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Re: [nyceducationnews] Cuomo Aims to Cap School Bosses Pay - What about Charters Bosses?

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  • Mona Davids (NYCPA)
    Not gonna happen. They re all CEO s of the Charter Management Organizations (CMO s), a separate additional non-profit consultancy, that provides the back
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 28 10:48 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Not gonna happen. They're all CEO's of the Charter Management
      Organizations (CMO's), a separate additional non-profit consultancy, that
      provides the back office and consulting services to the school.

      So, like the budget cuts and teacher layoffs, the superintendent salary
      caps DO NOT affect charters. Charters are rolling in the dough... and
      still demanding more money.

      > Wonder if given the budget crunch the Governor and legislature will hold
      the
      > charter school heads equally "accountable" and go after Deborah Kenny's
      $560k per year Harlem Village Academy salary, Geoff Canada's $500k+ or
      Eva
      > Moskowitz's almost $400k annual comp? Especially if, as they and the press
      > never fail to claim, "charters schools are public schools." (See Leo
      Casey's excellent EdWise piece of a few weeks ago on this -
      > http://www.edwize.org/will-governor-cuomo-take-on-outrageous-charter-superin
      tendent-pay-too)
      > Shouldn't these private/non-profit entrepreneurs overseeing millions in
      public funds and being paid by taxpayer dollars, be accountable and
      transparent to others besides themselves and their handpicked boards?
      http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay-
      1034245.php
      > School chiefs' pay at issue
      > Cuomo proposes cap on superintendent salaries; plan derided as a
      political
      > ploy
      > By Scott Waldman Staff Writer
      > Updated 11:45 p.m., Monday, February 28, 2011
      > http://csc.beap.ad.yieldmanager.net/i?bv=1.0.0&bs=(1242kcncb(gid$42201174-43
      c0-11e0-b5e8-8300c2e43ac8,st$1298955384328796,v$1.0))&t=blank&al=(as$11rc6a6
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      > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay
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      -1034245.php>
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      of 1
      > ALBANY -- Gov. Andrew Cuomo
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Andrew+Cuomo%22> wants to cap the
      six-figure salaries of the state's school superintendents.
      > Cuomo said he will propose legislation this week to limit superintendent
      salaries based on student enrollment. His bill would allow salaries up
      to
      > $125,000 for the smallest rural districts and up to $175,000 for the
      largest
      > districts, often in affluent suburbs.
      > Cuomo singled out school administrator salaries in his State of the
      State
      > speech in February and joked that he would like to earn that much. He
      called
      > on school leaders complaining about his budget cuts to look at their own
      paychecks and make sacrifices there first.
      > While the salary cap may be politically popular, it will save only about
      $15
      > million, said Robert Lowry
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Robert+Lowry%22> , spokesman for the
      New
      > York State Council of School
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22New+York+State+Council+of+School%22>
      Superintendents. It ignores the reality that the governor's cuts are
      taking
      > $1.5 billion from schools, he said.
      > Lowry called the proposal "a distraction from the hard choices the
      superintendents, boards and voters have to make."
      > Cuomo's bill would make superintendents subject to the cap once their
      current contracts expire. Currently, 31 percent of superintendents make
      over
      > $179,000. The Syosset superintendent on Long Island is the state's
      highest
      > paid at $386,868. Cuomo's proposal, if passed by the Legislature, could
      force lower salaries for 319 superintendents, nearly half of the top
      district administrators in the state. Voters could override the cap. The
      move has echoes of another salary freeze that Gov. Mario Cuomo
      instituted in 1993, when he reined in the rising salaries of Board of
      Cooperative Educational Services
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Board+of+Cooperative+Educational+Services%2
      2> , or BOCES, superintendents. However, while those salaries are now
      limited to $166,572, that cap has done little to hold the line on costs
      because assistant BOCES superintendents, whose pay is not limited,
      routinely
      > make more than their bosses.
      > Cuomo's plan places political rhetoric ahead of long-term solutions that
      would save taxpayers money, said Oliver Robinson
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Oliver+Robinson%22> , superintendent of
      the
      > Shenendehowa school district. He said mandate relief that gives
      districts
      > more power in bargaining with employee unions would save real money.
      "The larger conversation that needs to be taking place is how do we
      focus
      > on
      > lowering costs for the state and the municipalities," he said.
      > Robinson, who said he works at least 70 hours a week, noted that
      districts
      > used to routinely get 100 applications for vacant superintendent jobs,
      but
      > that number has dropped to about half a dozen. He said a freeze would lower
      > the quality of the applicants for school leadership roles.
      > Last year, the average superintendent salary in New York was $163,000,
      according to the statewide superintendents group. The average nationally
      was
      > $160,000.
      > Cuomo has set aside $250 million in state aid for districts that achieve
      administrative efficiencies. He recently praised the Bethlehem school
      <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Bethlehem+school%22> district where
      administrators agreed to a pay freeze, a move instituted a year ago in
      the
      > Albany schools. Both districts are grappling with budget holes in the
      millions of dollars and plan to lay off dozens of teachers. Based on
      faculty
      > pay, their salary freezes probably saved just a single teaching job.
      Despite the lofty pay, superintendent jobs are increasingly harder to
      fill,
      > the Council of School Superintendents found. In many districts,
      including
      > Albany and Schenectady, interim leaders are now in place. Finding a
      permanent replacement can take years and the average superintendent
      keeps
      > the job for just a few years.
      > "It's already difficult to get people to take the job of schools
      superintendent," Lowry said. "It has become an increasingly difficult
      and
      > thankless job."
      > Reach Scott Waldman
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Scott+Waldman%22> at 454-5080 or by
      e-mail
      > at swaldman@.... The Associated Press
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
      l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22The+Associated+Press%22> contributed
      to
      > this story.
      > Read more:
      > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.
      php#ixzz1FJxBMscW>
      > http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.p
      hp#ixzz1FJxBMscW
    • Norm Scott
      I didn t read Leo Casey s excellent piece. Was there any mention of the UFT co-location charters occupying public schools. Norm Cheers Norm Scott Education
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I didn't read Leo Casey's "excellent" piece. Was there any mention of the UFT co-location charters occupying public schools.
        Norm

