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Andrew Cuomo Education Positions

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  • Patrick Sullivan
    The Times is reporting today that recent polls show the governor s race is closer than expected. Party insiders believe Cuomo needs to do more to galvanize
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 23, 2010
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      The Times is reporting today that recent polls show the governor's race is closer than expected.  Party insiders believe Cuomo needs to do more to galvanize his own base.

      I pulled out the education points from Cuomo's 250-page positions document (below).  He focuses on improving efficiency of spending by reducing mandates and support for Race to the Top.

      I don't see much here to galvanize NYC voters focused on education.  Has anyone heard anything else from Cuomo on education?   Is he open to policies that are more supportive of students and teachers, like smaller class sizes?


      Make Education More Efficient

      In education, New York public schools spend
      more per student than any other state — fully 71
      percent more than the national average, yet New York
      ranks 40th in the rate of high school graduation.32
      Spending on salaries and benefits for teachers and
      other school district employees are also the highest in
      the nation.33 Yet only 67 percent of New York’s
      students graduate from high school,34 and only 58
      percent of these students receive a four year college
      degree by the age of 26.
      One of the main reasons New York spends so
      much more than comparable states is State mandates
      that dramatically increase the cost to school districts
      and local governments of providing a high quality
      education and other governmental services.
      ....

      Since 2003-04, school aid has increased at
      more than twice the rate of inflation.42 The State’s
      fiscal crisis makes it impossible for this rate of
      increase to be sustained. As part of reining in the
      growth of spending on education, the State must
      ensure that school aid is targeted and fair. Districts
      with the greatest
      educational need
      and the least
      ability to locally
      fund education
      must not bear the full brunt of any school aid cuts.
      Building aid and other forms of “reimbursable” aid
      must be scrutinized so that they do not distort a
      school district’s incentives to control costs. We
      should direct scarce dollars first to basic educational
      program needs before allowing expense-based
      reimbursements for building aid and support
      functions to escalate in an uncontrolled way. For
      example, even in districts where enrollment is in
      decline, “building aid” encourages construction and
      renovation. Expense-based reimbursements for
      “transportation aid” and other rules can discourage
      efficiencies or regional collaboration. A recent study
      from the State Comptroller’s Office estimated $145 to
      $365 million in potential annual savings from
      consolidation of school “back office” services.
      The State can cushion the impact of slowing
      the rate of growth in school aid by eliminating
      mandates that dramatically increase the cost of
      providing a quality education and by encouraging
      smaller school districts to achieve efficiencies
      through shared services and consolidation. While
      educational mandate reform must be an important
      part of the State’s education and fiscal agenda, this
      cannot mean sacrificing quality. Instead, educational
      mandate reform should focus on what matters for
      student performance and in the process loosen the
      bureaucratic grip of procedurally focused rules that
      do not improve education. For example, many
      educators decry seat-time requirements that must be
      met for certain programs, whether they are effective
      or not. As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will convene a
      group of educators, school management
      professionals, parents and others to evaluate the
      many mandate relief options already on the table.
      With mandate reform in many areas, local
      districts will be better able to reduce costs, including
      personnel costs which account for over 70 percent of
      school district expenses. School district personnel
      costs have been growing at a rate of close to 6 percent
      annually. Cutting that growth rate in half would
      enable school districts to save approximately $1
      billion annually, while freezing personnel costs would
      generate approximately $2 billion in savings from
      projected growth rates

      Win the Race to the Top in Education

      New York must be the leader when it comes to
      education reform. This starts with the increasing the
      charter school cap from 200 to 460. But increasing
      the cap won’t result in more charter schools if we too
      tightly restrict where they can be located or how they
      can be approved. We believe that public review and
      consultation are important—especially when charter
      schools will be co-located with traditional public
      schools—but this cannot become a poison pill that
      prevents opening new charter schools.
      As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will also oppose
      arbitrarily limiting the number of charter schools that
      can operate in a school district. And because SUNY
      has done a good job in approving and monitoring
      charter schools, we should continue to allow SUNY to
      have shared authority for approving charter schools
      with the Board of Regents—which to its credit has
      become more supportive of charter schools in recent
      years.

