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Re: NAACP in the closings lawsuit

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  • RichardEdBarr@aol.com
    Of course it peeves them--makes it harder for Bloomberg and Klein to continue claiming to be civil rights heroes, and to trade on Walcott having come to
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2010
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      Of course it peeves them--makes it harder for Bloomberg and Klein to continue claiming to be civil rights heroes, and to trade on  Walcott having come to Bloomberg from the Urban League.
       
      Their UFT-bashing is particularly hypocritical--they didn't seem to mind when Randi Weingarten was probably as much responsible as anyone/anything for getting Shelly Silver to roll over for them on continuing mayoral control.
       
      (To be even-handed about it, though I'm thrilled that Michael Mulgrew has followed through on his threat to sue over the closings which he made at the PEP meeting --- GO UFT! -- still, one can easily point out that the UFT also has it both ways in re: Bloomberg & the DOE.  Support them one minute, attack them the next.)
       
      In a message dated 2/1/2010 7:16:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, leonie@... writes:


      It really peeves the city that the NAACP is involved; thank god that they're not afraid to stand up to Bloomberg and Klein, as so many other groups seem to be.
       
      see also

      Teachers union sues city to put 19 school closures on pause

      GothamSchools - Anna Phillips -

      http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/01/teachers-union-and-naacp-sue-to-stop-school-closings/

       
      February 1, 2010, 5:09 pm

      Teachers’ Union and N.A.A.C.P. Sue to Stop School Closings

      By SHARON OTTERMAN

      The city’s teachers’ union and the N.A.A.C.P. filed a lawsuit on Monday to block the closing of 19 schools for poor performance, charging that the city “studiously ignored” provisions of state law as it moved forward in its process to shutter the schools.

       

      The suit charges that the city did not conduct the required analysis of how the closings would affect the more than 13,000 students who attend the schools, particularly special education and other high-needs populations, and that it failed to analyze how the closings would affect the other, often overcrowded schools nearby.

       

      Instead, the suit charges that the Educational Impact Statements for each closed school, which were mandated by the new mayoral control law passed by the Legislature last year, contained boilerplate language and insufficient detail.


       

      For example, for Paul Robeson High School, a closing Brooklyn school with special programs for young mothers and other at-risk youth, the impact statement summarized the “community ramifications” with this vague paragraph:

       

      “Approximately 1,020 high school seats will be eliminated by the phase-out of Paul Robeson High School. However, the majority of those seats will be recovered with the phase-in of new schools throughout the city and available seats in existing high schools.”

       

      Filed in State Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit also alleges that the city failed to provide appropriate notice of public hearings and made other procedural errors in the run-up to last Tuesday, when the Panel for Educational Policy, a 13-member board controlled by the mayor, voted to close the schools after a raucous, eight-hour long hearing attended by thousands of protesters.

       

      For weeks, city officials have been promoting the message that the teachers’ union is ginning up much of the opposition to the closings, for political reasons and to save jobs. The union is engaged in protracted contract negotiations with City Hall, and faces 2,500 potential layoffs if it doesn’t agree to cut its members’ raises from 4 percent per year to between 1.4 percent and 2 percent.

       

      In the past few days, however, the mayor’s office has expressed particular displeasure with the joining of the lawsuit by the N.A.A.C.P., the 100-year-old civil rights organization.

       

      “Why the N.A.A.C.P joined a lawsuit to keep persistently failing schools open is mind-boggling and incredible,” Deputy Mayor Dennis M. Walcott said on Monday. As for the procedural violations alleged by the suit, Mr. Walcott said, “We feel we’ve met the letter of the law, but that’s going to be discussed in court.”

       

      Hazel N. Dukes, the N.A.A.C.P. state president, objected Monday to how her organization was being portrayed by City Hall.

       

      “We are not puppets for the U.F.T. or elected officials,” she said at a news conference. “We are here because parents have made complaints about their children not receiving their rights in the school system here.”

       

      Also named as plaintiffs in the suit are: Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president; the Alliance for Quality Education, a non-profit organization; four state legislators; five City Council members; and parents and teachers from the closing schools.

      --
      Leonie Haimson
      Class Size Matters
      124 Waverly Pl.
      New York, NY 10011
      212-674-7320
      leonie@...
      www.classsizematters.org
    • melmeer1@verizon.net
      Well, that s just the point regarding the UFT, which will lose this lawsuit IMO.* First they go to Albany and lobby to give the Mayor the absolute and
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2010
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        Well, that's just the point regarding the UFT, which will lose this lawsuit IMO.*  First they go to Albany and lobby to give the Mayor the absolute and dictatorial power to close the schools (among other things) and then they complain that he is doing exactly that.