        Cheers
        Norm Scott

        Education Notes
        ednotesonline.blogspot.com
        Grassroots Education Movement

        Education Editor, The Wave
        www.rockawave.com

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


        From: "Mona Davids (NYCPA)" <mdavids@...>
        Sender: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 01:48:17 -0500
        To: <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
        ReplyTo: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Cuomo Aims to Cap School Bosses Pay - What about Charters Bosses?

         

        Not gonna happen. They're all CEO's of the Charter Management
        Organizations (CMO's), a separate additional non-profit consultancy, that
        provides the back office and consulting services to the school.

        So, like the budget cuts and teacher layoffs, the superintendent salary
        caps DO NOT affect charters. Charters are rolling in the dough... and
        still demanding more money.

        > Wonder if given the budget crunch the Governor and legislature will hold
        the
        > charter school heads equally "accountable" and go after Deborah Kenny's
        $560k per year Harlem Village Academy salary, Geoff Canada's $500k+ or
        Eva
        > Moskowitz's almost $400k annual comp? Especially if, as they and the press
        > never fail to claim, "charters schools are public schools." (See Leo
        Casey's excellent EdWise piece of a few weeks ago on this -
        > http://www.edwize.org/will-governor-cuomo-take-on-outrageous-charter-superin
        tendent-pay-too)
        > Shouldn't these private/non-profit entrepreneurs overseeing millions in
        public funds and being paid by taxpayer dollars, be accountable and
        transparent to others besides themselves and their handpicked boards?
        http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay-
        1034245.php
        > School chiefs' pay at issue
        > Cuomo proposes cap on superintendent salaries; plan derided as a
        political
        > ploy
        > By Scott Waldman Staff Writer
        > Updated 11:45 p.m., Monday, February 28, 2011
        > http://csc.beap.ad.yieldmanager.net/i?bv=1.0.0&bs=(1242kcncb(gid$42201174-43
        c0-11e0-b5e8-8300c2e43ac8,st$1298955384328796,v$1.0))&t=blank&al=(as$11rc6a6
        7v,aid$IBtv7kwNjZE-,ct$25,at$0)
        > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_size.gifLarger
        > <javascript:hst_chsize('plus')> | Smaller
        > <javascript:hst_chsize('minus')>
        > <javascript:hst_print();>
        > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_print.gifPrintable Version
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay
        -1034245.php>
        > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_mail.gifEmail
        > This
        > Georgia (default)
        > Verdana
        > Times New Roman
        > Arial
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay
        -1034245.php>
        > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_dropdown.gifFont Page 1
        of 1
        > ALBANY -- Gov. Andrew Cuomo
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Andrew+Cuomo%22> wants to cap the
        six-figure salaries of the state's school superintendents.
        > Cuomo said he will propose legislation this week to limit superintendent
        salaries based on student enrollment. His bill would allow salaries up
        to
        > $125,000 for the smallest rural districts and up to $175,000 for the
        largest
        > districts, often in affluent suburbs.
        > Cuomo singled out school administrator salaries in his State of the
        State
        > speech in February and joked that he would like to earn that much. He
        called
        > on school leaders complaining about his budget cuts to look at their own
        paychecks and make sacrifices there first.
        > While the salary cap may be politically popular, it will save only about
        $15
        > million, said Robert Lowry
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Robert+Lowry%22> , spokesman for the
        New
        > York State Council of School