      As a strong supporter of charter schools,
      Andrew Cuomo understands how important it is to
      retain high standards and strong accountability.
      Charter schools that fail to perform at the levels
      promised at the time the charter school application
      was granted should be closed. Andrew Cuomo also
      supports provisions that will require charter schools
      to increase their enrollment of special education and
      ELL students—so that they are comparable to levels
      of neighboring schools.

      Finally, in order to win the race to the top in
      education means being committed to the four
      education reform principles that underlay the federal
      Race to the Top process: (1) a commitment to
      rigorous standards and assessments; (2) recruiting,
      preparing and supporting great teachers and school
      principals; (3) building instructional data systems
      that measure student success and inform teachers
      and principals how they can improve their teaching
      practices; and (4) turning around struggling schools.
    • Dee Alpert
      Andrew floated an idea via a poll his people took about 6 months ago asking if folks thought the Board of Regents should be abolished. It should, thus
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 23, 2010
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        Andrew floated an idea via a poll his people took about 6 months ago asking if folks thought the Board of Regents should be abolished.  It should, thus eliminating Shelly Silver's virtually absolute control over real public education governance and control in NYS. but the fact that this question was even being asked raised an awful lot of eyebrows.  Guess Andrew took a lot of flack for the trial balloon and it got shot down, never to be mentioned publicly again.

        Criminal investigations Cuomo has run on school district and BOCES routine corruption, and NYSED facilitation of these schemes, has clued him in as to how bad the system of school governance in NYS really is.  But the odds of him saying much about really dealing with this prior to the election are nil.

        His published positions on education have nothing to do with class size reduction.  I suss all you could get out of him on this issue is that if school administration all over NYS is cleaned up, there would be a lot more money available for class size reduction ... or anything else districts legitimately wanted to spend it on.

        Dee Alpert


        On 9/23/2010 8:31 AM, Patrick Sullivan wrote:  

        The Times is reporting today that recent polls show the governor's race is closer than expected.  Party insiders believe Cuomo needs to do more to galvanize his own base.

        I pulled out the education points from Cuomo's 250-page positions document (below).  He focuses on improving efficiency of spending by reducing mandates and support for Race to the Top.

        I don't see much here to galvanize NYC voters focused on education.  Has anyone heard anything else from Cuomo on education?   Is he open to policies that are more supportive of students and teachers, like smaller class sizes?


        Make Education More Efficient

        In education, New York public schools spend
        more per student than any other state — fully 71
        percent more than the national average, yet New York
        ranks 40th in the rate of high school graduation.32
        Spending on salaries and benefits for teachers and
        other school district employees are also the highest in
        the nation.33 Yet only 67 percent of New York’s
        students graduate from high school,34 and only 58
        percent of these students receive a four year college
        degree by the age of 26.
        One of the main reasons New York spends so
        much more than comparable states is State mandates
        that dramatically increase the cost to school districts
        and local governments of providing a high quality
        education and other governmental services.
        ....

        Since 2003-04, school aid has increased at
        more than twice the rate of inflation.42 The State’s
        fiscal crisis makes it impossible for this rate of
        increase to be sustained. As part of reining in the
        growth of spending on education, the State must
        ensure that school aid is targeted and fair. Districts
        with the greatest
        educational need
        and the least
        ability to locally
        fund education
        must not bear the full brunt of any school aid cuts.
        Building aid and other forms of “reimbursable” aid
        must be scrutinized so that they do not distort a
        school district’s incentives to control costs. We
        should direct scarce dollars first to basic educational
        program needs before allowing expense-based
        reimbursements for building aid and support
        functions to escalate in an uncontrolled way. For
        example, even in districts where enrollment is in
        decline, “building aid” encourages construction and
        renovation. Expense-based reimbursements for
        “transportation aid” and other rules can discourage
        efficiencies or regional collaboration. A recent study
        from the State Comptroller’s Office estimated $145 to
        $365 million in potential annual savings from
        consolidation of school “back office” services.
        The State can cushion the impact of slowing
        the rate of growth in school aid by eliminating
        mandates that dramatically increase the cost of
        providing a quality education and by encouraging
        smaller school districts to achieve efficiencies
        through shared services and consolidation. While
        educational mandate reform must be an important
        part of the State’s education and fiscal agenda, this
        cannot mean sacrificing quality. Instead, educational
        mandate reform should focus on what matters for
        student performance and in the process loosen the
        bureaucratic grip of procedurally focused rules that
        do not improve education. For example, many
        educators decry seat-time requirements that must be
        met for certain programs, whether they are effective
        or not. As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will convene a
        group of educators, school management
        professionals, parents and others to evaluate the
        many mandate relief options already on the table.
        With mandate reform in many areas, local
        districts will be better able to reduce costs, including
        personnel costs which account for over 70 percent of
        school district expenses. School district personnel
        costs have been growing at a rate of close to 6 percent
        annually. Cutting that growth rate in half would
        enable school districts to save approximately $1
        billion annually, while freezing personnel costs would
        generate approximately $2 billion in savings from
        projected growth rates

