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FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

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  • Leonie Haimson
    Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC. On the Brookings
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011

      Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

      On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

      School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

      by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

      The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

      The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

      New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

      The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

      The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

      To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

       

       

      Leonie Haimson

      Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

      New York, NY 10011

      212-674-7320

      leonieh@...

      www.parentsacrossamerica.org

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

       

      Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

       

      Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

       

      Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

       

       

       

       

    • Noah Gotbaum
      Sam Dillon s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process. Also, no mention that while some have many good
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011

         

        Sam Dillon’s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process.  Also, no mention that while some have many good choices, the vast majority have very few and those we do have are being starved of resources. 

         

        If Brookings would actually ask what parents want - rather than accepting the corporate wish list of “choice” and competition - they would find the same thing that Eva Moskowitz’s own polls show:  the overwhelming majority of public school parents, including those in NYC, aren’t asking for more choices and many new options.  Rather, we want more resources and investments in the public school options we already have.

         

        http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/nyregion/brookings-report-grades-new-yorks-school-choice-system-best-in-country.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion

         

        National Report Praises School-Choice System for New York City Students

        By SAM DILLON
        Published: November 29, 2011

        New York has the most effective school-choice system of any of the nation’s largest school districts, allowing students and parents the most freedom and providing them with the most relevant information on educational performance, according to a new Brookings Institution report scheduled for publication online Wednesday.

        But even New York got a B under the report’s A-to-F grading system, with Brookings saying the city provided the least useful online information for comparing schools and giving it low scores in several other categories.

        The Chicago public school district, which has the nation’s third-largest student population, after New York and Los Angeles, ranked second in choice, with a B. Los Angeles was 21st, with a C, and the Orange County district in Florida, which includes Orlando, came in last, with the report’s lone D.

        Brookings, which has advocated expanded choices for students, rated districts in 13 categories, including availability of charter, magnet and affordable private schools; policies on virtual education; and “restructuring or closing unpopular schools.” Grover Whitehurst, a senior fellow at Brookings who developed the index, said districts were allowed to “put their best foot forward” and be judged on a particular aspect of their system — in New York, for example, officials showcased the process for assigning students to high schools.

        New York’s eighth graders fill out high school applications ranking as many as 12 choices, and the high schools, in turn, rank applicants based on their portfolios, test scores, geographic proximity and other factors. A computer then matches students to high schools. This year 48 percent of all students were assigned to their first-choice high school.

        There is less choice for middle schools and, especially, elementary schools, as most New York City students attend schools in whichever of the city’s 32 community districts they live.

        That system is how students are assigned to schools in most of the nation’s 15,000 school districts, said Dr. Whitehurst, who is a proponent of more choice.

        “The typical pattern across the country is residential assignment,” he said. “To the degree that there is choice within the public schools, it’s mostly limited to a few magnet schools.”

        The Brookings report, called the Education Choice and Competition Index, awarded no A’s or F’s: the nation’s 25 largest districts earned 6 B’s, 18 C’s and 1 D. “Nobody was close to perfection,” Dr. Whitehurst explained, “and no district was terrible in everything.”

        In Orange County in Florida, for instance, students have better virtual-school options than do New Yorkers, and the district’s Web site is easier to understand and navigate than New York’s, the report said. But Brookings said the district did not provide students and parents with much actual choice because most students are zoned to attend a school near their residence.

        A spokeswoman for the district disagreed, noting that Orange County has several magnet schools and 30 charter schools and that it provides some students free busing to attend them.

        “Holy mackerel, that’s so inaccurate,” the spokeswoman, Katherine P. Marsh, said of the report, noting that 26,000 of the district’s 179,000 students last year chose to attend a school other than the one for which they were zoned.

         

         

        From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:22 PM
        To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

         

         

        Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

        On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

        School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

        by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

        The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

        The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

        New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

        The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

        The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

        To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

         

         

        Leonie Haimson

        Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

        New York, NY 10011

        212-674-7320

        leonieh@...

        www.parentsacrossamerica.org

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

         

        Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

         

        Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

         

        Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

         

         

         

         

      • Leonie Haimson
        I suggest that Noah and everyone else w/ concerns about this piece email Sam directly at Dillon@nytimes.com You can be sure I have. Thanks, Leonie Haimson
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011

          I suggest that Noah and everyone else w/ concerns about this piece email Sam directly at Dillon@...

           

          You can be sure I have.