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22New+York+State+Council+of+School%22>
        Superintendents. It ignores the reality that the governor's cuts are
        taking
        > $1.5 billion from schools, he said.
        > Lowry called the proposal "a distraction from the hard choices the
        superintendents, boards and voters have to make."
        > Cuomo's bill would make superintendents subject to the cap once their
        current contracts expire. Currently, 31 percent of superintendents make
        over
        > $179,000. The Syosset superintendent on Long Island is the state's
        highest
        > paid at $386,868. Cuomo's proposal, if passed by the Legislature, could
        force lower salaries for 319 superintendents, nearly half of the top
        district administrators in the state. Voters could override the cap. The
        move has echoes of another salary freeze that Gov. Mario Cuomo
        instituted in 1993, when he reined in the rising salaries of Board of
        Cooperative Educational Services
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Board+of+Cooperative+Educational+Services%2
        2> , or BOCES, superintendents. However, while those salaries are now
        limited to $166,572, that cap has done little to hold the line on costs
        because assistant BOCES superintendents, whose pay is not limited,
        routinely
        > make more than their bosses.
        > Cuomo's plan places political rhetoric ahead of long-term solutions that
        would save taxpayers money, said Oliver Robinson
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Oliver+Robinson%22> , superintendent of
        the
        > Shenendehowa school district. He said mandate relief that gives
        districts
        > more power in bargaining with employee unions would save real money.
        "The larger conversation that needs to be taking place is how do we
        focus
        > on
        > lowering costs for the state and the municipalities," he said.
        > Robinson, who said he works at least 70 hours a week, noted that
        districts
        > used to routinely get 100 applications for vacant superintendent jobs,
        but
        > that number has dropped to about half a dozen. He said a freeze would lower
        > the quality of the applicants for school leadership roles.
        > Last year, the average superintendent salary in New York was $163,000,
        according to the statewide superintendents group. The average nationally
        was
        > $160,000.
        > Cuomo has set aside $250 million in state aid for districts that achieve
        administrative efficiencies. He recently praised the Bethlehem school
        <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Bethlehem+school%22> district where
        administrators agreed to a pay freeze, a move instituted a year ago in
        the
        > Albany schools. Both districts are grappling with budget holes in the
        millions of dollars and plan to lay off dozens of teachers. Based on
        faculty
        > pay, their salary freezes probably saved just a single teaching job.
        Despite the lofty pay, superintendent jobs are increasingly harder to
        fill,
        > the Council of School Superintendents found. In many districts,
        including
        > Albany and Schenectady, interim leaders are now in place. Finding a
        permanent replacement can take years and the average superintendent
        keeps
        > the job for just a few years.
        > "It's already difficult to get people to take the job of schools
        superintendent," Lowry said. "It has become an increasingly difficult
        and
        > thankless job."
        > Reach Scott Waldman
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Scott+Waldman%22> at 454-5080 or by
        e-mail
        > at swaldman@.... The Associated Press
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
        l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22The+Associated+Press%22> contributed
        to
        > this story.
        > Read more:
        > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.
        php#ixzz1FJxBMscW>
        > http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.p
        hp#ixzz1FJxBMscW

