Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

Expand Messages
  • Deborah Meier
    I love the way that researchers finally prove what we all know. Of course. That s the one thing wrong with the old DOE poicy. I got units from the Board
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2011
      I love the way that researchers finally "prove" what we all know.  Of course.  That's the one thing wrong with the old DOE poicy.  I got "units" from the Board of Ed as a high school.  One unit equaled one teacher--regrdless of their salary scale.  That fair one way, but unfair in another.

      Once again, one must make choices.

      The danger of the former policy is obvious.  The danger of the new is that it gives principals an incentive to hire cheaply and get rid of seniors.

      Deb
      -----
      Deborah Meier

      Note: latest book!! Playing For Keeps (TC Press) by D. Meier, Brenda Engel and Beth Taylor

      NOTE: new e-mail address.  deborahmeier@...

      For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com







      On Dec 1, 2011, at 1:37 PM, Leonie Haimson wrote:

       

       

      US Ed Dept released report, critical of the fact that high poverty schools have lower paid teachers; but doesn’t Arne Duncan support TFA & other cheap labor for these schls? 

       

      I know he gave them a $50 million grant to expand.

       

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/education/us-education-department-finds-salary-gap-in-poor-schools.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

       

      Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

      By SAM DILLON

      Published: November 30, 2011

       

      Education experts have long argued that a basic inequity in American schooling is that students in poor neighborhoods are frequently taught by low-paid rookie teachers who move on as they gain experience and rise up the salary scale.

      Until now, however, researchers lacked nationwide data to prove it. That changed Wednesday when the Department of Education released a 78-page report.

      Its conclusion: Tens of thousands of schools serving low-income students are being shortchanged because districts spend fewer state and local dollars on teacher salaries in those schools than on salaries in schools serving higher-income students.

      “Low-income students need extra support and resources to succeed, but in far too many places, policies for assigning teachers and allocating resources are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a conference call.

      The report, Comparability of State and Local Expenditures Among Schools Within Districts, is based on data collected from 84,000 public schools in districts that had to report salary expenditures to receive emergency federal money under the 2009 economic stimulus law, which channeled $100 billion to public education.

      The inequities documented in the report began to accumulate within a few years of the passage of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the main federal law on public schools, which channels money to educate poor children. To prevent them from simply substituting the federal antipoverty dollars for local funds, districts had to show that they were spending at least as much state and local education money in the poor schools getting federal money as they were spending in their more affluent schools.

      But a loophole allowed school systems to report educator salaries to Washington using a districtwide pay schedule, thus masking large salary gaps between the higher-paid veteran staffs in middle-class schools and the young teachers earning entry-level pay in poor parts of the district.

      A few researchers have documented the problem with statewide data in Florida and some other states, said Cynthia Brown, a vice president at the Center for American Progress, a liberal research group. “But I’m excited because this is the first time that data documenting the problem has ever been collected on a nationwide basis,” she said. “Many of us have known for a long time that in some individual districts the high-poverty schools weren’t getting their fair share of state and local funds.”

      Federal officials estimated that although the inequities were widespread, alleviating them would not be costly.

      “Providing low-income schools with comparable spending would cost as little as 1 percent of the average district’s total spending,” but the extra resources “would make a big impact by adding between 4 percent and 15 percent to the budget” of schools serving poor students, the department said in a statement.

      A version of this article appeared in print on December 1, 2011, on page A29 of the New York edition with the headline: Report: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools

       

       

      Leonie Haimson

      Executive Director

      Class Size Matters

      124 Waverly Pl.

      New York, NY 10011

      212-674-7320

      leonie@...

      www.classsizematters.org

      http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

       

      Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

       

      Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

       

      Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

      Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

       

      From: S. E. Anderson [mailto:seanderson@...]
      Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 8:43 AM
      To: MARK D. NAISON; sydralynn@...; sarahsolomon@...; simonebrown2003@...; juliereed15@...; kdi812@...; BDevale@...; irashor@...; schlosbon.jenna@...; itistime.nyc@...; romweb1@...; lauren.m.anderson@...; Keleju@...; davidgreene1949@...; gaxinthebronx@...; Omdrala@...; pequenalulu80@...; htaylor@...; bronxtom@...; mr.lamb@...; mkroby@...; castilloenglishteacher@...; JPRUITT@...; VICWISE@...; boogiedowner@...; janetm@...; classsizematters@...; normsco@...; martha_foote@...; BBDX@...; latsports@...; stan.karp@...; bryan.locascio@...; jose.sanchez@...; cwilder@...; dohugh@...; hburl1229@...; marianswer@...; rpc6@...; bncavaliere@...; purnell_amaez_family@...; Norm_Fruchter@...; samantha.cass@...; sam@...; wdesoto@...; annelooser@...; deven.black@...; jucelli@... g; bstein@...; hphillips@...; straussv@...; hoenigedu@...; erica.terrell@...; meelah82@...; frank.johnson@...; stephanie.janaye@...; hilary.lustick@...; ssdanesh@...; tviola453@...; wmekuria@...; camika.royal@...; ajisom@...; acherrera@...; asalynch@...; dagonz@...; mhayes1@...; kerrykretchmar@...; gvirchick@...; kas.psom@...; bwpurplewins@...; joseph.rogers.jr@...; h.s.quester@...; anu.okuyemi@...; judyperez1@...; kate_strom@...; bfteach@...; jasonpwatson@...; lvalencia@...; sosmarchmass@...; fjjazz@...; harlem120@...; jsiegel@...; samanthawinslow@...; nora.hyland@...; brendamoshea@...; janectyler@...; avram.barlowe@...; writepeg@...; oyler@...; ajbarlow@...; katiebelangerwilson@...; gavinl@...; chris@...; clevin1940@ aol.com; maya@...; monique@...
      Subject: Re: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

       

      Education Activists,

      I say the answer is #3. If you chose #4, then you are saying that TFA is an EFFECTIVE program that has a positive effect on "the racial achievement gap."

      This question is a typical example of a hi stakes question where you are confined to the test maker's perspective on the world and does not allow you to think, much less critically think!

      in Struggle,

      Sam Anderson


      qhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhhqhq

       

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: MARK D. NAISON

      Sent: 11/30/11 08:23 PM

      To: sydralynn@..., sarahsolomon@..., simonebrown2003@..., juliereed15@..., kdi812@..., BDevale@..., irashor@..., schlosbon.jenna@..., itistime.nyc@..., romweb1@..., lauren.m.anderson@..., Keleju@..., davidgreene1949@..., gaxinthebronx@..., Omdrala@..., pequenalulu80@..., htaylor@..., bronxtom@..., mr.lamb@..., mkroby@..., castilloenglishteacher@..., JPRUITT@..., VICWISE@..., boogiedowner@..., janetm@..., classsizematters@..., normsco@..., martha_foote@..., BBDX@..., latsports@..., stan.karp@..., bryan.locascio@..., jose.sanchez@..., cwilder@..., dohugh@..., hburl1229@..., marianswer@..., rpc6@..., bncavaliere@..., purnell_amaez_family@..., Norm_Fruchter@..., samantha.cass@..., sam@..., wdesoto@..., annelooser@..., deven.black@..., jucelli@..., bstein@..., hphillips@..., straussv@..., hoenigedu@..., erica.terrell@..., meelah82@..., frank.johnson@..., stephanie.janaye@..., hilary.lustick@..., ssdanesh@..., tviola453@..., wmekuria@..., camika.royal@..., ajisom@..., acherrera@..., asalynch@..., dagonz@..., mhayes1@..., kerrykretchmar@..., gvirchick@..., kas.psom@..., bwpurplewins@..., joseph.rogers.jr@..., seanderson@..., h.s.quester@..., anu.okuyemi@..., judyperez1@..., kate_strom@..., bfteach@..., jasonpwatson@..., lvalencia@..., sosmarchmass@..., fjjazz@..., harlem120@..., jsiegel@..., samanthawinslow@..., nora.hyland@..., brendamoshea@..., janectyler@..., avram.barlowe@..., writepeg@..., oyler@..., ajbarlow@..., katiebelangerwilson@..., gavinl@..., chris@..., clevin1940@..., maya@..., monique@...