          Thanks,

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Executive Director

          Class Size Matters

          124 Waverly Pl.

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonie@...

          www.classsizematters.org

          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

          Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Noah Gotbaum
          Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:38 PM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

           

           

           

          Sam Dillon’s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process.  Also, no mention that while some have many good choices, the vast majority have very few and those we do have are being starved of resources. 

           

          If Brookings would actually ask what parents want - rather than accepting the corporate wish list of “choice” and competition - they would find the same thing that Eva Moskowitz’s own polls show:  the overwhelming majority of public school parents, including those in NYC, aren’t asking for more choices and many new options.  Rather, we want more resources and investments in the public school options we already have.

           

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/nyregion/brookings-report-grades-new-yorks-school-choice-system-best-in-country.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion

           

          National Report Praises School-Choice System for New York City Students

          By SAM DILLON
          Published: November 29, 2011

          New York has the most effective school-choice system of any of the nation’s largest school districts, allowing students and parents the most freedom and providing them with the most relevant information on educational performance, according to a new Brookings Institution report scheduled for publication online Wednesday.

          But even New York got a B under the report’s A-to-F grading system, with Brookings saying the city provided the least useful online information for comparing schools and giving it low scores in several other categories.

          The Chicago public school district, which has the nation’s third-largest student population, after New York and Los Angeles, ranked second in choice, with a B. Los Angeles was 21st, with a C, and the Orange County district in Florida, which includes Orlando, came in last, with the report’s lone D.

          Brookings, which has advocated expanded choices for students, rated districts in 13 categories, including availability of charter, magnet and affordable private schools; policies on virtual education; and “restructuring or closing unpopular schools.” Grover Whitehurst, a senior fellow at Brookings who developed the index, said districts were allowed to “put their best foot forward” and be judged on a particular aspect of their system — in New York, for example, officials showcased the process for assigning students to high schools.

          New York’s eighth graders fill out high school applications ranking as many as 12 choices, and the high schools, in turn, rank applicants based on their portfolios, test scores, geographic proximity and other factors. A computer then matches students to high schools. This year 48 percent of all students were assigned to their first-choice high school.

          There is less choice for middle schools and, especially, elementary schools, as most New York City students attend schools in whichever of the city’s 32 community districts they live.

          That system is how students are assigned to schools in most of the nation’s 15,000 school districts, said Dr. Whitehurst, who is a proponent of more choice.

          “The typical pattern across the country is residential assignment,” he said. “To the degree that there is choice within the public schools, it’s mostly limited to a few magnet schools.”

          The Brookings report, called the Education Choice and Competition Index, awarded no A’s or F’s: the nation’s 25 largest districts earned 6 B’s, 18 C’s and 1 D. “Nobody was close to perfection,” Dr. Whitehurst explained, “and no district was terrible in everything.”

          In Orange County in Florida, for instance, students have better virtual-school options than do New Yorkers, and the district’s Web site is easier to understand and navigate than New York’s, the report said. But Brookings said the district did not provide students and parents with much actual choice because most students are zoned to attend a school near their residence.

          A spokeswoman for the district disagreed, noting that Orange County has several magnet schools and 30 charter schools and that it provides some students free busing to attend them.

          “Holy mackerel, that’s so inaccurate,” the spokeswoman, Katherine P. Marsh, said of the report, noting that 26,000 of the district’s 179,000 students last year chose to attend a school other than the one for which they were zoned.

           

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
          Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:22 PM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

           

           

          Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

          On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

          School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

          by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

          The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

          The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

          New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

          The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

          The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

          To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

           

           

          Leonie Haimson

          Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

          New York, NY 10011

          212-674-7320

          leonieh@...

          www.parentsacrossamerica.org

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

           

          Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

           

          Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

           

          Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

           

           

           

           

        • Diane Ravitch
          The author of this study asked me if there is any survey data or studies showing parent discontent with the city s choice policies. If you know of any, please
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011
            The author of this study asked me if there is any survey data or studies showing parent discontent with the city's choice policies. If you know of any, please let him know.


            On Nov 30, 2011, at 6:47 PM, "Leonie Haimson" <leonie@...> wrote:

             

            I suggest that Noah and everyone else w/ concerns about this piece email Sam directly at Dillon@...

             

            You can be sure I have.