      • Noah E Gotbaum
        -link below ... noah e gotbaum
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          -link below

          noah e gotbaum



          On Mar 1, 2011, at 7:13 AM, "Norm Scott" <normsco@...> wrote:

           

          I didn't read Leo Casey's "excellent" piece. Was there any mention of the UFT co-location charters occupying public schools.
          Norm

          Cheers
          Norm Scott

          Education Notes
          ednotesonline.blogspot.com
          Grassroots Education Movement

          Education Editor, The Wave
          www.rockawave.com

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


          From: "Mona Davids (NYCPA)" <mdavids@...>
          Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 01:48:17 -0500
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Cuomo Aims to Cap School Bosses Pay - What about Charters Bosses?

           

          Not gonna happen. They're all CEO's of the Charter Management
          Organizations (CMO's), a separate additional non-profit consultancy, that
          provides the back office and consulting services to the school.

          So, like the budget cuts and teacher layoffs, the superintendent salary
          caps DO NOT affect charters. Charters are rolling in the dough... and
          still demanding more money.

          > Wonder if given the budget crunch the Governor and legislature will hold
          the
          > charter school heads equally "accountable" and go after Deborah Kenny's
          $560k per year Harlem Village Academy salary, Geoff Canada's $500k+ or
          Eva
          > Moskowitz's almost $400k annual comp? Especially if, as they and the press
          > never fail to claim, "charters schools are public schools." (See Leo
          Casey's excellent EdWise piece of a few weeks ago on this -
          > http://www.edwize.org/will-governor-cuomo-take-on-outrageous-charter-superin
          tendent-pay-too)
          > Shouldn't these private/non-profit entrepreneurs overseeing millions in
          public funds and being paid by taxpayer dollars, be accountable and
          transparent to others besides themselves and their handpicked boards?
          http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay-
          1034245.php
          > School chiefs' pay at issue
          > Cuomo proposes cap on superintendent salaries; plan derided as a
          political
          > ploy
          > By Scott Waldman Staff Writer
          > Updated 11:45 p.m., Monday, February 28, 2011
          > http://csc.beap.ad.yieldmanager.net/i?bv=1.0.0&bs=(1242kcncb(gid$42201174-43
          c0-11e0-b5e8-8300c2e43ac8,st$1298955384328796,v$1.0))&t=blank&al=(as$11rc6a6
          7v,aid$IBtv7kwNjZE-,ct$25,at$0)
          > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_size.gifLarger
          > <javascript:hst_chsize('plus')> | Smaller
          > <javascript:hst_chsize('minus')>
          > <javascript:hst_print();>
          > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_print.gifPrintable Version
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay
          -1034245.php>
          > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_mail.gifEmail
          > This
          > Georgia (default)
          > Verdana
          > Times New Roman
          > Arial
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-aims-to-cap-school-bosses-pay
          -1034245.php>
          > http://www.newstimes.com/img/pages/article/tools_dropdown.gifFont Page 1
          of 1
          > ALBANY -- Gov. Andrew Cuomo
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Andrew+Cuomo%22> wants to cap the
          six-figure salaries of the state's school superintendents.
          > Cuomo said he will propose legislation this week to limit superintendent
          salaries based on student enrollment. His bill would allow salaries up
          to
          > $125,000 for the smallest rural districts and up to $175,000 for the
          largest
          > districts, often in affluent suburbs.
          > Cuomo singled out school administrator salaries in his State of the
          State
          > speech in February and joked that he would like to earn that much. He
          called
          > on school leaders complaining about his budget cuts to look at their own
          paychecks and make sacrifices there first.
          > While the salary cap may be politically popular, it will save only about
          $15
          > million, said Robert Lowry
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Robert+Lowry%22> , spokesman for the