      Subject: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

       

       


      Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

       


      Janet


      to:


      MARK D. NAISON

      11/30/2011 08:12 PM

       


      Please respond to "Janet"


      I choose- 4- none of the above!  TFA is detrimental to the public educational system it purports to improve. Since its participants(it is incorrect to call them teachers )do not know how to teach either reading or math,subjects which truly require years of experience and training to master) or any other subject for that matter, they hinder the progress of their students and hold them back from real learning which further increases the achievement gap and decreases students' self esteem! TFA's total effect is negative!
      Janet Mayer
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: MARK D. NAISON
      To: sydralynn@... ; sarahsolomon@... ; simonebrown2003@... ; juliereed15@... ; kdi812@... ; BDevale@... ; irashor@... ; schlosbon.jenna@... ; itistime.nyc@... ; romweb1@... ; lauren.m.anderson@... ; Keleju@... ; davidgreene1949@... ; gaxinthebronx@... ; Omdrala@... ; pequenalulu80@... ; htaylor@... ; bronxtom@... ; mr.lamb@... ; mkroby@... ; castilloenglishteacher@... ; JPRUITT@... ; VICWISE@... ; boogiedowner@... ; janetm@... ; classsizematters@... ; normsco@... ; martha_foote@... ; BBDX@... ; latsports@... ; stan.karp@... ; bryan.locascio@... ; jose.sanchez@... ; cwilder@... ; dohugh@... ; hburl1229@... ; marianswer@... ; rpc6@... ; bncavaliere@... ; purnell_amaez_family@... ; Norm_Fruchter@... ; samantha.cass@... ; sam@... ; wdesoto@... ; annelooser@... ; deven.black@... ; jucelli@... ; bstein@... ; hphillips@... ; straussv@... ; hoenigedu@... ; erica.terrell@... ; meelah82@... ; frank.johnson@... ; stephanie.janaye@... ; hilary.lustick@... ; ssdanesh@... ; tviola453@... ; wmekuria@... ; camika.royal@... ; ajisom@... ; acherrera@... ; asalynch@... ; dagonz@... ; mhayes1@... ; kerrykretchmar@... ; gvirchick@... ; kas.psom@... ; bwpurplewins@... ; joseph.rogers.jr@... ; seanderson@... ; h.s.quester@... ; anu.okuyemi@... ; judyperez1@... ; kate_strom@... ; bfteach@... ; jasonpwatson@... ; lvalencia@... ; sosmarchmass@... ; fjjazz@... ; harlem120@... ; jsiegel@... ; samanthawinslow@... ; nora.hyland@... ; brendamoshea@... ; janectyler@... ; avram.barlowe@... ; writepeg@... ; oyler@... ; ajbarlow@... ; katiebelangerwilson@... ; gavinl@... ; chris@... ; clevin1940@... ; maya@... ; monique@...
      Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:53 PM
      Subject: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators


      [IMAGE]

      [IMAGE]

      A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

       

      [IMAGE]
      MARK D. NAISON

      [IMAGE]
      to:

      [IMAGE]
      naison

      [IMAGE]

      11/30/2011 06:52 PM

      Choose one of the following

      Is Teach for America

      1 A force for racial and economic equality?
      ...
      2 A finishing school for the 1 Percent?

      3. A highly publicized but ineffective program that lhas no effect whatsoever on "the racial achievement gap."

      4. None of the above










      Mark D Naison
      Professor of African American Studies and History
      Principal Investigator
      Bronx African American History Project
      640 Dealy Hall
      Fordham University
      Bronx, NY 10458
      Phone (718) 817-3748 Fax (718) 817-3385=

       




      ----------------------------------
      s. e. anderson
      author of The Black Holocaust for Beginners
      www.blackeducator.org
      www.blackeducator.blogspot.com
      If WORK was good for you, the rich would leave none for the poor. (Haiti) 
      --------------------------------------------



    • Lisa Donlan
      Looking forward to this follow up report: In addition to the primary data collection described above, the study also collected more detailed school-level and
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2011

        Looking forward to this follow up report:


        In addition to the primary data collection described above, the study also collected more detailed 
        school-level and personnel-level data from five states: Colorado, Florida, New York, Ohio, and 
        Texas. The purpose of this additional data collection was to: (1) validate the aggregate data 
        collected in the primary data collection by comparing them to the more detailed data collected 
        from the five states; and (2) carry out more in-depth analyses of possible variations in resource 
        levels across schools. The specific data collected varied across the five states depending on the 
        data that was available in existing data systems in each state. The more detailed five-state data 
        will be analyzed in a later report from this study


        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com; PAAnews@yahoogroups.com
        From: leonie@...
        Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 13:37:09 -0500
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

         

         

        US Ed Dept released report, critical of the fact that high poverty schools have lower paid teachers; but doesn’t Arne Duncan support TFA & other cheap labor for these schls? 

         

        I know he gave them a $50 million grant to expand.

         

        http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/education/us-education-department-finds-salary-gap-in-poor-schools.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

         

        Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

        By SAM DILLON

        Published: November 30, 2011

         

        Education experts have long argued that a basic inequity in American schooling is that students in poor neighborhoods are frequently taught by low-paid rookie teachers who move on as they gain experience and rise up the salary scale.

        Until now, however, researchers lacked nationwide data to prove it. That changed Wednesday when the Department of Education released a 78-page report.

        Its conclusion: Tens of thousands of schools serving low-income students are being shortchanged because districts spend fewer state and local dollars on teacher salaries in those schools than on salaries in schools serving higher-income students.

        “Low-income students need extra support and resources to succeed, but in far too many places, policies for assigning teachers and allocating resources are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a conference call.

        The report, Comparability of State and Local Expenditures Among Schools Within Districts, is based on data collected from 84,000 public schools in districts that had to report salary expenditures to receive emergency federal money under the 2009 economic stimulus law, which channeled $100 billion to public education.

        The inequities documented in the report began to accumulate within a few years of the passage of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the main federal law on public schools, which channels money to educate poor children. To prevent them from simply substituting the federal antipoverty dollars for local funds, districts had to show that they were spending at least as much state and local education money in the poor schools getting federal money as they were spending in their more affluent schools.

