Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

Expand Messages
  • Leonie Haimson
    There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub schools with a higher
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 30, 2011
    • 0 Attachment

      There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub schools with a higher concentration of the at –risk kids in worse conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space.  This is pretty much true of all “choice” schools as well.

       

      It’s a divide and conquer mentality.

       

      Leonie Haimson

      Executive Director

      Class Size Matters

      124 Waverly Pl.

      New York, NY 10011

      212-674-7320

      leonie@...

      www.classsizematters.org

      http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

       

      Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

       

      Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

       

      Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

      Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

       

      From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
      Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
      To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

       

      I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher in District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter schools, but they should not be in their well-off neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where the schools are "failing".  I went up to Brad Lander and tried to have this conversation with him.  I said that one of the main reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year, unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods.  How about giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents.  Lisa N.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Karen Sprowal <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...>
      To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
      Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

      Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about more police than social workers

      in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of color.

       

      Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position

      of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being better served in

      "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA claims

      to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high needs areas."

      However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic schools

      resources in ANY of our schools?

      It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park, etc., but them?

       

      Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how all

      of this Stinks for everyone!

      Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his contact info? 

       

      Karen Sprowal 

       

       



      --- On Wed, 11/30/11, Noah Gotbaum <noah@...> wrote:


      From: Noah Gotbaum <noah@...>
      Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing
      To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: brian@...
      Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 12:59 PM

       

      Having attended the hearing last night in Cobble Hill, two things jump out re this press coverage:

      First - despite overwhelming community opposition, and almost zero community demand for the school - which the DOE no longer even tries to deny (Assemblymember Joan Millman noted last night that she hadn’t received “a single call” asking for a new charter in the area but had received 90 calls against the Success co-location) – the press still presents this as if the community is split and there are legitimate grounds for this co-location to take place.  The “balanced” presentations in this instance lead to truly unbalanced coverage of the story.

      Second – SUNY Trustee Noguera’s comment is of note:  “…we want to encourage (the charters) to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served…a school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.”  Wow! Quite a statement. Would someone in the press please ask Professor Noguera if he is going to follow up on this statement and recommend that SUNY deny the location and even revoke the charter?

      Sadly I am willing to bet the farm that Noguera will once again say one thing and do another, and rather than rejecting the location and the charter, he and his SUNY Trustee colleagues will continue to abrogate their responsibilities and instead let their “staff” at the SUNY Charter (Lobby) Institute rubber stamp the Cobble Hill co-location without so much as even a review or formal approval by Noguera and the other SUNY Trustees – which, by the way, is required under the state’s Charter.  What’s worse, the SUNY Trustees will do so without even once showing their faces to the parents, teachers and communities onto which their co-located charters – launched like drone missiles anonymously from Albany boardrooms – are wrecking havoc on our schools and children.  Democracy?

      noah

       

      From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
      Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 9:49 AM
      To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: brian@...
      Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

       

       

       

      Good video of Brian Jones at (NY1)  also some video at GothamSchools; both stories below.

       

      Protesters Disrupt DOE Hearing On Proposed Brooklyn Charter School

      By: Zack Fink, NY1

      The Department of Education held a meeting Tuesday at K293 in Cobble Hill to discuss a proposed 190-seat charter school that would be housed in the building, and opponents butted heads with supporters as dozens signed up to speak. NY1’s Zack Fink filed the following report.

      The K293 building in Cobble Hill is already home to two secondary schools and one special education program, but Department of Education officials say there's still space for 700 students.

      Success Academy Charter Schools wants to use up 190 of those spots for a charter that would serve kindergarten through fourth grade.

      Some parents say they're behind that idea.

      "2007 was a boom for Brooklyn. Lots and lots of babies. And we all need to go to elementary school. Some of us have great options in this neighborhood, others have less than stellar options, and it’s my ethical responsibility to find a good school for my son. So I'm supporting the charter school," said parent Liz Williams.

      But there were some fierce opponents at a public hearing Tuesday night.

      About 70 people signed up to speak, some of whom claimed to be part of the Occupy Wall Street movement. One person was ejected.

      For other opponents, the issue is about how public resources are allocated.

      "Unfortunately, the DOE doesn't seem to put the same priority, love and interest in building up the public schools that they do with charters, and it just raises a lot of questions,” said teacher Brian Jones. “Why do they have to come into public school buildings, why do we have to have a competitive system of education?"

      A competing plan is also on the table for the space. Elected officials and others want to use it for an early childhood education program.

      "There is an enormous need in this district for pre-K and K classes. They are all oversubscribed. You even have to pay a lot of money to go to private pre-K and K, and they are oversubscribed, too," saod Assemblywoman Joan Millman.

      The panel for educational policy has scheduled a vote on the co-location for December 14. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been supportive, controls a majority of votes on the panel, and the co-location is expected to be approved.

       

       

      Showdown set for year’s first charter school co-location hearing

      by Rachel Cromidas, at 4:48 pm

      http://gothamschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/020111-pep-300x188.jpg

      Many of the attendees who lined up outside Brooklyn Tech for last February's Panel for Educational Policy meeting came to protest the creation of a Success Academy Charter School on the Upper West Side.

      Back-to-back rallies set for this afternoon augur a contentious co-location hearing for the newest outpost in the Success Charter Network.

      The creation of Cobble Hill Success Academy, which won approval earlier this year to open next fall in Brooklyn’s District 13, has sparked conflict in District 15, the location of the school’s proposed site. Advocates and critics of the city’s plan to co-locate the charter school with two secondary schools and a special education program will lay out their cases during tonight’s public hearing — and beforehand, in rallies set for outside the Baltic Street building.

