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RE: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor

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  • Leonie Haimson
    It has to be public by law. Leonie Haimson Executive Director Class Size Matters 124 Waverly Pl. New York, NY 10011 212-674-7320 classsizematters@gmail.com
    Message 1 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009

      It has to be public by law.

       

      Leonie Haimson
      Executive Director
      Class Size Matters
      124 Waverly Pl.
      New York , NY 10011
      212-674-7320
      classsizematters@...
      www.classsizematters.org
      http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

       

      Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

       


      From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of seung
      Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
      To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor

       




      leonie,

       

      Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

       

      Seung

      On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

       

      Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

      This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

      As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

      By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

      Published: June 30, 2009

      http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

      Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

      Skip to next paragraph

      Enlarge This Image

      Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

      Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany .

      The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

      At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

      But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

      Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

      “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

      Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

      “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

      Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

      Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

      Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

      “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

      As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

      The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

      The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

      Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

      In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

       

       

      Leonie Haimson
      Executive Director
      Class Size Matters
      124 Waverly Pl.
      New York , NY 10011
      212-674-7320
      classsizematters@ gmail.com
      www.classsizematter s.org
      http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

       

      Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

       

       

    • Beth Bernett
      I just called Stringer s office. they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a policy line. I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not
      Message 2 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
        I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.
        BB
        On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:




        People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

         

        Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

         

        Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

         

        Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

         

        Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

         

        Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

         

        SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

         

        People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

         

        At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

         

        Leonie Haimson
        Executive Director
        Class Size Matters
        124 Waverly Pl.
        New York ,  NY  10011
        212-674-7320
        classsizematters@ gmail.com
        www.classsizematter s.org
        http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

         

        Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

         


        From:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
        Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
        To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor

         




        leonie,

         

        Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

         

        Seung

        On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

         

        Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

        This is terribly disappointing to  Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

        As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

        By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

        Published: June 30, 2009

        http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

        Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the  New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

        Skip to next paragraph

        Enlarge This Image

        <image001.jpg>

        Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

        Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in  Albany .

        The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

        At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in  Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

        But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

        Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

        “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

        Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former  Hostos  Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

        “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

        Marty Markowitz, the  Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

        Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

        Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

        “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until  Albany votes on the matter.

        As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York,  Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

        The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

        The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

        Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of  Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

        In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

         

         

        Leonie Haimson
        Executive Director
        Class Size Matters
        124 Waverly Pl.
        New York ,  NY  10011
        212-674-7320
        classsizematters@ gmail.com
        www.classsizematter s.org
        http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

         

        Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

         

         



      • Paola de Kock
        I think we should call all of them, not just our BP. Our children don t necessarily go to school in the borough in which they live and, more importantly,
        Message 3 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009

          I think we should call all of them, not just “our BP.”  Our children don’t necessarily go to school in the borough in which they live and, more importantly, education is a city-wide issue.  If what the Queen’s PB appointee does affects your child, why shouldn’t you call her even if you live in a different borough?

           

          …………….I just saw she appointed Wolcott!!!  All the more reason to call and shame her.

           

          Paola de Kock

           

          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
          Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:23 AM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: Classsizematters@Yahoogroups. Com; icope@yahoogroups.com; D2 parents; District 3 Parent List
          Subject: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

           




          People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

           

          Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

           

          Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

           

          Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

           

          Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

           

          Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

           

          SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

           

          People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

           

          At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

           

          Leonie Haimson
          Executive Director
          Class Size Matters
          124 Waverly Pl.
          New York, NY 10011
          212-674-7320
          classsizematters@...
          www.classsizematters.org
          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

           

          Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           


          From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of seung
          Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
          To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor

           





          leonie,

           

          Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

           

          Seung

          On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

           

          Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

          This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

          As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

          By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

          Published: June 30, 2009

          http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/01/nyregion/01control.html?ref=nyregion

          Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

          Skip to next paragraph

          Enlarge This Image

          Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

          Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany.

          The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

          At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany, Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

          But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

          Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

          “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

          Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

          “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

          Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

          Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

          Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

          “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

          As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

          The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

          The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

          Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn, the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

          In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

           

           

          Leonie Haimson
          Executive Director
          Class Size Matters
          124 Waverly Pl.
          New York, NY 10011
          212-674-7320
          classsizematters@...
          www.classsizematters.org
          http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

           

          Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

           

           

        • Ellen Bilofsky
          I called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan Blacksheer in their Communications dept. (because they thought I said I wanted a comment,
          Message 4 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
            I called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan Blacksheer in their Communications dept. (because they thought I said I wanted a comment, rather than wanted to make one). She gave me an earful about Carlo Scissura, about whom they are sending out press releases. Not just Marty's chief of staff, he has "spent a decade fighting for students & their rights to quality education" and is former VP of Community School Board 20 and former president of CEC 20." So I told her that was excellent and hoped he would support change in the system, starting with a new Chancellor.
             