        Melvyn Meer

        *In any event, even if they win they will lose for all that the DoE has to do is to flesh out the reports.  It's just like the  so-called hearings--they have to listen, but they don't really have to hear.


        RichardEdBarr@... wrote:
         

        Of course it peeves them--makes it harder for Bloomberg and Klein to continue claiming to be civil rights heroes, and to trade on  Walcott having come to Bloomberg from the Urban League.
         
        Their UFT-bashing is particularly hypocritical- -they didn't seem to mind when Randi Weingarten was probably as much responsible as anyone/anything for getting Shelly Silver to roll over for them on continuing mayoral control.
         
        (To be even-handed about it, though I'm thrilled that Michael Mulgrew has followed through on his threat to sue over the closings which he made at the PEP meeting --- GO UFT! -- still, one can easily point out that the UFT also has it both ways in re: Bloomberg & the DOE.  Support them one minute, attack them the next.)
         
        In a message dated 2/1/2010 7:16:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, leonie@... writes:


        It really peeves the city that the NAACP is involved; thank god that they're not afraid to stand up to Bloomberg and Klein, as so many other groups seem to be.
         
        see also

        Teachers union sues city to put 19 school closures on pause

        GothamSchools - Anna Phillips -

        http://cityroom. blogs.nytimes. com/2010/ 02/01/teachers- union-and- naacp-sue- to-stop-school- closings/

         
        February 1, 2010, 5:09 pm

        Teachers’ Union and N.A.A.C.P. Sue to Stop School Closings

        By SHARON OTTERMAN

        The city’s teachers’ union and the N.A.A.C.P. filed a lawsuit on Monday to block the closing of 19 schools for poor performance, charging that the city “studiously ignored” provisions of state law as it moved forward in its process to shutter the schools.

         

        The suit charges that the city did not conduct the required analysis of how the closings would affect the more than 13,000 students who attend the schools, particularly special education and other high-needs populations, and that it failed to analyze how the closings would affect the other, often overcrowded schools nearby.

         

        Instead, the suit charges that the Educational Impact Statements for each closed school, which were mandated by the new mayoral control law passed by the Legislature last year, contained boilerplate language and insufficient detail.


         

        For example, for Paul Robeson High School, a closing Brooklyn school with special programs for young mothers and other at-risk youth, the impact statement summarized the “community ramifications” with this vague paragraph:

         

        “Approximately 1,020 high school seats will be eliminated by the phase-out of Paul Robeson High School. However, the majority of those seats will be recovered with the phase-in of new schools throughout the city and available seats in existing high schools.”

         

        Filed in State Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit also alleges that the city failed to provide appropriate notice of public hearings and made other procedural errors in the run-up to last Tuesday, when the Panel for Educational Policy, a 13-member board controlled by the mayor, voted to close the schools after a raucous, eight-hour long hearing attended by thousands of protesters.

         

        For weeks, city officials have been promoting the message that the teachers’ union is ginning up much of the opposition to the closings, for political reasons and to save jobs. The union is engaged in protracted contract negotiations with City Hall, and faces 2,500 potential layoffs if it doesn’t agree to cut its members’ raises from 4 percent per year to between 1.4 percent and 2 percent.

         

        In the past few days, however, the mayor’s office has expressed particular displeasure with the joining of the lawsuit by the N.A.A.C.P., the 100-year-old civil rights organization.

         

        “Why the N.A.A.C.P joined a lawsuit to keep persistently failing schools open is mind-boggling and incredible,” Deputy Mayor Dennis M. Walcott said on Monday. As for the procedural violations alleged by the suit, Mr. Walcott said, “We feel we’ve met the letter of the law, but that’s going to be discussed in court.”

         

        Hazel N. Dukes, the N.A.A.C.P. state president, objected Monday to how her organization was being portrayed by City Hall.

         

        “We are not puppets for the U.F.T. or elected officials,” she said at a news conference. “We are here because parents have made complaints about their children not receiving their rights in the school system here.”

         

        Also named as plaintiffs in the suit are: Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president; the Alliance for Quality Education, a non-profit organization; four state legislators; five City Council members; and parents and teachers from the closing schools.

        --
        Leonie Haimson
        Class Size Matters
        124 Waverly Pl.
        New York, NY 10011
        212-674-7320
        leonie@...
        www.classsizematter s.org
      • norscot@aol.com
        A perfect oppty to revive the old story about the guy who murders his parents and pleads for mercy on the grounds he is an orphan. Norm Sent from my Verizon
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2010
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          A perfect oppty to revive the old story about the guy who murders his parents and pleads for mercy on the grounds he is an orphan.
          Norm

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


          From: melmeer1@...
          Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 21:53:31 -0500
          To: <nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: NAACP in the closings lawsuit

           

          Well, that's just the point regarding the UFT, which will lose this lawsuit IMO.*  First they go to Albany and lobby to give the Mayor the absolute and dictatorial power to close the schools (among other things) and then they complain that he is doing exactly that.