            Thanks,

             

            Leonie Haimson

            Executive Director

            Class Size Matters

            124 Waverly Pl.

            New York, NY 10011

            212-674-7320

            leonie@...

            www.classsizematters.org

            http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

             

            Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

             

            Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

             

            Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

             

            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Noah Gotbaum
            Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:38 PM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

             

             

             

            Sam Dillon’s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process.  Also, no mention that while some have many good choices, the vast majority have very few and those we do have are being starved of resources. 

             

            If Brookings would actually ask what parents want - rather than accepting the corporate wish list of “choice” and competition - they would find the same thing that Eva Moskowitz’s own polls show:  the overwhelming majority of public school parents, including those in NYC, aren’t asking for more choices and many new options.  Rather, we want more resources and investments in the public school options we already have.

             

            http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/nyregion/brookings-report-grades-new-yorks-school-choice-system-best-in-country.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion

             

            National Report Praises School-Choice System for New York City Students

            By SAM DILLON
            Published: November 29, 2011

            New York has the most effective school-choice system of any of the nation’s largest school districts, allowing students and parents the most freedom and providing them with the most relevant information on educational performance, according to a new Brookings Institution report scheduled for publication online Wednesday.

            But even New York got a B under the report’s A-to-F grading system, with Brookings saying the city provided the least useful online information for comparing schools and giving it low scores in several other categories.

            The Chicago public school district, which has the nation’s third-largest student population, after New York and Los Angeles, ranked second in choice, with a B. Los Angeles was 21st, with a C, and the Orange County district in Florida, which includes Orlando, came in last, with the report’s lone D.

            Brookings, which has advocated expanded choices for students, rated districts in 13 categories, including availability of charter, magnet and affordable private schools; policies on virtual education; and “restructuring or closing unpopular schools.” Grover Whitehurst, a senior fellow at Brookings who developed the index, said districts were allowed to “put their best foot forward” and be judged on a particular aspect of their system — in New York, for example, officials showcased the process for assigning students to high schools.

            New York’s eighth graders fill out high school applications ranking as many as 12 choices, and the high schools, in turn, rank applicants based on their portfolios, test scores, geographic proximity and other factors. A computer then matches students to high schools. This year 48 percent of all students were assigned to their first-choice high school.

            There is less choice for middle schools and, especially, elementary schools, as most New York City students attend schools in whichever of the city’s 32 community districts they live.

            That system is how students are assigned to schools in most of the nation’s 15,000 school districts, said Dr. Whitehurst, who is a proponent of more choice.

            “The typical pattern across the country is residential assignment,” he said. “To the degree that there is choice within the public schools, it’s mostly limited to a few magnet schools.”

            The Brookings report, called the Education Choice and Competition Index, awarded no A’s or F’s: the nation’s 25 largest districts earned 6 B’s, 18 C’s and 1 D. “Nobody was close to perfection,” Dr. Whitehurst explained, “and no district was terrible in everything.”

            In Orange County in Florida, for instance, students have better virtual-school options than do New Yorkers, and the district’s Web site is easier to understand and navigate than New York’s, the report said. But Brookings said the district did not provide students and parents with much actual choice because most students are zoned to attend a school near their residence.

            A spokeswoman for the district disagreed, noting that Orange County has several magnet schools and 30 charter schools and that it provides some students free busing to attend them.

            “Holy mackerel, that’s so inaccurate,” the spokeswoman, Katherine P. Marsh, said of the report, noting that 26,000 of the district’s 179,000 students last year chose to attend a school other than the one for which they were zoned.

             

             

            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
            Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:22 PM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

             

             

            Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

            On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

            School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

            by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

            The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

            The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

            New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

            The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

            The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

            To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

             

             

            Leonie Haimson

            Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

            New York, NY 10011

            212-674-7320

            leonieh@...

            www.parentsacrossamerica.org

            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

             

            Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

             

            Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

             

            Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

             

             

             

             

          • Leonie Haimson
            I don’t know of any surveys; that would indeed be a good idea, but don’t hold your breath for DOE to do it. It might wreck their image. But most parents
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011

              I don’t know of any surveys; that would indeed be a good idea, but don’t hold your breath for DOE to do it.  It might wreck their image.

               

              But most parents who go through this come away overwhelmed by the process.  It took my husband and me 5 hours one Sunday just to devise a matrix w/ school tour dates, test dates, portfolios and other requirements for the schools we might apply to.  And we are both college grads; and he is a Phd.  I cannot imagine what it is like for single parents, or recent immigrants.