      The public hearing is the first of the year and ushers in a season of rancorous co-location hearings.

      Some families have lamented crowding in high-performing local elementary schools and said they would appreciate new options. But others say they are worried that the new school would strain resources at the proposed site without effectively serving the high-needs populations it was originally intended to serve.

      Cobble Hill Success’s promise to serve low-income, immigrant families in District 13 was a boon to its application, according to Pedro Noguera, an education professor who green-lighted the school’s original application as a member of the State University of New York’s Charter Schools Institute.

      “We have tried to take the position recently that we can put charter schools where there is clearly a need for better schools for kids, so targeting the more disadvantaged communities. We have also seen the areas that are a saturation of charter schools, so we want to encourage them to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served,” said Noguera, who will be participating in an education debate this evening in the West Village. ”A school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.” 

      At 5 p.m. parents from District 15 will hold a press conference outside of the Cobble Hill school, “to demand the City’s Department of Education award public space to Success Academy Cobble Hill,” according to a press release sent out by a communications firm that works with the Success Academy Charter Network.

      The network’s CEO, Eva Moskowitz, has seemed to court controversy when seeking spacefor her schools. Co-location battles have followed her forays into schools in Brooklyn, Harlem, and the Upper West Side, and the network has in the past bused groups of parents from its schools, often wearing signature orange T-shirts, to co-location hearings.

      At 5:30 p.m., opponents of the co-location are planning to rally in front of the school to renew calls for an alternative proposal: to open an early childhood center in the building instead of a charter school. Yesterday a vocal group of parents, state and union officials rallied at the building’s Baltic Street entrance in support of that proposal, arguing that the local elementary schools are turning away families who apply for preschool.

      Organizers of the protest say they will argue that the charter school would not address crowding issues in Brownstone Brooklyn’s elementary schools because its lottery admissions would allow students from other parts of the city to apply, and it also would not address the demand for more preschool programs.

      Community members and educators from the two secondary schools that currently share space in the four-story building, along with a District 75 special education program, have also said that an additional charter school could overcrowd the high schools’ shared facilities.

       

       

      Leonie Haimson

      Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

      New York, NY 10011

      212-674-7320

       

      Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

       

      Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

       

      Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

       

       

       

       

       

    • Deborah Meier
      Has anyone desegregated free vs reduced lunch data on public vs charter schools? Deb ... Deborah Meier Note: latest book!! Playing For Keeps (TC Press) by D.
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Has anyone desegregated free vs reduced lunch data on public vs charter schools?

        Deb
        -----
        Deborah Meier

        Note: latest book!! Playing For Keeps (TC Press) by D. Meier, Brenda Engel and Beth Taylor

        NOTE: new e-mail address.  deborahmeier@...

        For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com







        On Nov 30, 2011, at 11:43 PM, Leonie Haimson wrote:

         

        There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub schools with a higher concentration of the at –risk kids in worse conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space.  This is pretty much true of all “choice” schools as well.

         

        It’s a divide and conquer mentality.

         

        Leonie Haimson

        Executive Director

        Class Size Matters

        124 Waverly Pl.

        New York, NY 10011

        212-674-7320

        leonie@...

        www.classsizematters.org

        http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

         

        Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

         

        Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

         

        Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

         

        From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

         

        I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher in District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter schools, but they should not be in their well-off neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where the schools are "failing".  I went up to Brad Lander and tried to have this conversation with him.  I said that one of the main reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year, unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods.  How about giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents.  Lisa N.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Karen Sprowal <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...>
        To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
        Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

        Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about more police than social workers

        in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of color.

         

        Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position

        of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being better served in

        "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA claims

        to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high needs areas."

        However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic schools

        resources in ANY of our schools?

        It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park, etc., but them?

         

        Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how all

        of this Stinks for everyone!

        Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his contact info? 

         

        Karen Sprowal 

         

         



        --- On Wed, 11/30/11, Noah Gotbaum <noah@...> wrote:


        From: Noah Gotbaum <noah@...>
        Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing
        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: brian@...
        Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 12:59 PM

         

        Having attended the hearing last night in Cobble Hill, two things jump out re this press coverage:

        First - despite overwhelming community opposition, and almost zero community demand for the school - which the DOE no longer even tries to deny (Assemblymember Joan Millman noted last night that she hadn’t received “a single call” asking for a new charter in the area but had received 90 calls against the Success co-location) – the press still presents this as if the community is split and there are legitimate grounds for this co-location to take place.  The “balanced” presentations in this instance lead to truly unbalanced coverage of the story.

        Second – SUNY Trustee Noguera’s comment is of note:  “…we want to encourage (the charters) to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served…a school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.”  Wow! Quite a statement. Would someone in the press please ask Professor Noguera if he is going to follow up on this statement and recommend that SUNY deny the location and even revoke the charter?

        Sadly I am willing to bet the farm that Noguera will once again say one thing and do another, and rather than rejecting the location and the charter, he and his SUNY Trustee colleagues will continue to abrogate their responsibilities and instead let their “staff” at the SUNY Charter (Lobby) Institute rubber stamp the Cobble Hill co-location without so much as even a review or formal approval by Noguera and the other SUNY Trustees – which, by the way, is required under the state’s Charter.  What’s worse, the SUNY Trustees will do so without even once showing their faces to the parents, teachers and communities onto which their co-located charters – launched like drone missiles anonymously from Albany boardrooms – are wrecking havoc on our schools and children.  Democracy?

        noah

         

        From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 9:49 AM
        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: brian@...
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

         

         

         

        Good video of Brian Jones at (NY1)  also some video at GothamSchools; both stories below.

