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Fwd: LA analysis : : RACE, CLASS, API AND "VALUE ADDED" ANALYSIS

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  • LRN1212@aol.com
    Subject: [NYCoRE] Fwd: RACE, CLASS, API AND VALUE ADDED ANALYSIS Begin forwarded message: From: Michael Stryer Date: August 30, 2010
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 1, 2010
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      Subject: [NYCoRE] Fwd: RACE, CLASS, API AND "VALUE ADDED" ANALYSIS


      Begin forwarded message:
      From: Michael Stryer <mjstryer@...>
      Date: August 30, 2010 10:08:52 AM PDT
      Subject: [PEAC] RACE, CLASS, API AND "VALUE ADDED" ANALYSIS

      A careful analysis of the Times database's "most effective" and "least effective" schools raises serious concerns about whether the “value added” rating system truly measures student progress while screening out other factors.  Of particular concern is the extremely strong correlation between a school’s “value added” rating and its racial/ethnic makeup, its socio-economic status, and its existing level of academic achievement (as measured by API).
       
       
      To summarize:
       
      1)   Race/Ethnicity: 
      a.    25 “Least Effective” Schools: African-American/Latino students account for an average of 91% of the student population

      b.   25 “Most Effective” Schools: African-American/Latino students account for an average of 59% of the student population

      c.    In L.A. Unified overall, African-American/Latino students account for 85% of the student population
       
      2)  Socio-Economic Status
      a.    25 “Least Effective” Schools: students qualifying for free or reduced lunch account for an average of 84% of the student population

      b.   25 “Most Effective” Schools: students qualifying for free or reduced lunch account for an average of 62% of the student population

      c.    In L.A. Unified overall, students account for 78% of the student population
       
      3)  Academic Proficiency (2009 API Scores)
      a.    25 “Least Effective” Schools: Average API in these schools was 713

      b.   25 “Most Effective” Schools: Average API in these schools was 852
       
      In sum, the 25 schools classified as the most "highly effective" were 10X more likely to have API scores over 800 than the 25 schools ranked as "least effective. " Of the 25 "most effective" schools, 84% had APIs above 800.  In contrast, of the 25 "least effective schools," only 8% had API's above 800.
       
       
      While we might expect some correlation between the ratings and API scores, the strength of the correlation strongly suggests that the ratings of "most effective" and "least effective" are heavily dependent on the overall academic proficiency of a particular school's students (and NOT purely the academic progress as the Times claims). 

      In essence, it sure helps to have a "better" school (if measured by API) in order to make better "progress" (if measured by "value-added")...
       
       
      Mike Stryer
      Teacher, Fairfax High School
      310-849-3069

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