               

              I suggest some readings:

               

              http://insideschools.org/blog/item/1000160-high-school-hustle-lets-simplify-admissions

              After two New York City public high school searches in as many years, I've had lots of ideas about what might make the process a little easier on overtaxed parents: virtual tours, excuse letters for employers, more clear and transparent information from the schools.

              I've recounted tales of falling asleep on tours, frustration and fear over tryouts, and concerns about preparing for the SHSAT exams that determine entrance into specialized high schools. I sought out advice from parents, and got an earful about similar frustrations.

              I wondered whether anything had improved since my search last fall. When I read a father's plea in the New York Daily News for popular city high schools to do a better job accommodating parents, and his description of enormous lines and long waits for limited open houses, I realized it had not…. A second friend has been particularly frustrated by schools that don't respond to voice messages or email. She's been further put off by schools that let you know via their website that their tours have been ''sold out.''

              ''It's a level of arrogance I'd expect from a private school, not those funded by taxpayer dollars,'' she points out. ''I think some of these schools forget they are responsible to the public, not rich parents. If they don't have the staff to respond, pull in more. ''

              http://gothamschools.org/2011/04/20/study-looks-at-what-influences-students-high-school-choices/

              A doctoral candidate at New York University, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj said that at one of the middle schools she’s spent time in, where many students come from low-income, immigrant families, guidance counselors filled out high school admission rankings for about 20 students without the students’ input.

              http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/09/30/high-school-admissions-choice-but-no-equity/

              the Department of Education disseminates information in ways that are not accessible to all families in New York. This raises serious questions about whether choice and equity can actually be reached in the nation’s largest school system.

              http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/11/18/families-that-most-need-help-of-guidance-counselors-often-dont-get-it/

              But because middle schools are not required by the district to provide information or guidance about the choice policy, many families who need the most help are left virtually alone to make consequential choice decisions.

              .

              New Schools study, The New Marketplace, which shows how ridiculously complex the process is, including this chart:

              Also featured here: http://gothamschools.org/2009/06/23/one-challenge-for-city-high-schools-the-process-to-get-in/

              http://gothamschools.org/2011/11/10/in-portfolio-of-schools-a-struggle-to-be-neighborhoods-choice/ 

              Schools having to hire publicists to market themselves, with scarce resources; (esp. to compete w/ charters, some of which spend over $1000 per student for marketing/recruitment

              http://articles.nydailynews.com/2011-07-27/local/29836796_1_success-charter-network-charter-schools-icahn-charter )

              http://articles.nydailynews.com/2011-03-31/local/29386428_1_high-schools-charter-schools-graduation-rates

              Over 8,000 New York eighth-graders rejected from high school choices, forced to apply again…"I just don't know what we're paying our taxes for -- to have our children humiliated?" said one Manhattan mother…

              http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/10/26/you-call-this-choice/

              Last year the top eight students in my school were matched with no school at all, and were left to reapply in the second round. This included the valedictorian and other students with great averages and no history of discipline problems. The schools still available in the second round were limited, and these top students felt that they had been cheated while somehow others who were known to be less motivated ended up in coveted schools.

              http://gradworks.umi.com/34/54/3454475.html

               

              Findings from this study show that the major stakeholders in this process--the parent, the students, and the high schools--behave in distinct, complex, and somewhat unpredictable ways within the market. These behaviors do not necessarily reflect the intent of the city's policy, nor do they reflect Friedman's idealized market upon which these reforms were based. Data from this case study highlight an imbalance in the market between the consumer and the producers, with the schools wielding more knowledge about the system, and having developed mechanisms to manage the process. The findings raise questions not only about New York City's system of public high school choice, but the philosophical underpinnings of markets in education overall.

               

              http://soe.sagepub.com/content/83/3/227.abstract

               

               

              Drawing on a year and a half of ethnographic research in three New York City small high schools, this study examines the role of the school in managing school choice and asks what social processes are associated with principals’ disparate approaches. Although district policy did not allow principals to select students based on their performance, two of the three schools in this study circumvented these rules to recruit and retain a population that would meet local accountability targets.

               

              And then to add insult to injury…

               

              http://gothamschools.org/2009/03/16/for-high-school-students-school-choice-is-hard-to-come-by/

              I heard from countless parents, students, and advocates desperately seeking school transfers when I worked at Insideschools, through the hotline run by parent organization Advocates for Children. Callers reported that their transfer requests, particularly at the high school level, had been denied even though they had compelling reasons for seeking them. Those calls continue to pour in, my former colleague Pamela Wheaton, Insideschools’ executive director, told me today.