          New
          > York State Council of School
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22New+York+State+Council+of+School%22>
          Superintendents. It ignores the reality that the governor's cuts are
          taking
          > $1.5 billion from schools, he said.
          > Lowry called the proposal "a distraction from the hard choices the
          superintendents, boards and voters have to make."
          > Cuomo's bill would make superintendents subject to the cap once their
          current contracts expire. Currently, 31 percent of superintendents make
          over
          > $179,000. The Syosset superintendent on Long Island is the state's
          highest
          > paid at $386,868. Cuomo's proposal, if passed by the Legislature, could
          force lower salaries for 319 superintendents, nearly half of the top
          district administrators in the state. Voters could override the cap. The
          move has echoes of another salary freeze that Gov. Mario Cuomo
          instituted in 1993, when he reined in the rising salaries of Board of
          Cooperative Educational Services
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Board+of+Cooperative+Educational+Services%2
          2> , or BOCES, superintendents. However, while those salaries are now
          limited to $166,572, that cap has done little to hold the line on costs
          because assistant BOCES superintendents, whose pay is not limited,
          routinely
          > make more than their bosses.
          > Cuomo's plan places political rhetoric ahead of long-term solutions that
          would save taxpayers money, said Oliver Robinson
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Oliver+Robinson%22> , superintendent of
          the
          > Shenendehowa school district. He said mandate relief that gives
          districts
          > more power in bargaining with employee unions would save real money.
          "The larger conversation that needs to be taking place is how do we
          focus
          > on
          > lowering costs for the state and the municipalities," he said.
          > Robinson, who said he works at least 70 hours a week, noted that
          districts
          > used to routinely get 100 applications for vacant superintendent jobs,
          but
          > that number has dropped to about half a dozen. He said a freeze would lower
          > the quality of the applicants for school leadership roles.
          > Last year, the average superintendent salary in New York was $163,000,
          according to the statewide superintendents group. The average nationally
          was
          > $160,000.
          > Cuomo has set aside $250 million in state aid for districts that achieve
          administrative efficiencies. He recently praised the Bethlehem school
          <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Bethlehem+school%22> district where
          administrators agreed to a pay freeze, a move instituted a year ago in
          the
          > Albany schools. Both districts are grappling with budget holes in the
          millions of dollars and plan to lay off dozens of teachers. Based on
          faculty
          > pay, their salary freezes probably saved just a single teaching job.
          Despite the lofty pay, superintendent jobs are increasingly harder to
          fill,
          > the Council of School Superintendents found. In many districts,
          including
          > Albany and Schenectady, interim leaders are now in place. Finding a
          permanent replacement can take years and the average superintendent
          keeps
          > the job for just a few years.
          > "It's already difficult to get people to take the job of schools
          superintendent," Lowry said. "It has become an increasingly difficult
          and
          > thankless job."
          > Reach Scott Waldman
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Scott+Waldman%22> at 454-5080 or by
          e-mail
          > at swaldman@.... The Associated Press
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=loca
          l&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22The+Associated+Press%22> contributed
          to
          > this story.
          > Read more:
          > <http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.
          php#ixzz1FJxBMscW>
          > http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/School-chiefs-pay-at-issue-1034245.p
          hp#ixzz1FJxBMscW

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