        But a loophole allowed school systems to report educator salaries to Washington using a districtwide pay schedule, thus masking large salary gaps between the higher-paid veteran staffs in middle-class schools and the young teachers earning entry-level pay in poor parts of the district.

        A few researchers have documented the problem with statewide data in Florida and some other states, said Cynthia Brown, a vice president at the Center for American Progress, a liberal research group. “But I’m excited because this is the first time that data documenting the problem has ever been collected on a nationwide basis,” she said. “Many of us have known for a long time that in some individual districts the high-poverty schools weren’t getting their fair share of state and local funds.”

        Federal officials estimated that although the inequities were widespread, alleviating them would not be costly.

        “Providing low-income schools with comparable spending would cost as little as 1 percent of the average district’s total spending,” but the extra resources “would make a big impact by adding between 4 percent and 15 percent to the budget” of schools serving poor students, the department said in a statement.

        A version of this article appeared in print on December 1, 2011, on page A29 of the New York edition with the headline: Report: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools

         

         

        Leonie Haimson

        Executive Director

        Class Size Matters

        124 Waverly Pl.

        New York, NY 10011

        212-674-7320

        leonie@...

        www.classsizematters.org

        http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

         

        Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

         

        Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

         

        Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

         

        From: S. E. Anderson [mailto:seanderson@...]
        Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 8:43 AM
        To: MARK D. NAISON; sydralynn@...; sarahsolomon@...; simonebrown2003@...; juliereed15@...; kdi812@...; BDevale@...; irashor@...; schlosbon.jenna@...; itistime.nyc@...; romweb1@...; lauren.m.anderson@...; Keleju@...; davidgreene1949@...; gaxinthebronx@...; Omdrala@...; pequenalulu80@...; htaylor@...; bronxtom@...; mr.lamb@...; mkroby@...; castilloenglishteacher@...; JPRUITT@...; VICWISE@...; boogiedowner@...; janetm@...; classsizematters@...; normsco@...; martha_foote@...; BBDX@...; latsports@...; stan.karp@...; bryan.locascio@...; jose.sanchez@...; cwilder@...; dohugh@...; hburl1229@...; marianswer@...; rpc6@...; bncavaliere@...; purnell_amaez_family@...; Norm_Fruchter@...; samantha.cass@...; sam@...; wdesoto@...; annelooser@...; deven.black@...; jucelli@... g; bstein@...; hphillips@...; straussv@...; hoenigedu@...; erica.terrell@...; meelah82@...; frank.johnson@...; stephanie.janaye@...; hilary.lustick@...; ssdanesh@...; tviola453@...; wmekuria@...; camika.royal@...; ajisom@...; acherrera@...; asalynch@...; dagonz@...; mhayes1@...; kerrykretchmar@...; gvirchick@...; kas.psom@...; bwpurplewins@...; joseph.rogers.jr@...; h.s.quester@...; anu.okuyemi@...; judyperez1@...; kate_strom@...; bfteach@...; jasonpwatson@...; lvalencia@...; sosmarchmass@...; fjjazz@...; harlem120@...; jsiegel@...; samanthawinslow@...; nora.hyland@...; brendamoshea@...; janectyler@...; avram.barlowe@...; writepeg@...; oyler@...; ajbarlow@...; katiebelangerwilson@...; gavinl@...; chris@...; clevin1940@ aol.com; maya@...; monique@...
        Subject: Re: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

         

        Education Activists,

        I say the answer is #3. If you chose #4, then you are saying that TFA is an EFFECTIVE program that has a positive effect on "the racial achievement gap."

        This question is a typical example of a hi stakes question where you are confined to the test maker's perspective on the world and does not allow you to think, much less critically think!

        in Struggle,

        Sam Anderson


        qhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhhqhq

         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: MARK D. NAISON
        Sent: 11/30/11 08:23 PM
        To: sydralynn@..., sarahsolomon@..., simonebrown2003@..., juliereed15@..., kdi812@..., BDevale@..., irashor@..., schlosbon.jenna@..., itistime.nyc@..., romweb1@..., lauren.m.anderson@..., Keleju@..., davidgreene1949@..., gaxinthebronx@..., Omdrala@..., pequenalulu80@..., htaylor@..., bronxtom@..., mr.lamb@..., mkroby@..., castilloenglishteacher@..., JPRUITT@..., VICWISE@..., boogiedowner@..., janetm@..., classsizematters@..., normsco@..., martha_foote@..., BBDX@..., latsports@..., stan.karp@..., bryan.locascio@..., jose.sanchez@..., cwilder@..., dohugh@..., hburl1229@..., marianswer@..., rpc6@..., bncavaliere@..., purnell_amaez_family@..., Norm_Fruchter@..., samantha.cass@..., sam@..., wdesoto@..., annelooser@..., deven.black@..., jucelli@..., bstein@..., hphillips@..., straussv@..., hoenigedu@..., erica.terrell@..., meelah82@..., frank.johnson@..., stephanie.janaye@..., hilary.lustick@..., ssdanesh@..., tviola453@..., wmekuria@..., camika.royal@..., ajisom@..., acherrera@..., asalynch@..., dagonz@..., mhayes1@..., kerrykretchmar@..., gvirchick@..., kas.psom@..., bwpurplewins@..., joseph.rogers.jr@..., seanderson@..., h.s.quester@..., anu.okuyemi@..., judyperez1@..., kate_strom@..., bfteach@..., jasonpwatson@..., lvalencia@..., sosmarchmass@..., fjjazz@..., harlem120@..., jsiegel@..., samanthawinslow@..., nora.hyland@..., brendamoshea@..., janectyler@..., avram.barlowe@..., writepeg@..., oyler@..., ajbarlow@..., katiebelangerwilson@..., gavinl@..., chris@..., clevin1940@..., maya@..., monique@...
        Subject: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

         

         


        Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

         


        Janet


        to:


        MARK D. NAISON

        11/30/2011 08:12 PM

         


        Please respond to "Janet"