              “For whatever reason, it has become increasingly difficult, almost impossible, to get a transfer to another regular high school,” Wheaton said.

               

               

               

               

              Leonie Haimson

              Executive Director

              Class Size Matters

              124 Waverly Pl.

              New York, NY 10011

              212-674-7320

              leonie@...

              www.classsizematters.org

              http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

              http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

               

              Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

               

              Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

               

              Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

               

              From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Diane Ravitch
              Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7:12 PM
              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: Grover J. Whitehurst
              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

               

               

              The author of this study asked me if there is any survey data or studies showing parent discontent with the city's choice policies. If you know of any, please let him know.

               


              On Nov 30, 2011, at 6:47 PM, "Leonie Haimson" <leonie@...> wrote:

               

              I suggest that Noah and everyone else w/ concerns about this piece email Sam directly at Dillon@...

               

              You can be sure I have.

              Thanks,

               

              Leonie Haimson

              Executive Director

              Class Size Matters

              124 Waverly Pl.

              New York, NY 10011

              212-674-7320

              leonie@...

              www.classsizematters.org

              http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

              http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

               

              Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

               

              Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

               

              Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

               

              From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Noah Gotbaum
              Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:38 PM
              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

               

               

               

              Sam Dillon’s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process.  Also, no mention that while some have many good choices, the vast majority have very few and those we do have are being starved of resources. 

               

              If Brookings would actually ask what parents want - rather than accepting the corporate wish list of “choice” and competition - they would find the same thing that Eva Moskowitz’s own polls show:  the overwhelming majority of public school parents, including those in NYC, aren’t asking for more choices and many new options.  Rather, we want more resources and investments in the public school options we already have.

               

              http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/nyregion/brookings-report-grades-new-yorks-school-choice-system-best-in-country.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion

               

              National Report Praises School-Choice System for New York City Students

              By SAM DILLON
              Published: November 29, 2011

              New York has the most effective school-choice system of any of the nation’s largest school districts, allowing students and parents the most freedom and providing them with the most relevant information on educational performance, according to a new Brookings Institution report scheduled for publication online Wednesday.

              But even New York got a B under the report’s A-to-F grading system, with Brookings saying the city provided the least useful online information for comparing schools and giving it low scores in several other categories.

              The Chicago public school district, which has the nation’s third-largest student population, after New York and Los Angeles, ranked second in choice, with a B. Los Angeles was 21st, with a C, and the Orange County district in Florida, which includes Orlando, came in last, with the report’s lone D.

              Brookings, which has advocated expanded choices for students, rated districts in 13 categories, including availability of charter, magnet and affordable private schools; policies on virtual education; and “restructuring or closing unpopular schools.” Grover Whitehurst, a senior fellow at Brookings who developed the index, said districts were allowed to “put their best foot forward” and be judged on a particular aspect of their system — in New York, for example, officials showcased the process for assigning students to high schools.

              New York’s eighth graders fill out high school applications ranking as many as 12 choices, and the high schools, in turn, rank applicants based on their portfolios, test scores, geographic proximity and other factors. A computer then matches students to high schools. This year 48 percent of all students were assigned to their first-choice high school.

              There is less choice for middle schools and, especially, elementary schools, as most New York City students attend schools in whichever of the city’s 32 community districts they live.

              That system is how students are assigned to schools in most of the nation’s 15,000 school districts, said Dr. Whitehurst, who is a proponent of more choice.

              “The typical pattern across the country is residential assignment,” he said. “To the degree that there is choice within the public schools, it’s mostly limited to a few magnet schools.”

              The Brookings report, called the Education Choice and Competition Index, awarded no A’s or F’s: the nation’s 25 largest districts earned 6 B’s, 18 C’s and 1 D. “Nobody was close to perfection,” Dr. Whitehurst explained, “and no district was terrible in everything.”

              In Orange County in Florida, for instance, students have better virtual-school options than do New Yorkers, and the district’s Web site is easier to understand and navigate than New York’s, the report said. But Brookings said the district did not provide students and parents with much actual choice because most students are zoned to attend a school near their residence.

              A spokeswoman for the district disagreed, noting that Orange County has several magnet schools and 30 charter schools and that it provides some students free busing to attend them.