          Melvyn Meer

          *In any event, even if they win they will lose for all that the DoE has to do is to flesh out the reports.  It's just like the  so-called hearings--they have to listen, but they don't really have to hear.


          RichardEdBarr@ aol.com wrote:

           

          Of course it peeves them--makes it harder for Bloomberg and Klein to continue claiming to be civil rights heroes, and to trade on  Walcott having come to Bloomberg from the Urban League.
           
          Their UFT-bashing is particularly hypocritical- -they didn't seem to mind when Randi Weingarten was probably as much responsible as anyone/anything for getting Shelly Silver to roll over for them on continuing mayoral control.
           
          (To be even-handed about it, though I'm thrilled that Michael Mulgrew has followed through on his threat to sue over the closings which he made at the PEP meeting --- GO UFT! -- still, one can easily point out that the UFT also has it both ways in re: Bloomberg & the DOE.  Support them one minute, attack them the next.)
           
          In a message dated 2/1/2010 7:16:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, leonie@... writes:


          It really peeves the city that the NAACP is involved; thank god that they're not afraid to stand up to Bloomberg and Klein, as so many other groups seem to be.
           
          see also

          Teachers union sues city to put 19 school closures on pause

          GothamSchools - Anna Phillips -

          http://cityroom. blogs.nytimes. com/2010/ 02/01/teachers- union-and- naacp-sue- to-stop-school- closings/

           
          February 1, 2010, 5:09 pm

          Teachers’ Union and N.A.A.C.P. Sue to Stop School Closings

          By SHARON OTTERMAN

          The city’s teachers’ union and the N.A.A.C.P. filed a lawsuit on Monday to block the closing of 19 schools for poor performance, charging that the city “studiously ignored” provisions of state law as it moved forward in its process to shutter the schools.

           

          The suit charges that the city did not conduct the required analysis of how the closings would affect the more than 13,000 students who attend the schools, particularly special education and other high-needs populations, and that it failed to analyze how the closings would affect the other, often overcrowded schools nearby.

           

          Instead, the suit charges that the Educational Impact Statements for each closed school, which were mandated by the new mayoral control law passed by the Legislature last year, contained boilerplate language and insufficient detail.


           

          For example, for Paul Robeson High School, a closing Brooklyn school with special programs for young mothers and other at-risk youth, the impact statement summarized the “community ramifications” with this vague paragraph:

           

          “Approximately 1,020 high school seats will be eliminated by the phase-out of Paul Robeson High School. However, the majority of those seats will be recovered with the phase-in of new schools throughout the city and available seats in existing high schools.”

           

          Filed in State Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit also alleges that the city failed to provide appropriate notice of public hearings and made other procedural errors in the run-up to last Tuesday, when the Panel for Educational Policy, a 13-member board controlled by the mayor, voted to close the schools after a raucous, eight-hour long hearing attended by thousands of protesters.

           

          For weeks, city officials have been promoting the message that the teachers’ union is ginning up much of the opposition to the closings, for political reasons and to save jobs. The union is engaged in protracted contract negotiations with City Hall, and faces 2,500 potential layoffs if it doesn’t agree to cut its members’ raises from 4 percent per year to between 1.4 percent and 2 percent.

           

          In the past few days, however, the mayor’s office has expressed particular displeasure with the joining of the lawsuit by the N.A.A.C.P., the 100-year-old civil rights organization.

           

          “Why the N.A.A.C.P joined a lawsuit to keep persistently failing schools open is mind-boggling and incredible,” Deputy Mayor Dennis M. Walcott said on Monday. As for the procedural violations alleged by the suit, Mr. Walcott said, “We feel we’ve met the letter of the law, but that’s going to be discussed in court.”

           

          Hazel N. Dukes, the N.A.A.C.P. state president, objected Monday to how her organization was being portrayed by City Hall.

           

          “We are not puppets for the U.F.T. or elected officials,” she said at a news conference. “We are here because parents have made complaints about their children not receiving their rights in the school system here.”

           

          Also named as plaintiffs in the suit are: Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president; the Alliance for Quality Education, a non-profit organization; four state legislators; five City Council members; and parents and teachers from the closing schools.

          --
          Leonie Haimson
          Class Size Matters
          124 Waverly Pl.
          New York, NY 10011
          212-674-7320
          leonie@...
          www.classsizematter s.org
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