        I choose- 4- none of the above!  TFA is detrimental to the public educational system it purports to improve. Since its participants(it is incorrect to call them teachers )do not know how to teach either reading or math,subjects which truly require years of experience and training to master) or any other subject for that matter, they hinder the progress of their students and hold them back from real learning which further increases the achievement gap and decreases students' self esteem! TFA's total effect is negative!
        Janet Mayer
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: MARK D. NAISON
        To: sydralynn@... ; sarahsolomon@... ; simonebrown2003@... ; juliereed15@... ; kdi812@... ; BDevale@... ; irashor@... ; schlosbon.jenna@... ; itistime.nyc@... ; romweb1@... ; lauren.m.anderson@... ; Keleju@... ; davidgreene1949@... ; gaxinthebronx@... ; Omdrala@... ; pequenalulu80@... ; htaylor@... ; bronxtom@... ; mr.lamb@... ; mkroby@... ; castilloenglishteacher@... ; JPRUITT@... ; VICWISE@... ; boogiedowner@... ; janetm@... ; classsizematters@... ; normsco@... ; martha_foote@... ; BBDX@... ; latsports@... ; stan.karp@... ; bryan.locascio@... ; jose.sanchez@... ; cwilder@... ; dohugh@... ; hburl1229@... ; marianswer@... ; rpc6@... ; bncavaliere@... ; purnell_amaez_family@... ; Norm_Fruchter@... ; samantha.cass@... ; sam@... ; wdesoto@... ; annelooser@... ; deven.black@... ; jucelli@... ; bstein@... ; hphillips@... ; straussv@... ; hoenigedu@... ; erica.terrell@... ; meelah82@... ; frank.johnson@... ; stephanie.janaye@... ; hilary.lustick@... ; ssdanesh@... ; tviola453@... ; wmekuria@... ; camika.royal@... ; ajisom@... ; acherrera@... ; asalynch@... ; dagonz@... ; mhayes1@... ; kerrykretchmar@... ; gvirchick@... ; kas.psom@... ; bwpurplewins@... ; joseph.rogers.jr@... ; seanderson@... ; h.s.quester@... ; anu.okuyemi@... ; judyperez1@... ; kate_strom@... ; bfteach@... ; jasonpwatson@... ; lvalencia@... ; sosmarchmass@... ; fjjazz@... ; harlem120@... ; jsiegel@... ; samanthawinslow@... ; nora.hyland@... ; brendamoshea@... ; janectyler@... ; avram.barlowe@... ; writepeg@... ; oyler@... ; ajbarlow@... ; katiebelangerwilson@... ; gavinl@... ; chris@... ; clevin1940@... ; maya@... ; monique@...
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:53 PM
        Subject: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators


        [IMAGE]

        [IMAGE]

        A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

         

        [IMAGE]
        MARK D. NAISON

        [IMAGE]
        to:

        [IMAGE]
        naison

        [IMAGE]

        11/30/2011 06:52 PM

        Choose one of the following

        Is Teach for America

        1 A force for racial and economic equality?
        ...
        2 A finishing school for the 1 Percent?

        3. A highly publicized but ineffective program that lhas no effect whatsoever on "the racial achievement gap."

        4. None of the above










        Mark D Naison
        Professor of African American Studies and History
        Principal Investigator
        Bronx African American History Project
        640 Dealy Hall
        Fordham University
        Bronx, NY 10458
        Phone (718) 817-3748 Fax (718) 817-3385=

         




        ----------------------------------
        s. e. anderson
        author of The Black Holocaust for Beginners
        www.blackeducator.org
        www.blackeducator.blogspot.com
        If WORK was good for you, the rich would leave none for the poor. (Haiti) 
        --------------------------------------------


      • Leonie Haimson
        Check out Bruce Baker s response below. The intra-district disparities, which may relate to diff. percentages of ELL or special needs kids, and which the corp
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2011

          Check out Bruce Baker’s response below.  The intra-district disparities, which may relate to diff. percentages of ELL or special needs kids, and which the corp reformers like Roza of Gates & CAP like to focus on, are far less than those between districts, as he points out.

           

          http://schoolfinance101.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/the-comparability-distraction-the-real-funding-equity-issue/#comment-1623

          The Comparability Distraction & the Real Funding Equity Issue

          Posted on December 1, 2011

          Yesterday, the US Department of Education released a new report addressing how districts qualified for Title I funds (higher poverty districts) often allocate resources across their schools inequitably, arguing that requirements for receiving Title I funds should be strengthened.

          The report is here: http://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/title-i/school-level-expenditures/school-level-expenditures.pdf

          Related resources here: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/ppss/reports.html#comparability-state-local-expenditures

          It is certainly problematic that many public school districts have far from predictable, far from logical and far from equitable formulas for distributing resources across their schools. This is a problem which should be addressed. And improving comparability provisions for receipt of Title I funding is an appropriate step to take in this regard.

          However, it is critically important to understand that improving within district comparability of resources across schools is only a very small piece of a much larger equity puzzle. It’s a drop in the bucket. Perhaps an important drop, but not one that will even come close to resolving the major equity issues that plague public education systems today.

          I have written on this topic previously both on this blog and in peer reviewed publications:

          • Baker, B. D., & Welner, K. G. (2010). “Premature celebrations: The persistence of interdistrict funding disparities” Educational Policy Analysis Archives, 18(9). Retrieved [date] from http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/718
          • B. D. (2009). Within-district resource allocation and the marginal costs of
            providing equal educational opportunity: Evidence from Texas and Ohio. Education Policy
            Analysis Archives, 17(3). Retrieved [date] from http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v17n3/.
          • Baker, B.D. Re-arranging deck chairs in Dallas: Contextual constraints on within district resource allocation in large urban Texas school districts. DeckChairsinDallas.Baker (forthcoming in Journal of Education Finance)

          Among other things, I have pointed out on this blog that one reason why focusing on within district disparities between “rich and poor” schools is misguided is because most of the disparities in wealth among families and children occur across district lines rather than within district boundaries. (2nd major point in post)

          The new U.S. Dept. of Ed. report reinforces this overemphasis on within district disparity, ignoring entirely between district disparity. In part, it is perhaps a more politically convenient argument to point blame at local school district officials, rather than states, for not doing their part to improve equity across schools. Local school officials make good targets, but it’s harder to pick on states & state legislatures.

          Here’s one way in which the USDOE report casts the disparities:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide1.jpg?w=594&h=445The report compares the number of Title I (higher poverty) schools that have lower per pupil spending than non-Title I schools in the same district.  This becomes fodder for the news headlines. And I would argue, fuels public distraction from the bigger inequities.

          Now, there are a multitude of methodological quibbles I have with this analysis. First, it compares only the average spending of Title I and non-Title I schools within districts, without consideration for other factors which frequently serve as strong predictors of different school site spending across schools within districts (primarily, concentrations of children with disabilities, and district choices to locate specific programs in specific schools). Poverty is one factor – and a very important one at that – but it’s also important to look across the full range of poverty concentration across schools in a district, rather than just splitting schools into Title I and non-Title I. The Deck Chairs in Dallas article above provides examples of the steps one should take to evaluate equity in spending across schools within districts. So too does this article: http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/5

          But, let’s take a look at the more important issue that is missed entirely in the myopic focus on within district disparities and “blame the local districts” approach to school funding equity.

          First stop, Philadelphia. This first graph shows the box plot of elementary school spending per pupil from the data set used in the USDOE report (nice new data to play with!)http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide3.jpg?w=594&h=445 Philadelphia city elementary schools simply have far less than elementary schools in surrounding districts (in Pennsylvania). THIS IS THE MAJOR EQUITY CONCERN!  Here’s how these funding differences play out along a continuum of all schools in the metro (within PA) with respect to students qualified for free or reduced price lunch:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide2.jpg?w=594&h=445Philadelphia schools are in Red. Indeed, the pattern of spending per pupil with respect to % free or reduced price lunch is not what I would want/expect to see across schools within Philadelphia. It actually appears somewhat regressive. That is, higher poverty schools within Philadelphia having marginally lower spending per pupil than lower poverty ones. But, there may be some other factors at play (such as special education population distributions) which complicate the interpretation of this relationship. But, we also see that:

          1. the majority of Philadelphia elementary schools have near or over 80% free or reduced price lunch
          2. the majority of schools in this picture that are over 80% free or reduced price lunch are Philadelphia schools
          3. Philadelphia schools have systematically fewer per pupil resources than those of surrounding districts
          4. the majority of other schools in the metro area have fewer than 40% free or reduced price lunch
          5. these much lower poverty schools IN OTHER DISTRICTS have higher average spending.