              “Holy mackerel, that’s so inaccurate,” the spokeswoman, Katherine P. Marsh, said of the report, noting that 26,000 of the district’s 179,000 students last year chose to attend a school other than the one for which they were zoned.

               

               

              From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
              Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:22 PM
              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

               

               

              Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

              On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

              School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

              by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

              The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

              The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

              New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

              The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

              The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

              To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

               

               

              Leonie Haimson

              Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

              New York, NY 10011

              212-674-7320

              leonieh@...

              www.parentsacrossamerica.org

              http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

               

              Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

               

              Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

               

              Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

               

               

               

               

            • Jan Carr
              Here s another bit of anecdotal evidence of how stressful the admissions process is. I have one child. He s a junior in h.s., so we did tours/tests/
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 30, 2011
                Here's another bit of anecdotal evidence of how stressful the admissions process is.

                I have one child.  He's a junior in h.s., so we did tours/tests/admissions for middle school (D2) and again for high school, but that's already a few years back.

                Safely in the past, you say?

                The other night I had AN ACTUAL NIGHTMARE that someone was giving me a two-year-old to raise.  In my dream, I freaked out.  I started screaming, "No!  I can't do it!  I can't go through THE SCHOOL ADMISSIONS PROCESS all over again!"

                Funny but true.

                Jan


                On Nov 30, 2011, at 9:11 PM, Leonie Haimson wrote:

                 

                I don’t know of any surveys; that would indeed be a good idea, but don’t hold your breath for DOE to do it.  It might wreck their image.

                 

                But most parents who go through this come away overwhelmed by the process.  It took my husband and me 5 hours one Sunday just to devise a matrix w/ school tour dates, test dates, portfolios and other requirements for the schools we might apply to.  And we are both college grads; and he is a Phd.  I cannot imagine what it is like for single parents, or recent immigrants.

                 

                I suggest some readings:

                 

                http://insideschools.org/blog/item/1000160-high-school-hustle-lets-simplify-admissions

                After two New York City public high school searches in as many years, I've had lots of ideas about what might make the process a little easier on overtaxed parents: virtual tours, excuse letters for employers, more clear and transparent information from the schools.

                I've recounted tales of falling asleep on tours, frustration and fear over tryouts, and concerns about preparing for the SHSAT exams that determine entrance into specialized high schools. I sought out advice from parents, and got an earful about similar frustrations.

                I wondered whether anything had improved since my search last fall. When I read a father's plea in the New York Daily News for popular city high schools to do a better job accommodating parents, and his description of enormous lines and long waits for limited open houses, I realized it had not…. A second friend has been particularly frustrated by schools that don't respond to voice messages or email. She's been further put off by schools that let you know via their website that their tours have been ''sold out.''

                ''It's a level of arrogance I'd expect from a private school, not those funded by taxpayer dollars,'' she points out. ''I think some of these schools forget they are responsible to the public, not rich parents. If they don't have the staff to respond, pull in more. ''

                http://gothamschools.org/2011/04/20/study-looks-at-what-influences-students-high-school-choices/

                A doctoral candidate at New York University, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj said that at one of the middle schools she’s spent time in, where many students come from low-income, immigrant families, guidance counselors filled out high school admission rankings for about 20 students without the students’ input.

                http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/09/30/high-school-admissions-choice-but-no-equity/

                the Department of Education disseminates information in ways that are not accessible to all families in New York. This raises serious questions about whether choice and equity can actually be reached in the nation’s largest school system.

                http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/11/18/families-that-most-need-help-of-guidance-counselors-often-dont-get-it/

                But because middle schools are not required by the district to provide information or guidance about the choice policy, many families who need the most help are left virtually alone to make consequential choice decisions.

                .

                New Schools study, The New Marketplace, which shows how ridiculously complex the process is, including this chart:

                <image001.png>

                Also featured here: http://gothamschools.org/2009/06/23/one-challenge-for-city-high-schools-the-process-to-get-in/

                http://gothamschools.org/2011/11/10/in-portfolio-of-schools-a-struggle-to-be-neighborhoods-choice/ 

                Schools having to hire publicists to market themselves, with scarce resources; (esp. to compete w/ charters, some of which spend over $1000 per student for marketing/recruitment

                http://articles.nydailynews.com/2011-07-27/local/29836796_1_success-charter-network-charter-schools-icahn-charter )

                http://articles.nydailynews.com/2011-03-31/local/29386428_1_high-schools-charter-schools-graduation-rates