        Win the Race to the Top in Education

        New York must be the leader when it comes to
        education reform. This starts with the increasing the
        charter school cap from 200 to 460. But increasing
        the cap won’t result in more charter schools if we too
        tightly restrict where they can be located or how they
        can be approved. We believe that public review and
        consultation are important—especially when charter
        schools will be co-located with traditional public
        schools—but this cannot become a poison pill that
        prevents opening new charter schools.
        As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will also oppose
        arbitrarily limiting the number of charter schools that
        can operate in a school district. And because SUNY
        has done a good job in approving and monitoring
        charter schools, we should continue to allow SUNY to
        have shared authority for approving charter schools
        with the Board of Regents—which to its credit has
        become more supportive of charter schools in recent
        years.

        As a strong supporter of charter schools,
        Andrew Cuomo understands how important it is to
        retain high standards and strong accountability.
        Charter schools that fail to perform at the levels
        promised at the time the charter school application
        was granted should be closed. Andrew Cuomo also
        supports provisions that will require charter schools
        to increase their enrollment of special education and
        ELL students—so that they are comparable to levels
        of neighboring schools.

        Finally, in order to win the race to the top in
        education means being committed to the four
        education reform principles that underlay the federal
        Race to the Top process: (1) a commitment to
        rigorous standards and assessments; (2) recruiting,
        preparing and supporting great teachers and school
        principals; (3) building instructional data systems
        that measure student success and inform teachers
        and principals how they can improve their teaching
        practices; and (4) turning around struggling schools.

      • Diane Ravitch
        Patrick Take him at his word He won big bucks from DFER Diane Sent from my iPhone On Sep 23, 2010, at 8:31 AM, Patrick Sullivan ... Patrick Take him at his
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 23, 2010
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          Patrick

          Take him at his word

          He won big bucks from DFER

          Diane

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Sep 23, 2010, at 8:31 AM, Patrick Sullivan <patk.j.sullivan@...> wrote:

           

          The Times is reporting today that recent polls show the governor's race is closer than expected.  Party insiders believe Cuomo needs to do more to galvanize his own base.

          I pulled out the education points from Cuomo's 250-page positions document (below).  He focuses on improving efficiency of spending by reducing mandates and support for Race to the Top.

          I don't see much here to galvanize NYC voters focused on education.  Has anyone heard anything else from Cuomo on education?   Is he open to policies that are more supportive of students and teachers, like smaller class sizes?


          Make Education More Efficient

          In education, New York public schools spend
          more per student than any other state — fully 71
          percent more than the national average, yet New York
          ranks 40th in the rate of high school graduation.32
          Spending on salaries and benefits for teachers and
          other school district employees are also the highest in
          the nation.33 Yet only 67 percent of New York’s
          students graduate from high school,34 and only 58
          percent of these students receive a four year college
          degree by the age of 26.
          One of the main reasons New York spends so
          much more than comparable states is State mandates
          that dramatically increase the cost to school districts
          and local governments of providing a high quality
          education and other governmental services.
          ....