          These are the districts with which Philadelphia must compete to recruit and retain a sufficient quantity of high quality teachers. And it’s clearly a losing battle.

          Focusing only on the disparities inside Philadelphia, bringing the comparability hammer down on Philadelphia does little to resolve the bigger funding equity issues that are a function of neglect by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, not the city of Philadelphia.

          Not all metro areas look this bad. In many cases, central cities are on average or slightly above average for their metro areas. But arguably, not “enough” above average that they have wide latitude to reshuffle their resources aggressively to their higher poverty schools. Note that if Philadelphia did strive to create a strong progressive distribution of resources toward higher poverty schools, all other schools in the district would be left with next to nothing – at least relative to their surroundings. This is the very “deck chairs” issue I discuss in my paper on Dallas (well, actually on Texas as a whole).

          It also turns out that many smaller cities, and very poor inner urban fringe areas (with particularly weak tax base) are often as disadvantaged or much more disadvantaged than the urban core. Places we don’t always hear about. Here’s one of my favorite small city examples, Utica, NY:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/utica.jpg?w=594&h=445

          Utica City elementary schools (1 in Box Plot) have much lower average per pupil spending than elementary schools in surrounding districts.Here’s the scatterplot with respect to % free or reduced price lunch:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide6.jpg?w=594&h=445Like Philadelphia, there appear to be inequities in resources across Utica City elementary schools. But again, most Utica City elementary schools have over 80% free or reduced price lunch and spend less per pupil than most elementary schools in surrounding districts, many of which are not wealthy districts by any stretch of the imagination. They’re just not as poor as Utica itself. Here’s a little more backdrop on the position of Utica among NY State school districts.

          While it is important, and relevant to consider ways to tighten regulations on Title I districts to require that they are allocating resources equitably across schools within their boundaries, we cannot and should not let the emphasis on Title I and Comparability distract us from the bigger equity issues – the harder equity issues to resolve.  While it’s politically convenient to blame local bureaucrats (those overpaid fat cats in large city school district central offices) we must also maintain pressure on states to do the right thing, and ensure that these districts have the resources they need in order to distribute them equitably.

          see also: http://www.schoolfundingfairness.org/

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lisa Donlan
          Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 11:31 PM
          To: nyced newsgroup
          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

           

           

           

          Looking forward to this follow up report:

           

           

          In addition to the primary data collection described above, the study also collected more detailed 

          school-level and personnel-level data from five states: Colorado, Florida, New York, Ohio, and 

          Texas. The purpose of this additional data collection was to: (1) validate the aggregate data 

          collected in the primary data collection by comparing them to the more detailed data collected 

          from the five states; and (2) carry out more in-depth analyses of possible variations in resource 

          levels across schools. The specific data collected varied across the five states depending on the 

          data that was available in existing data systems in each state. The more detailed five-state data 

          will be analyzed in a later report from this study

           


          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com; PAAnews@yahoogroups.com
          From: leonie@...
          Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 13:37:09 -0500
          Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

           

           

           

          US Ed Dept released report, critical of the fact that high poverty schools have lower paid teachers; but doesn’t Arne Duncan support TFA & other cheap labor for these schls? 

           

          I know he gave them a i0 million grant to expand.

           

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/education/us-education-department-finds-salary-gap-in-poor-schools.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

           

          Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

          By SAM DILLON

          Published: November 30, 2011

           

          Education experts have long argued that a basic inequity in American schooling is that students in poor neighborhoods are frequently taught by low-paid rookie teachers who move on as they gain experience and rise up the salary scale.

          Until now, however, researchers lacked nationwide data to prove it. That changed Wednesday when the Department of Education released a 78-page report.

          Its conclusion: Tens of thousands of schools serving low-income students are being shortchanged because districts spend fewer state and local dollars on teacher salaries in those schools than on salaries in schools serving higher-income students.

          “Low-income students need extra support and resources to succeed, but in far too many places, policies for assigning teachers and allocating resources are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a conference call.

          The report, Comparability of State and Local Expenditures Among Schools Within Districts, is based on data collected from 84,000 public schools in districts that had to report salary expenditures to receive emergency federal money under the 2009 economic stimulus law, which channeled http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide1.jpg?w=594&h=445The report compares the number of Title I (higher poverty) schools that have lower per pupil spending than non-Title I schools in the same district.  This becomes fodder for the news headlines. And I would argue, fuels public distraction from the bigger inequities.

          Now, there are a multitude of methodological quibbles I have with this analysis. First, it compares only the average spending of Title I and non-Title I schools within districts, without consideration for other factors which frequently serve as strong predictors of different school site spending across schools within districts (primarily, concentrations of children with disabilities, and district choices to locate specific programs in specific schools). Poverty is one factor – and a very important one at that – but it’s also important to look across the full range of poverty concentration across schools in a district, rather than just splitting schools into Title I and non-Title I. The Deck Chairs in Dallas article above provides examples of the steps one should take to evaluate equity in spending across schools within districts. So too does this article: http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/5

          But, let’s take a look at the more important issue that is missed entirely in the myopic focus on within district disparities and “blame the local districts” approach to school funding equity.

          First stop, Philadelphia. This first graph shows the box plot of elementary school spending per pupil from the data set used in the USDOE report (nice new data to play with!)http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide3.jpg?w=594&h=445 Philadelphia city elementary schools simply have far less than elementary schools in surrounding districts (in Pennsylvania). THIS IS THE MAJOR EQUITY CONCERN!  Here’s how these funding differences play out along a continuum of all schools in the metro (within PA) with respect to students qualified for free or reduced price lunch:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide2.jpg?w=594&h=445Philadelphia schools are in Red. Indeed, the pattern of spending per pupil with respect to % free or reduced price lunch is not what I would want/expect to see across schools within Philadelphia. It actually appears somewhat regressive. That is, higher poverty schools within Philadelphia having marginally lower spending per pupil than lower poverty ones. But, there may be some other factors at play (such as special education population distributions) which complicate the interpretation of this relationship. But, we also see that:

          1. the majority of Philadelphia elementary schools have near or over 80% free or reduced price lunch
          2. the majority of schools in this picture that are over 80% free or reduced price lunch are Philadelphia schools
          3. Philadelphia schools have systematically fewer per pupil resources than those of surrounding districts
          4. the majority of other schools in the metro area have fewer than 40% free or reduced price lunch
          5. these much lower poverty schools IN OTHER DISTRICTS have higher average spending.

          These are the districts with which Philadelphia must compete to recruit and retain a sufficient quantity of high quality teachers. And it’s clearly a losing battle.

          Focusing only on the disparities inside Philadelphia, bringing the comparability hammer down on Philadelphia does little to resolve the bigger funding equity issues that are a function of neglect by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, not the city of Philadelphia.