            Ellen
             


            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
            Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:23 AM
            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: Classsizematters@Yahoogroups. Com; icope@yahoogroups.com; D2 parents; District 3 Parent List
            Subject: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

            People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

            Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

            Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

            Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

            Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

            Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

            SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

            People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

            At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

            Leonie Haimson
            Executive Director
            Class Size Matters
            124 Waverly Pl.
            New York , NY 10011
            212-674-7320
            classsizematters@ gmail.com
            www.classsizematter s.org
            http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

            Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


            From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
            Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
            To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor




            leonie,

            Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

            Seung

            On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

            Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

            This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

            As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

            By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

            Published: June 30, 2009

            http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

            Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

            Skip to next paragraph

            Enlarge This Image

            Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

            Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany .

            The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

            At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

            But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

            Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

            “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

            Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

            “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

            Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

            Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

            Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

            “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

            As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

            The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

            The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

            Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

            In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

            Leonie Haimson
            Executive Director
            Class Size Matters
            124 Waverly Pl.
            New York , NY 10011
            212-674-7320
            classsizematters@ gmail.com
            www.classsizematter s.org
            http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

            Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

          • lwinds@aol.com
            In a message dated 7/1/2009 11:07:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ebb@afb.net writes: called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan Blacksheer
            Message 5 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
              In a message dated 7/1/2009 11:07:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ebb@... writes:
              called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan Blacksheer in their Communications dept. (because they thought I said I wanted a comment, rather than wanted to make one). She gave me an earful about Carlo Scissura, about whom they are sending out press releases. Not just Marty's chief of staff, he has "spent a decade fighting for students & their rights to quality education" and is former VP of Community School Board 20 and former president of CEC 20." So I told her that was excellent and hoped he would support change in the system, starting with a new Chancellor.
               
              Ellen
               
              July 1, 2009


              BP MARKOWITZ CALLS ON BOARD OF EDUCATION TO RETAIN CHANCELLOR JOEL KLEIN

              "I urge the members of the Board of Education to meet today and retain Joel Klein as Chancellor, providing him the necessary authority to maintain stability in our public school system and put New York City students first. I have also asked my appointee, Carlo Scissura, to introduce a resolution calling for Chancellor Klein to be employed by the Board of Education, and to be given the authority to manage the city's schools and continue the current policies of the Department of Education for sixty (60) days. After that period, Chancellor Klein will meet with the Board to discuss the status of summer school, plans for the opening of schools in September, the current fiscal status and any other information pertinent to the oversight duties of the Board of Education. The resolution will also urge the State Senate to pass the school governance legislation that has already been duly adopted by the State Assembly."



              -30-
               
              Laurie

              "The philosophy of the classroom today
              will be the philosophy of government tomorrow."
              Abraham Lincoln
            • Tricia
              I spoke with Stringer s office. They say that the appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They
              Message 6 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
                I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.
                 
                I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.
                 
                I am on my way over there
                 
                tionnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                BB
                On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:




                People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                Leonie Haimson
                Executive Director
                Class Size Matters
                124 Waverly Pl.
                New York ,  NY  10011
                212-674-7320
                classsizematters@ gmail.com
                www.classsizematter s.org
                http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                From:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor




                leonie,

                Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                Seung

                On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                This is terribly disappointing to  Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                Published: June 30, 2009

                http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the  New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                Skip to next paragraph

                Enlarge This Image

                <image001.jpg>

                Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in  Albany .

                The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in  Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former  Hostos  Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                Marty Markowitz, the  Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until  Albany votes on the matter.

                As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York,  Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of  Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                Leonie Haimson
                Executive Director
                Class Size Matters
                124 Waverly Pl.
                New York ,  NY  10011
                212-674-7320
                classsizematters@ gmail.com
                www.classsizematter s.org
                http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!



              • dorooz@aol.com
                I am so happy to hear this. In the past he had appointed Alan Maisel who was also a former CSB22 member who fought on the PEP but was overwhelmed by the
                Message 7 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
                  I am so happy to hear this.  In the past he had appointed Alan Maisel who was also a former CSB22 member who fought on the PEP but was overwhelmed by the inertia and left.  He is one of the Assemblymen who listened to his constituents and voted against Silvers bill. 