         

        Protesters Disrupt DOE Hearing On Proposed Brooklyn Charter School

        By: Zack Fink, NY1

        The Department of Education held a meeting Tuesday at K293 in Cobble Hill to discuss a proposed 190-seat charter school that would be housed in the building, and opponents butted heads with supporters as dozens signed up to speak. NY1’s Zack Fink filed the following report.

        The K293 building in Cobble Hill is already home to two secondary schools and one special education program, but Department of Education officials say there's still space for 700 students.

        Success Academy Charter Schools wants to use up 190 of those spots for a charter that would serve kindergarten through fourth grade.

        Some parents say they're behind that idea.

        "2007 was a boom for Brooklyn. Lots and lots of babies. And we all need to go to elementary school. Some of us have great options in this neighborhood, others have less than stellar options, and it’s my ethical responsibility to find a good school for my son. So I'm supporting the charter school," said parent Liz Williams.

        But there were some fierce opponents at a public hearing Tuesday night.

        About 70 people signed up to speak, some of whom claimed to be part of the Occupy Wall Street movement. One person was ejected.

        For other opponents, the issue is about how public resources are allocated.

        "Unfortunately, the DOE doesn't seem to put the same priority, love and interest in building up the public schools that they do with charters, and it just raises a lot of questions,” said teacher Brian Jones. “Why do they have to come into public school buildings, why do we have to have a competitive system of education?"

        A competing plan is also on the table for the space. Elected officials and others want to use it for an early childhood education program.

        "There is an enormous need in this district for pre-K and K classes. They are all oversubscribed. You even have to pay a lot of money to go to private pre-K and K, and they are oversubscribed, too," saod Assemblywoman Joan Millman.

        The panel for educational policy has scheduled a vote on the co-location for December 14. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been supportive, controls a majority of votes on the panel, and the co-location is expected to be approved.

         

         

        Showdown set for year’s first charter school co-location hearing

        by Rachel Cromidas, at 4:48 pm

        Many of the attendees who lined up outside Brooklyn Tech for last February's Panel for Educational Policy meeting came to protest the creation of a Success Academy Charter School on the Upper West Side.

        Back-to-back rallies set for this afternoon augur a contentious co-location hearing for the newest outpost in the Success Charter Network.

        The creation of Cobble Hill Success Academy, which won approval earlier this year to open next fall in Brooklyn’s District 13, has sparked conflict in District 15, the location of the school’s proposed site. Advocates and critics of the city’s plan to co-locate the charter school with two secondary schools and a special education program will lay out their cases during tonight’s public hearing — and beforehand, in rallies set for outside the Baltic Street building.

        The public hearing is the first of the year and ushers in a season of rancorous co-location hearings.

        Some families have lamented crowding in high-performing local elementary schools and said they would appreciate new options. But others say they are worried that the new school would strain resources at the proposed site without effectively serving the high-needs populations it was originally intended to serve.

        Cobble Hill Success’s promise to serve low-income, immigrant families in District 13 was a boon to its application, according to Pedro Noguera, an education professor who green-lighted the school’s original application as a member of the State University of New York’s Charter Schools Institute.

        “We have tried to take the position recently that we can put charter schools where there is clearly a need for better schools for kids, so targeting the more disadvantaged communities. We have also seen the areas that are a saturation of charter schools, so we want to encourage them to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served,” said Noguera, who will be participating in an education debate this evening in the West Village. ”A school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.” 

        At 5 p.m. parents from District 15 will hold a press conference outside of the Cobble Hill school, “to demand the City’s Department of Education award public space to Success Academy Cobble Hill,” according to a press release sent out by a communications firm that works with the Success Academy Charter Network.

        The network’s CEO, Eva Moskowitz, has seemed to court controversy when seeking spacefor her schools. Co-location battles have followed her forays into schools in Brooklyn, Harlem, and the Upper West Side, and the network has in the past bused groups of parents from its schools, often wearing signature orange T-shirts, to co-location hearings.

        At 5:30 p.m., opponents of the co-location are planning to rally in front of the school to renew calls for an alternative proposal: to open an early childhood center in the building instead of a charter school. Yesterday a vocal group of parents, state and union officials rallied at the building’s Baltic Street entrance in support of that proposal, arguing that the local elementary schools are turning away families who apply for preschool.

        Organizers of the protest say they will argue that the charter school would not address crowding issues in Brownstone Brooklyn’s elementary schools because its lottery admissions would allow students from other parts of the city to apply, and it also would not address the demand for more preschool programs.

        Community members and educators from the two secondary schools that currently share space in the four-story building, along with a District 75 special education program, have also said that an additional charter school could overcrowd the high schools’ shared facilities.

         

         

        Leonie Haimson

        Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

        New York, NY 10011

        212-674-7320

         

        Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

         

        Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

         

        Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

         

         

         

         

         



      • Leonie Haimson
        For NYC yes Bruce Baker here: http://nepc.colorado.edu/newsletter/2011/01/second-look-new-york-city-charte r-schools NYSUT here:
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2011
        • 0 Attachment

          For NYC yes

           

          Bruce Baker here: http://nepc.colorado.edu/newsletter/2011/01/second-look-new-york-city-charter-schools

           

          NYSUT  here:  http://www.nysut.org/files/media_100427_charterschools.pdf

           

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Deborah Meier
          Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 11:41 AM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

           

           

          Has anyone desegregated free vs reduced lunch data on public vs charter schools?

           

          Deb

          -----

          Deborah Meier

           

          Note: latest book!! Playing For Keeps (TC Press) by D. Meier, Brenda Engel and Beth Taylor

           

          NOTE: new e-mail address.  deborahmeier@...