          Not all metro areas look this bad. In many cases, central cities are on average or slightly above average for their metro areas. But arguably, not “enough” above average that they have wide latitude to reshuffle their resources aggressively to their higher poverty schools. Note that if Philadelphia did strive to create a strong progressive distribution of resources toward higher poverty schools, all other schools in the district would be left with next to nothing – at least relative to their surroundings. This is the very “deck chairs” issue I discuss in my paper on Dallas (well, actually on Texas as a whole).

          It also turns out that many smaller cities, and very poor inner urban fringe areas (with particularly weak tax base) are often as disadvantaged or much more disadvantaged than the urban core. Places we don’t always hear about. Here’s one of my favorite small city examples, Utica, NY:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/utica.jpg?w=594&h=445

          Utica City elementary schools (1 in Box Plot) have much lower average per pupil spending than elementary schools in surrounding districts.Here’s the scatterplot with respect to % free or reduced price lunch:

          http://schoolfinance101.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/slide6.jpg?w=594&h=445Like Philadelphia, there appear to be inequities in resources across Utica City elementary schools. But again, most Utica City elementary schools have over 80% free or reduced price lunch and spend less per pupil than most elementary schools in surrounding districts, many of which are not wealthy districts by any stretch of the imagination. They’re just not as poor as Utica itself. Here’s a little more backdrop on the position of Utica among NY State school districts.

          While it is important, and relevant to consider ways to tighten regulations on Title I districts to require that they are allocating resources equitably across schools within their boundaries, we cannot and should not let the emphasis on Title I and Comparability distract us from the bigger equity issues – the harder equity issues to resolve.  While it’s politically convenient to blame local bureaucrats (those overpaid fat cats in large city school district central offices) we must also maintain pressure on states to do the right thing, and ensure that these districts have the resources they need in order to distribute them equitably.

          see also: http://www.schoolfundingfairness.org/

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lisa Donlan
          Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 11:31 PM
          To: nyced newsgroup
          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

           

           

           

          Looking forward to this follow up report:

           

           

          In addition to the primary data collection described above, the study also collected more detailed 

          school-level and personnel-level data from five states: Colorado, Florida, New York, Ohio, and 

          Texas. The purpose of this additional data collection was to: (1) validate the aggregate data 

          collected in the primary data collection by comparing them to the more detailed data collected 

          from the five states; and (2) carry out more in-depth analyses of possible variations in resource 

          levels across schools. The specific data collected varied across the five states depending on the 

          data that was available in existing data systems in each state. The more detailed five-state data 

          will be analyzed in a later report from this study

           


          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com; PAAnews@yahoogroups.com
          From: leonie@...
          Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 13:37:09 -0500
          Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

           

           

           

          US Ed Dept released report, critical of the fact that high poverty schools have lower paid teachers; but doesn’t Arne Duncan support TFA & other cheap labor for these schls? 

           

          I know he gave them a $50 million grant to expand.

           

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/education/us-education-department-finds-salary-gap-in-poor-schools.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

           

          Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says

          By SAM DILLON

          Published: November 30, 2011

           

          Education experts have long argued that a basic inequity in American schooling is that students in poor neighborhoods are frequently taught by low-paid rookie teachers who move on as they gain experience and rise up the salary scale.

          Until now, however, researchers lacked nationwide data to prove it. That changed Wednesday when the Department of Education released a 78-page report.

          Its conclusion: Tens of thousands of schools serving low-income students are being shortchanged because districts spend fewer state and local dollars on teacher salaries in those schools than on salaries in schools serving higher-income students.

          “Low-income students need extra support and resources to succeed, but in far too many places, policies for assigning teachers and allocating resources are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a conference call.

          The report, Comparability of State and Local Expenditures Among Schools Within Districts, is based on data collected from 84,000 public schools in districts that had to report salary expenditures to receive emergency federal money under the 2009 economic stimulus law, which channeled $100 billion to public education.

          The inequities documented in the report began to accumulate within a few years of the passage of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the main federal law on public schools, which channels money to educate poor children. To prevent them from simply substituting the federal antipoverty dollars for local funds, districts had to show that they were spending at least as much state and local education money in the poor schools getting federal money as they were spending in their more affluent schools.

          But a loophole allowed school systems to report educator salaries to Washington using a districtwide pay schedule, thus masking large salary gaps between the higher-paid veteran staffs in middle-class schools and the young teachers earning entry-level pay in poor parts of the district.

          A few researchers have documented the problem with statewide data in Florida and some other states, said Cynthia Brown, a vice president at the Center for American Progress, a liberal research group. “But I’m excited because this is the first time that data documenting the problem has ever been collected on a nationwide basis,” she said. “Many of us have known for a long time that in some individual districts the high-poverty schools weren’t getting their fair share of state and local funds.”

          Federal officials estimated that although the inequities were widespread, alleviating them would not be costly.

          “Providing low-income schools with comparable spending would cost as little as 1 percent of the average district’s total spending,” but the extra resources “would make a big impact by adding between 4 percent and 15 percent to the budget” of schools serving poor students, the department said in a statement.

          A version of this article appeared in print on December 1, 2011, on page A29 of the New York edition with the headline: Report: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: S. E. Anderson [mailto:seanderson@...]
          Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 8:43 AM
          To: MARK D. NAISON; sydralynn@...; sarahsolomon@...; simonebrown2003@...; juliereed15@...; kdi812@...; BDevale@...; irashor@...; schlosbon.jenna@...; itistime.nyc@...; romweb1@...; lauren.m.anderson@...; Keleju@...; davidgreene1949@...; gaxinthebronx@...; Omdrala@...; pequenalulu80@...; htaylor@...; bronxtom@...; mr.lamb@...; mkroby@...; castilloenglishteacher@...; JPRUITT@...; VICWISE@...; boogiedowner@...; janetm@...; classsizematters@...; normsco@...; martha_foote@...; BBDX@...; latsports@...; stan.karp@...; bryan.locascio@...; jose.sanchez@...; cwilder@...; dohugh@...; hburl1229@...; marianswer@...; rpc6@...; bncavaliere@...; purnell_amaez_family@...; Norm_Fruchter@...; samantha.cass@...; sam@...; wdesoto@...; annelooser@...; deven.black@...; jucelli@... g; bstein@...; hphillips@...; straussv@...; hoenigedu@...; erica.terrell@...; meelah82@...; frank.johnson@...; stephanie.janaye@...; hilary.lustick@...; ssdanesh@...; tviola453@...; wmekuria@...; camika.royal@...; ajisom@...; acherrera@...; asalynch@...; dagonz@...; mhayes1@...; kerrykretchmar@...; gvirchick@...; kas.psom@...; bwpurplewins@...; joseph.rogers.jr@...; h.s.quester@...; anu.okuyemi@...; judyperez1@...; kate_strom@...; bfteach@...; jasonpwatson@...; lvalencia@...; sosmarchmass@...; fjjazz@...; harlem120@...; jsiegel@...; samanthawinslow@...; nora.hyland@...; brendamoshea@...; janectyler@...; avram.barlowe@...; writepeg@...; oyler@...; ajbarlow@...; katiebelangerwilson@...; gavinl@...; chris@...; clevin1940@ aol.com; maya@...; monique@...
          Subject: Re: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           

          Education Activists,

          I say the answer is #3. If you chose #4, then you are saying that TFA is an EFFECTIVE program that has a positive effect on "the racial achievement gap."

