotbaum
            > 27 west 86th street, #7a
            > new york, ny 10024
            > noah@...
            > cell 917 658 3213
            >
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