           

          For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

          On Nov 30, 2011, at 11:43 PM, Leonie Haimson wrote:



           

           

          There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub schools with a higher concentration of the at –risk kids in worse conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space.  This is pretty much true of all “choice” schools as well.

           

          It’s a divide and conquer mentality.

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
          Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

           

          I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher in District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter schools, but they should not be in their well-off neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where the schools are "failing".  I went up to Brad Lander and tried to have this conversation with him.  I said that one of the main reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year, unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods.  How about giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents.  Lisa N.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Karen Sprowal <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...>
          To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

          Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about more police than social workers

          in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of color.

           

          Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position

          of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being better served in

          "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA claims

          to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high needs areas."

          However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic schools

          resources in ANY of our schools?

          It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park, etc., but them?

           

          Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how all

          of this Stinks for everyone!

          Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his contact info? 

           

          Karen Sprowal 

           

           



          --- On Wed, 11/30/11, Noah Gotbaum <noah@...> wrote:


          From: Noah Gotbaum <noah@...>
          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: brian@...
          Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 12:59 PM

           

          Having attended the hearing last night in Cobble Hill, two things jump out re this press coverage:

          First - despite overwhelming community opposition, and almost zero community demand for the school - which the DOE no longer even tries to deny (Assemblymember Joan Millman noted last night that she hadn’t received “a single call” asking for a new charter in the area but had received 90 calls against the Success co-location) – the press still presents this as if the community is split and there are legitimate grounds for this co-location to take place.  The “balanced” presentations in this instance lead to truly unbalanced coverage of the story.

          Second – SUNY Trustee Noguera’s comment is of note:  “…we want to encourage (the charters) to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served…a school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.”  Wow! Quite a statement. Would someone in the press please ask Professor Noguera if he is going to follow up on this statement and recommend that SUNY deny the location and even revoke the charter?

          Sadly I am willing to bet the farm that Noguera will once again say one thing and do another, and rather than rejecting the location and the charter, he and his SUNY Trustee colleagues will continue to abrogate their responsibilities and instead let their “staff” at the SUNY Charter (Lobby) Institute rubber stamp the Cobble Hill co-location without so much as even a review or formal approval by Noguera and the other SUNY Trustees – which, by the way, is required under the state’s Charter.  What’s worse, the SUNY Trustees will do so without even once showing their faces to the parents, teachers and communities onto which their co-located charters – launched like drone missiles anonymously from Albany boardrooms – are wrecking havoc on our schools and children.  Democracy?

          noah

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
          Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 9:49 AM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: brian@...
          Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

           

           

           

          Good video of Brian Jones at (NY1)  also some video at GothamSchools; both stories below.

           

          Protesters Disrupt DOE Hearing On Proposed Brooklyn Charter School

          By: Zack Fink, NY1

          The Department of Education held a meeting Tuesday at K293 in Cobble Hill to discuss a proposed 190-seat charter school that would be housed in the building, and opponents butted heads with supporters as dozens signed up to speak. NY1’s Zack Fink filed the following report.

          The K293 building in Cobble Hill is already home to two secondary schools and one special education program, but Department of Education officials say there's still space for 700 students.

          Success Academy Charter Schools wants to use up 190 of those spots for a charter that would serve kindergarten through fourth grade.

          Some parents say they're behind that idea.

          "2007 was a boom for Brooklyn. Lots and lots of babies. And we all need to go to elementary school. Some of us have great options in this neighborhood, others have less than stellar options, and it’s my ethical responsibility to find a good school for my son. So I'm supporting the charter school," said parent Liz Williams.

          But there were some fierce opponents at a public hearing Tuesday night.

          About 70 people signed up to speak, some of whom claimed to be part of the Occupy Wall Street movement. One person was ejected.

          For other opponents, the issue is about how public resources are allocated.

          "Unfortunately, the DOE doesn't seem to put the same priority, love and interest in building up the public schools that they do with charters, and it just raises a lot of questions,” said teacher Brian Jones. “Why do they have to come into public school buildings, why do we have to have a competitive system of education?"

          A competing plan is also on the table for the space. Elected officials and others want to use it for an early childhood education program.

          "There is an enormous need in this district for pre-K and K classes. They are all oversubscribed. You even have to pay a lot of money to go to private pre-K and K, and they are oversubscribed, too," saod Assemblywoman Joan Millman.

          The panel for educational policy has scheduled a vote on the co-location for December 14. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been supportive, controls a majority of votes on the panel, and the co-location is expected to be approved.

           

           

          Showdown set for year’s first charter school co-location hearing

          by Rachel Cromidas, at 4:48 pm

          Many of the attendees who lined up outside Brooklyn Tech for last February's Panel for Educational Policy meeting came to protest the creation of a Success Academy Charter School on the Upper West Side.

          Back-to-back rallies set for this afternoon augur a contentious co-location hearing for the newest outpost in the Success Charter Network.

          The creation of Cobble Hill Success Academy, which won approval earlier this year to open next fall in Brooklyn’s District 13, has sparked conflict in District 15, the location of the school’s proposed site. Advocates and critics of the city’s plan to co-locate the charter school with two secondary schools and a special education program will lay out their cases during tonight’s public hearing — and beforehand, in rallies set for outside the Baltic Street building.

          The public hearing is the first of the year and ushers in a season of rancorous co-location hearings.

          Some families have lamented crowding in high-performing local elementary schools and said they would appreciate new options. But others say they are worried that the new school would strain resources at the proposed site without effectively serving the high-needs populations it was originally intended to serve.

          Cobble Hill Success’s promise to serve low-income, immigrant families in District 13 was a boon to its application, according to Pedro Noguera, an education professor who green-lighted the school’s original application as a member of the State University of New York’s Charter Schools Institute.