          Since 2003-04, school aid has increased at
          more than twice the rate of inflation.42 The State’s
          fiscal crisis makes it impossible for this rate of
          increase to be sustained. As part of reining in the
          growth of spending on education, the State must
          ensure that school aid is targeted and fair. Districts
          with the greatest
          educational need
          and the least
          ability to locally
          fund education
          must not bear the full brunt of any school aid cuts.
          Building aid and other forms of “reimbursable” aid
          must be scrutinized so that they do not distort a
          school district’s incentives to control costs. We
          should direct scarce dollars first to basic educational
          program needs before allowing expense-based
          reimbursements for building aid and support
          functions to escalate in an uncontrolled way. For
          example, even in districts where enrollment is in
          decline, “building aid” encourages construction and
          renovation. Expense-based reimbursements for
          “transportation aid” and other rules can discourage
          efficiencies or regional collaboration. A recent study
          from the State Comptroller’s Office estimated $145 to
          $365 million in potential annual savings from
          consolidation of school “back office” services.
          The State can cushion the impact of slowing
          the rate of growth in school aid by eliminating
          mandates that dramatically increase the cost of
          providing a quality education and by encouraging
          smaller school districts to achieve efficiencies
          through shared services and consolidation. While
          educational mandate reform must be an important
          part of the State’s education and fiscal agenda, this
          cannot mean sacrificing quality. Instead, educational
          mandate reform should focus on what matters for
          student performance and in the process loosen the
          bureaucratic grip of procedurally focused rules that
          do not improve education. For example, many
          educators decry seat-time requirements that must be
          met for certain programs, whether they are effective
          or not. As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will convene a
          group of educators, school management
          professionals, parents and others to evaluate the
          many mandate relief options already on the table.
          With mandate reform in many areas, local
          districts will be better able to reduce costs, including
          personnel costs which account for over 70 percent of
          school district expenses. School district personnel
          costs have been growing at a rate of close to 6 percent
          annually. Cutting that growth rate in half would
          enable school districts to save approximately $1
          billion annually, while freezing personnel costs would
          generate approximately $2 billion in savings from
          projected growth rates

          Win the Race to the Top in Education

          New York must be the leader when it comes to
          education reform. This starts with the increasing the
          charter school cap from 200 to 460. But increasing
          the cap won’t result in more charter schools if we too
          tightly restrict where they can be located or how they
          can be approved. We believe that public review and
          consultation are important—especially when charter
          schools will be co-located with traditional public
          schools—but this cannot become a poison pill that
          prevents opening new charter schools.
          As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will also oppose
          arbitrarily limiting the number of charter schools that
          can operate in a school district. And because SUNY
          has done a good job in approving and monitoring
          charter schools, we should continue to allow SUNY to
          have shared authority for approving charter schools
          with the Board of Regents—which to its credit has
          become more supportive of charter schools in recent
          years.

          As a strong supporter of charter schools,
          Andrew Cuomo understands how important it is to
          retain high standards and strong accountability.
          Charter schools that fail to perform at the levels
          promised at the time the charter school application
          was granted should be closed. Andrew Cuomo also
          supports provisions that will require charter schools
          to increase their enrollment of special education and
          ELL students—so that they are comparable to levels
          of neighboring schools.

          Finally, in order to win the race to the top in
          education means being committed to the four
          education reform principles that underlay the federal
          Race to the Top process: (1) a commitment to
          rigorous standards and assessments; (2) recruiting,
          preparing and supporting great teachers and school
          principals; (3) building instructional data systems
          that measure student success and inform teachers
          and principals how they can improve their teaching
          practices; and (4) turning around struggling schools.

        • Mona Davids
          Cuomo belongs to DFER. He met Joe Williams and other hedge hogs in May at the Regency Hotel. At the meeting, he sold his political soul AND public education
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 23, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Cuomo belongs to DFER.  He met Joe Williams and other hedge hogs in May at the Regency Hotel.

            At the meeting, he sold his political soul AND public education to them.  Of course, after the meeting, like the other puppet candidates, the checks started rolling in.

            I wonder where Paladino stands on public education.

            On Sep 23, 2010, at 8:58 AM, Diane Ravitch wrote:


            Patrick

            Take him at his word

            He won big bucks from DFER

            Diane

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Sep 23, 2010, at 8:31 AM, Patrick Sullivan <patk.j.sullivan@...> wrote:

             

            The Times is reporting today that recent polls show the governor's race is closer than expected.  Party insiders believe Cuomo needs to do more to galvanize his own base.

            I pulled out the education points from Cuomo's 250-page positions document (below).  He focuses on improving efficiency of spending by reducing mandates and support for Race to the Top.

            I don't see much here to galvanize NYC voters focused on education.  Has anyone heard anything else from Cuomo on education?   Is he open to policies that are more supportive of students and teachers, like smaller class sizes?