                Over 8,000 New York eighth-graders rejected from high school choices, forced to apply again…"I just don't know what we're paying our taxes for -- to have our children humiliated?" said one Manhattan mother…

                http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2011/10/26/you-call-this-choice/

                Last year the top eight students in my school were matched with no school at all, and were left to reapply in the second round. This included the valedictorian and other students with great averages and no history of discipline problems. The schools still available in the second round were limited, and these top students felt that they had been cheated while somehow others who were known to be less motivated ended up in coveted schools.

                http://gradworks.umi.com/34/54/3454475.html

                 

                Findings from this study show that the major stakeholders in this process--the parent, the students, and the high schools--behave in distinct, complex, and somewhat unpredictable ways within the market. These behaviors do not necessarily reflect the intent of the city's policy, nor do they reflect Friedman's idealized market upon which these reforms were based. Data from this case study highlight an imbalance in the market between the consumer and the producers, with the schools wielding more knowledge about the system, and having developed mechanisms to manage the process. The findings raise questions not only about New York City's system of public high school choice, but the philosophical underpinnings of markets in education overall.

                 

                http://soe.sagepub.com/content/83/3/227.abstract

                 

                 

                Drawing on a year and a half of ethnographic research in three New York City small high schools, this study examines the role of the school in managing school choice and asks what social processes are associated with principals’ disparate approaches. Although district policy did not allow principals to select students based on their performance, two of the three schools in this study circumvented these rules to recruit and retain a population that would meet local accountability targets.

                 

                And then to add insult to injury…

                 

                http://gothamschools.org/2009/03/16/for-high-school-students-school-choice-is-hard-to-come-by/

                I heard from countless parents, students, and advocates desperately seeking school transfers when I worked at Insideschools, through the hotline run by parent organization Advocates for Children. Callers reported that their transfer requests, particularly at the high school level, had been denied even though they had compelling reasons for seeking them. Those calls continue to pour in, my former colleague Pamela Wheaton, Insideschools’ executive director, told me today.

                “For whatever reason, it has become increasingly difficult, almost impossible, to get a transfer to another regular high school,” Wheaton said.

                 

                 

                 

                 

                Leonie Haimson

                Executive Director

                Class Size Matters

                124 Waverly Pl.

                New York, NY 10011

                212-674-7320

                leonie@...

                www.classsizematters.org

                http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

                http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

                 

                Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

                 

                Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                 

                Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                 

                From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Diane Ravitch
                Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7:12 PM
                To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: Grover J. Whitehurst
                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

                 

                 

                The author of this study asked me if there is any survey data or studies showing parent discontent with the city's choice policies. If you know of any, please let him know.

                 


                On Nov 30, 2011, at 6:47 PM, "Leonie Haimson" <leonie@...> wrote:

                 

                I suggest that Noah and everyone else w/ concerns about this piece email Sam directly at Dillon@...

                 

                You can be sure I have.

                Thanks,

                 

                Leonie Haimson

                Executive Director

                Class Size Matters

                124 Waverly Pl.

                New York, NY 10011

                212-674-7320

                leonie@...

                www.classsizematters.org

                http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com

                http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

                 

                Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

                 

                Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                 

                Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Subscribe to NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                 

                From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Noah Gotbaum
                Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:38 PM
                To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

                 

                 

                 

                Sam Dillon’s article in the Times much less skeptical, with no knowledge of the mess that is the process.  Also, no mention that while some have many good choices, the vast majority have very few and those we do have are being starved of resources. 

                 

                If Brookings would actually ask what parents want - rather than accepting the corporate wish list of “choice” and competition - they would find the same thing that Eva Moskowitz’s own polls show:  the overwhelming majority of public school parents, including those in NYC, aren’t asking for more choices and many new options.  Rather, we want more resources and investments in the public school options we already have.

                 

                http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/nyregion/brookings-report-grades-new-yorks-school-choice-system-best-in-country.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion

                 

                National Report Praises School-Choice System for New York City Students

                By SAM DILLON
                Published: November 29, 2011

                New York has the most effective school-choice system of any of the nation’s largest school districts, allowing students and parents the most freedom and providing them with the most relevant information on educational performance, according to a new Brookings Institution report scheduled for publication online Wednesday.

                But even New York got a B under the report’s A-to-F grading system, with Brookings saying the city provided the least useful online information for comparing schools and giving it low scores in several other categories.