          “We have tried to take the position recently that we can put charter schools where there is clearly a need for better schools for kids, so targeting the more disadvantaged communities. We have also seen the areas that are a saturation of charter schools, so we want to encourage them to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served,” said Noguera, who will be participating in an education debate this evening in the West Village. ”A school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.” 

          At 5 p.m. parents from District 15 will hold a press conference outside of the Cobble Hill school, “to demand the City’s Department of Education award public space to Success Academy Cobble Hill,” according to a press release sent out by a communications firm that works with the Success Academy Charter Network.

          The network’s CEO, Eva Moskowitz, has seemed to court controversy when seeking spacefor her schools. Co-location battles have followed her forays into schools in Brooklyn, Harlem, and the Upper West Side, and the network has in the past bused groups of parents from its schools, often wearing signature orange T-shirts, to co-location hearings.

          At 5:30 p.m., opponents of the co-location are planning to rally in front of the school to renew calls for an alternative proposal: to open an early childhood center in the building instead of a charter school. Yesterday a vocal group of parents, state and union officials rallied at the building’s Baltic Street entrance in support of that proposal, arguing that the local elementary schools are turning away families who apply for preschool.

          Organizers of the protest say they will argue that the charter school would not address crowding issues in Brownstone Brooklyn’s elementary schools because its lottery admissions would allow students from other parts of the city to apply, and it also would not address the demand for more preschool programs.

          Community members and educators from the two secondary schools that currently share space in the four-story building, along with a District 75 special education program, have also said that an additional charter school could overcrowd the high schools’ shared facilities.

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

           

          Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

        • Karen Sprowal
          Absolutely! HSA rapid expansion of their chain in Harlem failing schools  had virtually no push back from parents. To date-no accountability for pushing
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Absolutely!
            HSA rapid expansion of their chain in Harlem "failing schools" had virtually no push back from parents. To date-no accountability for pushing out IEP/ELL children, it's for sure a much broader DOE plan. Most of these schools are now faced with a concentrated flow of these children with continued depletion of resources, it criminal!  I hope most of us agree they shouldn't be in any public schools, anywhere. The last thing we need among us is any kind of "ism divide."
            Thanks Leonie, Lisa and others for your feedback on this! 
             
             
              On Wed, 11/30/11, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

            From: Leonie Haimson <leonie@...>
            Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 11:43 PM

             

            There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub schools with a higher concentration of the at –risk kids in worse conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space.  This is pretty much true of all “choice” schools as well.

             

            It’s a divide and conquer mentality.

             

            Leonie Haimson

            Executive Director

            Class Size Matters

            124 Waverly Pl.

            New York, NY 10011

            212-674-7320

            leonie@...

            www.classsizematters.org

            http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

             

            Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

             

            Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

             

            Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

             

            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
            Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

             

            I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher in District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter schools, but they should not be in their well-off neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where the schools are "failing".  I went up to Brad Lander and tried to have this conversation with him.  I said that one of the main reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year, unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods.  How about giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents.  Lisa N.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Karen Sprowal <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...>
            To: nyceducationnews <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
            Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

            in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of color.

             

            Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position

            of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being better served in

            "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA claims

            to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high needs areas."

            However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic schools

            resources in ANY of our schools?

            It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park, etc., but them?

             

            Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how all

            of this Stinks for everyone!

            Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his contact info? 

             

            Karen Sprowal 

             

             



            --- On Wed, 11/30/11, Noah Gotbaum <noah@...> wrote:


            From: Noah Gotbaum <noah@...>
            Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: brian@...
            Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 12:59 PM

             

            Having attended the hearing last night in Cobble Hill, two things jump out re this press coverage:

            First - despite overwhelming community opposition, and almost zero community demand for the school - which the DOE no longer even tries to deny (Assemblymember Joan Millman noted last night that she hadn’t received “a single call” asking for a new charter in the area but had received 90 calls against the Success co-location) – the press still presents this as if the community is split and there are legitimate grounds for this co-location to take place.  The “balanced” presentations in this instance lead to truly unbalanced coverage of the story.

            Second – SUNY Trustee Noguera’s comment is of note:  “…we want to encourage (the charters) to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served…a school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.”  Wow! Quite a statement. Would someone in the press please ask Professor Noguera if he is going to follow up on this statement and recommend that SUNY deny the location and even revoke the charter?

            Sadly I am willing to bet the farm that Noguera will once again say one thing and do another, and rather than rejecting the location and the charter, he and his SUNY Trustee colleagues will continue to abrogate their responsibilities and instead let their “staff” at the SUNY Charter (Lobby) Institute rubber stamp the Cobble Hill co-location without so much as even a review or formal approval by Noguera and the other SUNY Trustees – which, by the way, is required under the state’s Charter.  What’s worse, the SUNY Trustees will do so without even once showing their faces to the parents, teachers and communities onto which their co-located charters – launched like drone missiles anonymously from Albany boardrooms – are wrecking havoc on our schools and children.  Democracy?

            noah

             

            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
            Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 9:49 AM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: brian@...
            Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's charter hearing

             

             

             

            Good video of Brian Jones at (NY1)  also some video at GothamSchools; both stories below.

             

            Protesters Disrupt DOE Hearing On Proposed Brooklyn Charter School

            By: Zack Fink, NY1

            The Department of Education held a meeting Tuesday at K293 in Cobble Hill to discuss a proposed 190-seat charter school that would be housed in the building, and opponents butted heads with supporters as dozens signed up to speak. NY1’s Zack Fink filed the following report.

            The K293 building in Cobble Hill is already home to two secondary schools and one special education program, but Department of Education officials say there's still space for 700 students.