            Make Education More Efficient

            In education, New York public schools spend
            more per student than any other state — fully 71
            percent more than the national average, yet New York
            ranks 40th in the rate of high school graduation.32
            Spending on salaries and benefits for teachers and
            other school district employees are also the highest in
            the nation.33 Yet only 67 percent of New York’s
            students graduate from high school,34 and only 58
            percent of these students receive a four year college
            degree by the age of 26.
            One of the main reasons New York spends so
            much more than comparable states is State mandates
            that dramatically increase the cost to school districts
            and local governments of providing a high quality
            education and other governmental services.
            ....

            Since 2003-04, school aid has increased at
            more than twice the rate of inflation.42 The State’s
            fiscal crisis makes it impossible for this rate of
            increase to be sustained. As part of reining in the
            growth of spending on education, the State must
            ensure that school aid is targeted and fair. Districts
            with the greatest
            educational need
            and the least
            ability to locally
            fund education
            must not bear the full brunt of any school aid cuts.
            Building aid and other forms of “reimbursable” aid
            must be scrutinized so that they do not distort a
            school district’s incentives to control costs. We
            should direct scarce dollars first to basic educational
            program needs before allowing expense-based
            reimbursements for building aid and support
            functions to escalate in an uncontrolled way. For
            example, even in districts where enrollment is in
            decline, “building aid” encourages construction and
            renovation. Expense-based reimbursements for
            “transportation aid” and other rules can discourage
            efficiencies or regional collaboration. A recent study
            from the State Comptroller’s Office estimated $145 to
            $365 million in potential annual savings from
            consolidation of school “back office” services.
            The State can cushion the impact of slowing
            the rate of growth in school aid by eliminating
            mandates that dramatically increase the cost of
            providing a quality education and by encouraging
            smaller school districts to achieve efficiencies
            through shared services and consolidation. While
            educational mandate reform must be an important
            part of the State’s education and fiscal agenda, this
            cannot mean sacrificing quality. Instead, educational
            mandate reform should focus on what matters for
            student performance and in the process loosen the
            bureaucratic grip of procedurally focused rules that
            do not improve education. For example, many
            educators decry seat-time requirements that must be
            met for certain programs, whether they are effective
            or not. As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will convene a
            group of educators, school management
            professionals, parents and others to evaluate the
            many mandate relief options already on the table.
            With mandate reform in many areas, local
            districts will be better able to reduce costs, including
            personnel costs which account for over 70 percent of
            school district expenses. School district personnel
            costs have been growing at a rate of close to 6 percent
            annually. Cutting that growth rate in half would
            enable school districts to save approximately $1
            billion annually, while freezing personnel costs would
            generate approximately $2 billion in savings from
            projected growth rates

            Win the Race to the Top in Education

            New York must be the leader when it comes to
            education reform. This starts with the increasing the
            charter school cap from 200 to 460. But increasing
            the cap won’t result in more charter schools if we too
            tightly restrict where they can be located or how they
            can be approved. We believe that public review and
            consultation are important—especially when charter
            schools will be co-located with traditional public
            schools—but this cannot become a poison pill that
            prevents opening new charter schools.
            As Governor, Andrew Cuomo will also oppose
            arbitrarily limiting the number of charter schools that
            can operate in a school district. And because SUNY
            has done a good job in approving and monitoring
            charter schools, we should continue to allow SUNY to
            have shared authority for approving charter schools
            with the Board of Regents—which to its credit has
            become more supportive of charter schools in recent
            years.

            As a strong supporter of charter schools,
            Andrew Cuomo understands how important it is to
            retain high standards and strong accountability.
            Charter schools that fail to perform at the levels
            promised at the time the charter school application
            was granted should be closed. Andrew Cuomo also
            supports provisions that will require charter schools
            to increase their enrollment of special education and
            ELL students—so that they are comparable to levels
            of neighboring schools.

            Finally, in order to win the race to the top in
            education means being committed to the four
            education reform principles that underlay the federal
            Race to the Top process: (1) a commitment to
            rigorous standards and assessments; (2) recruiting,
            preparing and supporting great teachers and school
            principals; (3) building instructional data systems
            that measure student success and inform teachers
            and principals how they can improve their teaching
            practices; and (4) turning around struggling schools.



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