          This question is a typical example of a hi stakes question where you are confined to the test maker's perspective on the world and does not allow you to think, much less critically think!

          in Struggle,

          Sam Anderson


          qhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhhqhq

           

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: MARK D. NAISON
          Sent: 11/30/11 08:23 PM
          To: sydralynn@..., sarahsolomon@..., simonebrown2003@..., juliereed15@..., kdi812@..., BDevale@..., irashor@..., schlosbon.jenna@..., itistime.nyc@..., romweb1@..., lauren.m.anderson@..., Keleju@..., davidgreene1949@..., gaxinthebronx@..., Omdrala@..., pequenalulu80@..., htaylor@..., bronxtom@..., mr.lamb@..., mkroby@..., castilloenglishteacher@..., JPRUITT@..., VICWISE@..., boogiedowner@..., janetm@..., classsizematters@..., normsco@..., martha_foote@..., BBDX@..., latsports@..., stan.karp@..., bryan.locascio@..., jose.sanchez@..., cwilder@..., dohugh@..., hburl1229@..., marianswer@..., rpc6@..., bncavaliere@..., purnell_amaez_family@..., Norm_Fruchter@..., samantha.cass@..., sam@..., wdesoto@..., annelooser@..., deven.black@..., jucelli@..., bstein@..., hphillips@..., straussv@..., hoenigedu@..., erica.terrell@..., meelah82@..., frank.johnson@..., stephanie.janaye@..., hilary.lustick@..., ssdanesh@..., tviola453@..., wmekuria@..., camika.royal@..., ajisom@..., acherrera@..., asalynch@..., dagonz@..., mhayes1@..., kerrykretchmar@..., gvirchick@..., kas.psom@..., bwpurplewins@..., joseph.rogers.jr@..., seanderson@..., h.s.quester@..., anu.okuyemi@..., judyperez1@..., kate_strom@..., bfteach@..., jasonpwatson@..., lvalencia@..., sosmarchmass@..., fjjazz@..., harlem120@..., jsiegel@..., samanthawinslow@..., nora.hyland@..., brendamoshea@..., janectyler@..., avram.barlowe@..., writepeg@..., oyler@..., ajbarlow@..., katiebelangerwilson@..., gavinl@..., chris@..., clevin1940@..., maya@..., monique@...
          Subject: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           

           

          00 billion to public education.

          The inequities documented in the report began to accumulate within a few years of the passage of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the main federal law on public schools, which channels money to educate poor children. To prevent them from simply substituting the federal antipoverty dollars for local funds, districts had to show that they were spending at least as much state and local education money in the poor schools getting federal money as they were spending in their more affluent schools.

          But a loophole allowed school systems to report educator salaries to Washington using a districtwide pay schedule, thus masking large salary gaps between the higher-paid veteran staffs in middle-class schools and the young teachers earning entry-level pay in poor parts of the district.

          A few researchers have documented the problem with statewide data in Florida and some other states, said Cynthia Brown, a vice president at the Center for American Progress, a liberal research group. “But I’m excited because this is the first time that data documenting the problem has ever been collected on a nationwide basis,” she said. “Many of us have known for a long time that in some individual districts the high-poverty schools weren’t getting their fair share of state and local funds.”

          Federal officials estimated that although the inequities were widespread, alleviating them would not be costly.

          “Providing low-income schools with comparable spending would cost as little as 1 percent of the average district’s total spending,” but the extra resources “would make a big impact by adding between 4 percent and 15 percent to the budget” of schools serving poor students, the department said in a statement.

          A version of this article appeared in print on December 1, 2011, on page A29 of the New York edition with the headline: Report: Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: S. E. Anderson [mailto:seanderson@...]
          Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 8:43 AM
          To: MARK D. NAISON; sydralynn@...; sarahsolomon@...; simonebrown2003@...; juliereed15@...; kdi812@...; BDevale@...; irashor@...; schlosbon.jenna@...; itistime.nyc@...; romweb1@...; lauren.m.anderson@...; Keleju@...; davidgreene1949@...; gaxinthebronx@...; Omdrala@...; pequenalulu80@...; htaylor@...; bronxtom@...; mr.lamb@...; mkroby@...; castilloenglishteacher@...; JPRUITT@...; VICWISE@...; boogiedowner@...; janetm@...; classsizematters@...; normsco@...; martha_foote@...; BBDX@...; latsports@...; stan.karp@...; bryan.locascio@...; jose.sanchez@...; cwilder@...; dohugh@...; hburl1229@...; marianswer@...; rpc6@...; bncavaliere@...; purnell_amaez_family@...; Norm_Fruchter@...; samantha.cass@...; sam@...; wdesoto@...; annelooser@...; deven.black@...; jucelli@... g; bstein@...; hphillips@...; straussv@...; hoenigedu@...; erica.terrell@...; meelah82@...; frank.johnson@...; stephanie.janaye@...; hilary.lustick@...; ssdanesh@...; tviola453@...; wmekuria@...; camika.royal@...; ajisom@...; acherrera@...; asalynch@...; dagonz@...; mhayes1@...; kerrykretchmar@...; gvirchick@...; kas.psom@...; bwpurplewins@...; joseph.rogers.jr@...; h.s.quester@...; anu.okuyemi@...; judyperez1@...; kate_strom@...; bfteach@...; jasonpwatson@...; lvalencia@...; sosmarchmass@...; fjjazz@...; harlem120@...; jsiegel@...; samanthawinslow@...; nora.hyland@...; brendamoshea@...; janectyler@...; avram.barlowe@...; writepeg@...; oyler@...; ajbarlow@...; katiebelangerwilson@...; gavinl@...; chris@...; clevin1940@ aol.com; maya@...; monique@...
          Subject: Re: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           

          Education Activists,

          I say the answer is #3. If you chose #4, then you are saying that TFA is an EFFECTIVE program that has a positive effect on "the racial achievement gap."