            Success Academy Charter Schools wants to use up 190 of those spots for a charter that would serve kindergarten through fourth grade.

            Some parents say they're behind that idea.

            "2007 was a boom for Brooklyn. Lots and lots of babies. And we all need to go to elementary school. Some of us have great options in this neighborhood, others have less than stellar options, and it’s my ethical responsibility to find a good school for my son. So I'm supporting the charter school," said parent Liz Williams.

            But there were some fierce opponents at a public hearing Tuesday night.

            About 70 people signed up to speak, some of whom claimed to be part of the Occupy Wall Street movement. One person was ejected.

            For other opponents, the issue is about how public resources are allocated.

            "Unfortunately, the DOE doesn't seem to put the same priority, love and interest in building up the public schools that they do with charters, and it just raises a lot of questions,” said teacher Brian Jones. “Why do they have to come into public school buildings, why do we have to have a competitive system of education?"

            A competing plan is also on the table for the space. Elected officials and others want to use it for an early childhood education program.

            "There is an enormous need in this district for pre-K and K classes. They are all oversubscribed. You even have to pay a lot of money to go to private pre-K and K, and they are oversubscribed, too," saod Assemblywoman Joan Millman.

            The panel for educational policy has scheduled a vote on the co-location for December 14. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been supportive, controls a majority of votes on the panel, and the co-location is expected to be approved.

             

             

            Showdown set for year’s first charter school co-location hearing

            by Rachel Cromidas, at 4:48 pm

            http://gothamschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/020111-pep-300x188.jpg

            Many of the attendees who lined up outside Brooklyn Tech for last February's Panel for Educational Policy meeting came to protest the creation of a Success Academy Charter School on the Upper West Side.

            Back-to-back rallies set for this afternoon augur a contentious co-location hearing for the newest outpost in the Success Charter Network.

            The creation of Cobble Hill Success Academy, which won approval earlier this year to open next fall in Brooklyn’s District 13, has sparked conflict in District 15, the location of the school’s proposed site. Advocates and critics of the city’s plan to co-locate the charter school with two secondary schools and a special education program will lay out their cases during tonight’s public hearing — and beforehand, in rallies set for outside the Baltic Street building.

            The public hearing is the first of the year and ushers in a season of rancorous co-location hearings.

            Some families have lamented crowding in high-performing local elementary schools and said they would appreciate new options. But others say they are worried that the new school would strain resources at the proposed site without effectively serving the high-needs populations it was originally intended to serve.

            Cobble Hill Success’s promise to serve low-income, immigrant families in District 13 was a boon to its application, according to Pedro Noguera, an education professor who green-lighted the school’s original application as a member of the State University of New York’s Charter Schools Institute.

            “We have tried to take the position recently that we can put charter schools where there is clearly a need for better schools for kids, so targeting the more disadvantaged communities. We have also seen the areas that are a saturation of charter schools, so we want to encourage them to open in areas that have a high need and aren’t being served,” said Noguera, who will be participating in an education debate this evening in the West Village. ”A school in Cobble Hill clearly does not meet that criteria.” 

            At 5 p.m. parents from District 15 will hold a press conference outside of the Cobble Hill school, “to demand the City’s Department of Education award public space to Success Academy Cobble Hill,” according to a press release sent out by a communications firm that works with the Success Academy Charter Network.

            The network’s CEO, Eva Moskowitz, has seemed to court controversy when seeking spacefor her schools. Co-location battles have followed her forays into schools in Brooklyn, Harlem, and the Upper West Side, and the network has in the past bused groups of parents from its schools, often wearing signature orange T-shirts, to co-location hearings.

            At 5:30 p.m., opponents of the co-location are planning to rally in front of the school to renew calls for an alternative proposal: to open an early childhood center in the building instead of a charter school. Yesterday a vocal group of parents, state and union officials rallied at the building’s Baltic Street entrance in support of that proposal, arguing that the local elementary schools are turning away families who apply for preschool.

            Organizers of the protest say they will argue that the charter school would not address crowding issues in Brownstone Brooklyn’s elementary schools because its lottery admissions would allow students from other parts of the city to apply, and it also would not address the demand for more preschool programs.

            Community members and educators from the two secondary schools that currently share space in the four-story building, along with a District 75 special education program, have also said that an additional charter school could overcrowd the high schools’ shared facilities.

             

             

            Leonie Haimson

            Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

            New York, NY 10011

            212-674-7320

             

            Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

             

            Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

             

            Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

             

             

             

             

            Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about more police than social workers

             

          • James D
            The fact that you needed to ask what my name is tells me that you have no idea what the dynamics of District 15 are. If you did, you might know that I worked
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 1, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              The fact that you needed to ask what my name is tells me that you have
              no idea what the dynamics of District 15 are.

              If you did, you might know that I worked for years fighting the PAVE
              Academy Charter School's co-location in Red Hook (for which I was called
              a racist by Mona Davids when she was on the other side). Indeed, I was
              one of the plaintiffs in the first Mulgrew lawsuit that (albeit
              temporarily) stopped the first round of mass closings and co-locations
              two years ago.

              Since then, I took a leading role in stopping the effort to create
              another Charter School in Red Hook tailored to serve "newcomers" (i.e
              White Yuppies) into that neighborhood BECAUSE it would have exacerbated
              school segregation there (If interested, you can look up my piece in
              EdVox on the subject). For my troubles on that one, I was called an
              "asshole" at the hearing Tuesday night by the unsuccessful applicant.