                The Chicago public school district, which has the nation’s third-largest student population, after New York and Los Angeles, ranked second in choice, with a B. Los Angeles was 21st, with a C, and the Orange County district in Florida, which includes Orlando, came in last, with the report’s lone D.

                Brookings, which has advocated expanded choices for students, rated districts in 13 categories, including availability of charter, magnet and affordable private schools; policies on virtual education; and “restructuring or closing unpopular schools.” Grover Whitehurst, a senior fellow at Brookings who developed the index, said districts were allowed to “put their best foot forward” and be judged on a particular aspect of their system — in New York, for example, officials showcased the process for assigning students to high schools.

                New York’s eighth graders fill out high school applications ranking as many as 12 choices, and the high schools, in turn, rank applicants based on their portfolios, test scores, geographic proximity and other factors. A computer then matches students to high schools. This year 48 percent of all students were assigned to their first-choice high school.

                There is less choice for middle schools and, especially, elementary schools, as most New York City students attend schools in whichever of the city’s 32 community districts they live.

                That system is how students are assigned to schools in most of the nation’s 15,000 school districts, said Dr. Whitehurst, who is a proponent of more choice.

                “The typical pattern across the country is residential assignment,” he said. “To the degree that there is choice within the public schools, it’s mostly limited to a few magnet schools.”

                The Brookings report, called the Education Choice and Competition Index, awarded no A’s or F’s: the nation’s 25 largest districts earned 6 B’s, 18 C’s and 1 D. “Nobody was close to perfection,” Dr. Whitehurst explained, “and no district was terrible in everything.”

                In Orange County in Florida, for instance, students have better virtual-school options than do New Yorkers, and the district’s Web site is easier to understand and navigate than New York’s, the report said. But Brookings said the district did not provide students and parents with much actual choice because most students are zoned to attend a school near their residence.

                A spokeswoman for the district disagreed, noting that Orange County has several magnet schools and 30 charter schools and that it provides some students free busing to attend them.

                “Holy mackerel, that’s so inaccurate,” the spokeswoman, Katherine P. Marsh, said of the report, noting that 26,000 of the district’s 179,000 students last year chose to attend a school other than the one for which they were zoned.

                 

                 

                From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
                Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:22 PM
                To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [nyceducationnews] FW: School choice advocates rank city's enrollment policies as best

                 

                 

                Lots of caveats below by the reporter, who clearly knows how hugely fallible and detested by parents the choice process has become in NYC.

                On  the Brookings page there is a podcast of Joel Klein speaking at Brookings today, where I’m sure he was be roundly appreciated and applauded by all those who see “choice” and competition as the panacea for our struggling public schools.

                School choice advocates rank city’s enrollment policies as best

                by Philissa Cramer, at 11:42 am

                The same admissions processes that leave city parents scratching their heads or, worse, pulling their hair out have put New York City at the head of the pack in a new study ranking districts’ school choice policies.

                The report, by the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, which has long pushed for expanded school choice, compares choice policies in place in 25 urban school districts and how families took advantage of them.

                New York City came in first, in part because students here are never assigned to schools based simply on where they live. Of the 25 districts, New York was the only one where students are assigned to schools based on applications that asked for families’ preferences, not just their address.

                The city has a labyrinthine citywide high school matching process and district-based middle and elementary school admissions processes that many believe could be improved. In a district with more than 1,600 schools (the Brookings report tallies 1,474), the processes are seen as bringing order but also as sometimes pitting schools against each other and limiting options, particularly in high school, for students who aren’t happy with what they’ve chosen.

                The Brookings report also gave New York credit for making data about school performance public and closing or restructuring low-performing schools. But its B grade would have been higher if it had more virtual school options and provided transportation when students enroll in schools outside their districts.

                To tie in with the report, former city schools chancellor Joel Klein, who bolstered and expanded the city’s school choice policies, is speaking at Brookings’ Washington, D.C., offices today. Klein frequently said, as in an interview below with the libertarian news group Reason, that he wanted to give poor families the kind of school choice that middle-class families have long exercised.

                 

                 

                Leonie Haimson

                Parents Across America/Class Size Matters

                New York, NY 10011

                212-674-7320

                leonieh@...

                www.parentsacrossamerica.org

                http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leonie-haimson

                 

                Follow me on twitter @leoniehaimson

                 

                Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters and Parents Across America now!

                 

                Subscribe to Parents Across America news by sending an email to PAAnews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                 

                 

                 

                 



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