          This question is a typical example of a hi stakes question where you are confined to the test maker's perspective on the world and does not allow you to think, much less critically think!

          in Struggle,

          Sam Anderson


          qhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhqhhqhq

           

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: MARK D. NAISON
          Sent: 11/30/11 08:23 PM
          To: sydralynn@..., sarahsolomon@..., simonebrown2003@..., juliereed15@..., kdi812@..., BDevale@..., irashor@..., schlosbon.jenna@..., itistime.nyc@..., romweb1@..., lauren.m.anderson@..., Keleju@..., davidgreene1949@..., gaxinthebronx@..., Omdrala@..., pequenalulu80@..., htaylor@..., bronxtom@..., mr.lamb@..., mkroby@..., castilloenglishteacher@..., JPRUITT@..., VICWISE@..., boogiedowner@..., janetm@..., classsizematters@..., normsco@..., martha_foote@..., BBDX@..., latsports@..., stan.karp@..., bryan.locascio@..., jose.sanchez@..., cwilder@..., dohugh@..., hburl1229@..., marianswer@..., rpc6@..., bncavaliere@..., purnell_amaez_family@..., Norm_Fruchter@..., samantha.cass@..., sam@..., wdesoto@..., annelooser@..., deven.black@..., jucelli@..., bstein@..., hphillips@..., straussv@..., hoenigedu@..., erica.terrell@..., meelah82@..., frank.johnson@..., stephanie.janaye@..., hilary.lustick@..., ssdanesh@..., tviola453@..., wmekuria@..., camika.royal@..., ajisom@..., acherrera@..., asalynch@..., dagonz@..., mhayes1@..., kerrykretchmar@..., gvirchick@..., kas.psom@..., bwpurplewins@..., joseph.rogers.jr@..., seanderson@..., h.s.quester@..., anu.okuyemi@..., judyperez1@..., kate_strom@..., bfteach@..., jasonpwatson@..., lvalencia@..., sosmarchmass@..., fjjazz@..., harlem120@..., jsiegel@..., samanthawinslow@..., nora.hyland@..., brendamoshea@..., janectyler@..., avram.barlowe@..., writepeg@..., oyler@..., ajbarlow@..., katiebelangerwilson@..., gavinl@..., chris@..., clevin1940@..., maya@..., monique@...
          Subject: Fw: Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           

           


          Re: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           


          Janet


          to:


          MARK D. NAISON

          11/30/2011 08:12 PM

           


          Please respond to "Janet"


          I choose- 4- none of the above!  TFA is detrimental to the public educational system it purports to improve. Since its participants(it is incorrect to call them teachers )do not know how to teach either reading or math,subjects which truly require years of experience and training to master) or any other subject for that matter, they hinder the progress of their students and hold them back from real learning which further increases the achievement gap and decreases students' self esteem! TFA's total effect is negative!
          Janet Mayer

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: MARK D. NAISON
          To: sydralynn@... ; sarahsolomon@... ; simonebrown2003@... ; juliereed15@... ; kdi812@... ; BDevale@... ; irashor@... ; schlosbon.jenna@... ; itistime.nyc@... ; romweb1@... ; lauren.m.anderson@... ; Keleju@... ; davidgreene1949@... ; gaxinthebronx@... ; Omdrala@... ; pequenalulu80@... ; htaylor@... ; bronxtom@... ; mr.lamb@... ; mkroby@... ; castilloenglishteacher@... ; JPRUITT@... ; VICWISE@... ; boogiedowner@... ; janetm@... ; classsizematters@... ; normsco@... ; martha_foote@... ; BBDX@... ; latsports@... ; stan.karp@... ; bryan.locascio@... ; jose.sanchez@... ; cwilder@... ; dohugh@... ; hburl1229@... ; marianswer@... ; rpc6@... ; bncavaliere@... ; purnell_amaez_family@... ; Norm_Fruchter@... ; samantha.cass@... ; sam@... ; wdesoto@... ; annelooser@... ; deven.black@... ; jucelli@... ; bstein@... ; hphillips@... ; straussv@... ; hoenigedu@... ; erica.terrell@... ; meelah82@... ; frank.johnson@... ; stephanie.janaye@... ; hilary.lustick@... ; ssdanesh@... ; tviola453@... ; wmekuria@... ; camika.royal@... ; ajisom@... ; acherrera@... ; asalynch@... ; dagonz@... ; mhayes1@... ; kerrykretchmar@... ; gvirchick@... ; kas.psom@... ; bwpurplewins@... ; joseph.rogers.jr@... ; seanderson@... ; h.s.quester@... ; anu.okuyemi@... ; judyperez1@... ; kate_strom@... ; bfteach@... ; jasonpwatson@... ; lvalencia@... ; sosmarchmass@... ; fjjazz@... ; harlem120@... ; jsiegel@... ; samanthawinslow@... ; nora.hyland@... ; brendamoshea@... ; janectyler@... ; avram.barlowe@... ; writepeg@... ; oyler@... ; ajbarlow@... ; katiebelangerwilson@... ; gavinl@... ; chris@... ; clevin1940@... ; maya@... ; monique@...
          Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:53 PM
          Subject: A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

          [IMAGE]

          [IMAGE]

          A High Stakes Test Question for Educators

           

          [IMAGE]
          MARK D. NAISON

          [IMAGE]
          to:

          [IMAGE]
          naison

          [IMAGE]

          11/30/2011 06:52 PM

          Choose one of the following

          Is Teach for America

          1 A force for racial and economic equality?
          ...
          2 A finishing school for the 1 Percent?

          3. A highly publicized but ineffective program that lhas no effect whatsoever on "the racial achievement gap."

          4. None of the above










          Mark D Naison
          Professor of African American Studies and History
          Principal Investigator
          Bronx African American History Project
          640 Dealy Hall
          Fordham University
          Bronx, NY 10458
          Phone (718) 817-3748 Fax (718) 817-3385=

           




          ----------------------------------
          s. e. anderson
          author of The Black Holocaust for Beginners
          www.blackeducator.org
          www.blackeducator.blogspot.com
          If WORK was good for you, the rich would leave none for the poor. (Haiti) 
          --------------------------------------------

           

        • Josh Karan
          I AM SEEKING CURRENT COMPARATIVE STATS ON NYC SCHOOL SPENIDiNG vs THAT OF WEALTHIER NEIGHBORING SUBURBS Below is a letter I sent to Prof. Bruce Baker asking if
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 3, 2011
            I AM SEEKING CURRENT COMPARATIVE STATS ON NYC SCHOOL SPENIDiNG vs THAT OF WEALTHIER NEIGHBORING SUBURBS

            Below is a letter I sent to Prof. Bruce Baker asking if he has such data.

            If anyone else on this list serve has such data, or can direct me to a source for it, please do so:

            Thank you.

            Josh
            ----------------------------------------------------


            Bruce:

            I am an education organizer in NYC who worked with Robert Jackson to build support for the Campaign For Fiscal Equity. 
            I also conduct a Parent Advocacy Training Program in northern Manhattan.

            In the past I have used Jonathan Kozol's Shame of the City comparative stats on school spending in NYC public schools vs neighboring suburban districts in order to inform parents of the still present funding inequities.

            These stats are now very dated.

            Do you have current ones?

            --- NYC  Public Schools vs those in Scarsdale, Great Neck etc.

            --- NYC Public Schools vs elite prep school 

            --- NYC Public Schools vs Charter schools 


            Also:  How can I understand in these broad comparisons the amount which actually gets to a school in each of these categories.
            For instance, in NYC a $ 22 billion school budget is touted as representing an expenditure of $ 20,000 per pupitl
            Yet school in my high poverty, high ELL district receive around $ 8000
            What happens to the rest of the $ 12,000?
            Is this mismanagement? If so, how?
            Does NYC central provide more services (Special Ed, busing, food etc) than do other districts) that require more money from the overall budget than is spent in comparative districts?
            What is the comparative amount of money in the other categories that actually gets to the school itself?
            If there is a lesser differential, with less money diverted to non-direct school spending, why can they do those things cheaper?


            I will be grateful for any guidance you can give on these bedeviling questions.

            Thank you,

            Josh Karan
          • Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.