              If you cared to learn about our District, you would also discover that,
              for better or worse, District 15 has been a leading advocate for
              "choice" since the Nineties. Thus, our Middle Schools are not zoned and
              the Brooklyn New School (which many on this listserv ADORE) and the
              Children's School (an outstanding CTT school) ostensibly admit their
              students via "lotteries".

              Because of that history, CEC-15 has never taken an absolute stand in
              opposition to all Charter Schools. For instance, we recently offered no
              objection to a TRANSFER Charter School applicant for Sunset Park nor to
              an environmentally oriented Middle School Charter application. In both
              instances, we were persuaded that each proposal addressed real needs in
              our District that were NOT being sufficiently addressed by our public
              schools. Likewise, while opposing the DOE's proposed co-locations, I
              spent an inordinate amount of time last winter and spring trying to help
              find an appropriate temporary space for a popular existing Secondary
              Charter School.

              As to the questions I raised at the hearing, I offer no apologies. What
              I was trying to demonstrate was the DOE and Success Academy's egregious
              hypocrisy in applying to open a Charter School for high needs children
              in areas served by "failing schools", when in fact, their real target
              was middle class children (and most importantly, their affluent parents)
              in an area where NONE of the schools can be considered "failing".

              Perhaps I wasn't as clear as I could have been, but your assumption that
              we (or for that matter, our elected officials) were engaging in NIMBY
              politics was WAY off the mark.

              As to Leonie's observation about "choice" in general, that is a topic
              VERY worthy of a serious conversation. Personally, I am ambivalent. I
              am aware of the tendencies towards "creaming" and segregation that
              choice often engenders. But I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the work
              of Deborah Meier and the "small schools movement" either.

              If that leaves you "extremely offended", so be it. The real world is
              complicated.
              ____________
              Jim Devor President, CEC-15 follow me on
              Twitter @JimDevor


              L


              --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, Karen Sprowal
              <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...> wrote:
              >
              > Absolutely!
              > HSA rapid expansion of their chain in Harlem "failing
              schools"Â had virtually no push back from parents. To date-no
              accountability for pushing out IEP/ELL children, it's for sure a
              much broader DOE plan. Most of these schools are now faced with a
              concentrated flow of these children with continued depletion ofÂ
              resources, it criminal!  I hope most of us agree they
              shouldn't be in any public schools, anywhere. The last thing we need
              among us is any kind of "ism divide."
              > Thanks Leonie, Lisa and others for your feedback on this!Â
              > Â
              > Â
              > Â Â On Wed, 11/30/11, Leonie Haimson leonie@... wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: Leonie Haimson leonie@...
              > Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
              charter hearing
              > To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 11:43 PM
              >
              >
              > Â
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools
              by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub
              schools with a higher concentration of the at â€"risk kids in worse
              conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space. This is pretty much
              true of all “choice” schools as well.
              > Â
              > It’s a divide and conquer mentality.
              > Â
              > Leonie Haimson
              > Executive Director
              > Class Size Matters
              > 124 Waverly Pl.
              > New York, NY 10011
              > 212-674-7320
              > leonie@...
              > www.classsizematters.org
              > http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com
              > http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson
              > Â
              > Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson
              > Â
              > Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!
              > Â
              > Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing
              classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing
              nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Â
              >
              > From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
              > Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
              > To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
              charter hearing
              > Â
              > I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher inÂ
              District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people
              (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter
              schools, but they should not be in their well-off
              neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where
              the schools are "failing". Â I went up to Brad Lander and tried to
              have this conversation with him. Â I said that one of the main
              reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do
              not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our
              students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year,
              unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods. Â How about
              giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in
              charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents. Â
              Lisa N.
              >
              >
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Karen Sprowal katherine_sprowal_cucs@...
              > To: nyceducationnews nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
              > Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
              charter hearing
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about
              more police than social workers
              >
              > in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of
              color.
              >
              > Â
              >
              > Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position
              >
              > of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being
              better served in
              >
              > "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA
              claims
              >
              > to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high
              needs areas."
              >
              > However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic
              schools
              >
              > resources in ANY of our schools?
              >
              > It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park,
              etc., but them?
              >
              > Â
              >
              > Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how
              all
              >
              > of this Stinks for everyone!
              >
              > Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his
              contact info?Â
              >
              > Â
              >
              > Karen SprowalÂ
              >
              > Â
              >
              > Â
              >
            • Deborah Meier
              James (an others), Read my latest--plus next week s--column on my website (deborahmeier.com) re my thoughts on choice. Thanks for the boost--but I too have
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 1, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                James (an others),  Read my latest--plus next week's--column on my website (deborahmeier.com) re my thoughts on choice.  Thanks for the boost--but I too have your ambivalence.   Deb
                -----
                Deborah Meier

                Note: latest book!! Playing For Keeps (TC Press) by D. Meier, Brenda Engel and Beth Taylor

                NOTE: new e-mail address.  deborahmeier@...

                For more information see website:  http://www.deborahmeier.com







                On Dec 1, 2011, at 7:40 PM, James D wrote:

                 

                The fact that you needed to ask what my name is tells me that you have
                no idea what the dynamics of District 15 are.

                If you did, you might know that I worked for years fighting the PAVE
                Academy Charter School's co-location in Red Hook (for which I was called
                a racist by Mona Davids when she was on the other side). Indeed, I was
                one of the plaintiffs in the first Mulgrew lawsuit that (albeit
                temporarily) stopped the first round of mass closings and co-locations
                two years ago.

                Since then, I took a leading role in stopping the effort to create
                another Charter School in Red Hook tailored to serve "newcomers" (i.e
                White Yuppies) into that neighborhood BECAUSE it would have exacerbated
                school segregation there (If interested, you can look up my piece in
                EdVox on the subject). For my troubles on that one, I was called an
                "asshole" at the hearing Tuesday night by the unsuccessful applicant.

                If you cared to learn about our District, you would also discover that,
                for better or worse, District 15 has been a leading advocate for
                "choice" since the Nineties. Thus, our Middle Schools are not zoned and
                the Brooklyn New School (which many on this listserv ADORE) and the
                Children's School (an outstanding CTT school) ostensibly admit their
                students via "lotteries".

                Because of that history, CEC-15 has never taken an absolute stand in
                opposition to all Charter Schools. For instance, we recently offered no
                objection to a TRANSFER Charter School applicant for Sunset Park nor to
                an environmentally oriented Middle School Charter application. In both
                instances, we were persuaded that each proposal addressed real needs in
                our District that were NOT being sufficiently addressed by our public
                schools. Likewise, while opposing the DOE's proposed co-locations, I
                spent an inordinate amount of time last winter and spring trying to help
                find an appropriate temporary space for a popular existing Secondary
                Charter School.

                As to the questions I raised at the hearing, I offer no apologies. What
                I was trying to demonstrate was the DOE and Success Academy's egregious
                hypocrisy in applying to open a Charter School for high needs children
                in areas served by "failing schools", when in fact, their real target
                was middle class children (and most importantly, their affluent parents)
                in an area where NONE of the schools can be considered "failing".

                Perhaps I wasn't as clear as I could have been, but your assumption that
                we (or for that matter, our elected officials) were engaging in NIMBY
                politics was WAY off the mark.

                As to Leonie's observation about "choice" in general, that is a topic
                VERY worthy of a serious conversation. Personally, I am ambivalent. I
                am aware of the tendencies towards "creaming" and segregation that
                choice often engenders. But I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the work
                of Deborah Meier and the "small schools movement" either.

                If that leaves you "extremely offended", so be it. The real world is
                complicated.
                ____________
                Jim Devor President, CEC-15 follow me on
                Twitter @JimDevor

                L

                --- In nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com, Karen Sprowal
                <katherine_sprowal_cucs@...> wrote:
                >
                > Absolutely!
                > HSA rapid expansion of their chain in Harlem "failing
                schools"Â had virtually no push back from parents. To date-no
                accountability for pushing out IEP/ELL children, it's for sure a
                much broader DOE plan. Most of these schools are now faced with a
                concentrated flow of these children with continued depletion ofÂ
                resources, it criminal!  I hope most of us agree they
                shouldn't be in any public schools, anywhere. The last thing we need
                among us is any kind of "ism divide."
                > Thanks Leonie, Lisa and others for your feedback on this!Â
                > Â
                > Â
                > Â Â On Wed, 11/30/11, Leonie Haimson leonie@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > From: Leonie Haimson leonie@...
                > Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
                charter hearing
                > To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 11:43 PM
                >
                >
                > Â
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > There is no doubt that charter schools undermine nearby public schools
                by enrolling the most likely to succeed kids, and leaving the pub
                schools with a higher concentration of the at â•"risk kids in worse
                conditions, w/ fewer resources and less space. This is pretty much
                true of all ╲choice╡ schools as well.
                > Â
                > Itâ•˙s a divide and conquer mentality.
                > Â
                > Leonie Haimson
                > Executive Director
                > Class Size Matters
                > 124 Waverly Pl.
                > New York, NY 10011
                > 212-674-7320
                > leonie@...
                > www.classsizematters.org
                > http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com
                > http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson
                > Â
                > Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson
                > Â
                > Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!
                > Â
                > Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing
                classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing
                nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > Â
                >
                > From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LRN1212@...
                > Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 11:36 PM
                > To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
                charter hearing
                > Â
                > I certainly agree with Karen on this...as a teacher inÂ
                District 13, it was quite frustrating to hear many people
                (especially politicians) saying that people are NOT against charter
                schools, but they should not be in their well-off
                neighborhoods...instead they should stay in the poor neighborhoods where
                the schools are "failing". Â I went up to Brad Lander and tried to
                have this conversation with him. Â I said that one of the main
                reasons schools in poorer neighborhoods are struggling is because we do
                not have the resources to provide the kind of education any of our
                students need .  We are lucky to raise $1,000.00 a year,
                unlike many schools in more middle class neighborhoods. Â How about
                giving the PUBLIC Schools what we need  instead of sending in
                charter schools to "skim" off many of the more involved parents. Â
                Lisa N.
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Karen Sprowal katherine_sprowal_cucs@...
                > To: nyceducationnews nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Wed, Nov 30, 2011 9:04 am
                > Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: news roundup of last night's
                charter hearing
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Just saw Professor Noguera on CNN complaining about
                more police than social workers
                >
                > in NYC schools and the disparity of arrest for children of
                color.
                >
                > Â
                >
                > Gotta tell you, I was extremely offended by the CECs argument/position
                >
                > of not needing Success charter in their "affluent district" being
                better served in
                >
                > "non-white" areas of Brooklyn. I do understand they are answering HSA
                claims
                >
                > to fill the gaps in providing quality school choices to "high
                needs areas."
                >
                > However, do we want her corporate business model, depleting pulic
                schools
                >
                > resources in ANY of our schools?
                >
                > It's good for us Black & Latino parents in Harlem, Sunset Park,
                etc., but them?
                >
                > Â
                >
                > Kudos to you Brian for your passionate 2 Min's summary of how
                all
                >
                > of this Stinks for everyone!
                >
                > Do anyone know the name of the CECs chair or have his
                contact info?Â
                >
                > Â
                >
                > Karen SprowalÂ
                >
                > Â
                >
                > Â
                >


              • Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.