                   
                  In a message dated 7/1/2009 11:07:04 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ebb@... writes:


                  I called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan Blacksheer in their Communications dept. (because they thought I said I wanted a comment, rather than wanted to make one). She gave me an earful about Carlo Scissura, about whom they are sending out press releases. Not just Marty's chief of staff, he has "spent a decade fighting for students & their rights to quality education" and is former VP of Community School Board 20 and former president of CEC 20." So I told her that was excellent and hoped he would support change in the system, starting with a new Chancellor.
                   
                  Ellen
                   


                  From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Leonie Haimson
                  Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:23 AM
                  To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                  Cc: Classsizematters@ Yahoogroups. Com; icope@yahoogroups. com; D2 parents; District 3 Parent List
                  Subject: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                  People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                  Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                  Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                  Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                  Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                  Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                  SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                  People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                  At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                  Leonie Haimson
                  Executive Director
                  Class Size Matters
                  124 Waverly Pl.
                  New York , NY 10011
                  212-674-7320
                  classsizematters@ gmail.com
                  www.classsizematter s.org
                  http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                  Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                  From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                  Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                  To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor




                  leonie,

                  Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                  Seung

                  On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                  Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                  This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                  As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                  By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                  Published: June 30, 2009

                  http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                  Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                  Skip to next paragraph

                  Enlarge This Image

                  Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                  Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany .

                  The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                  At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                  But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                  Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                  “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                  Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                  “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                  Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                  Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                  Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                  “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

                  As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                  The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                  The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                  Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                  In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                  Leonie Haimson
                  Executive Director
                  Class Size Matters
                  124 Waverly Pl.
                  New York , NY 10011
                  212-674-7320
                  classsizematters@ gmail.com
                  www.classsizematter s.org
                  http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                  Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                • Caroline Hall
                  I called and was put through to a voicemail.  Left a message for his aide re how disappointed I am that he has made this decision and how I can no longer in
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
                    I called and was put through to a voicemail.  Left a message for his aide re how disappointed I am that he has made this decision and how I can no longer in good conscience support him for borough president,

                    --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                    From: Leonie Haimson <leonie@...>
                    Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor
                    To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 10:37 AM

                    It has to be public by law.

                     

                    Leonie Haimson
                    Executive Director
                    Class Size Matters
                    124 Waverly Pl.
                    New York , NY 10011
                    212-674-7320
                    classsizematters@ gmail.com
                    www.classsizematter s.org
                    http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                     

                    Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                     


                    From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                    Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                    To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor

                     




                    leonie,

                     

                    Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                     

                    Seung

                    On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                     

                    Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                    This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                    As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                    By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                    Published: June 30, 2009

                    http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                    Skip to next paragraph

                    Enlarge This Image

                    Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany .

                    The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                    At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                    But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                    Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                    “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                    Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                    “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                    Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                    Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                    Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                    “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

                    As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                    The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                    The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                    Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                    In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                     

                     

                    Leonie Haimson
                    Executive Director
                    Class Size Matters
                    124 Waverly Pl.
                    New York , NY 10011
                    212-674-7320
                    classsizematters@ gmail.com
                    www.classsizematter s.org
                    http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                     

                    Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                     

                     


                  • Monica L. Ayuso
                    Answering machine in queens left message. Monica ... From:dorooz@aol.com Sent:Wed 7/1/09 11:29 am To:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com Cc:Cadet369@aol.com
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
                      Answering machine in queens left message.

                      Monica

                      --- Original Message ---
                      From:dorooz@...
                      Sent:Wed 7/1/09 11:29 am
                      To:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                      Cc:Cadet369@...
                      Subj:Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!



                      I am so happy to hear this. In the past he had appointed Alan Maisel who
                      was also a former CSB22 member who fought on the PEP but was overwhelmed by
                      the inertia and left. He is one of the Assemblymen who listened to his
                      constituents and voted against Silvers bill.





                      In a message dated 7/1/2009 11:07:04 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      ebb@... writes:





                      I called Marty, Brooklyn Boro Pres, and spoke to someone named Nan
                      Blacksheer in their Communications dept. (because they thought I said I wanted a
                      comment, rather than wanted to make one). She gave me an earful about Carlo
                      Scissura, about whom they are sending out press releases. Not just Marty's
                      chief of staff, he has "spent a decade fighting for students & their
                      rights to quality education" and is former VP of Community School Board 20 and
                      former president of CEC 20." So I told her that was excellent and hoped he
                      would support change in the system, starting with a new Chancellor.

                      Ellen



                      ____________________________________
                      From: nyceducationnews@ n nyceducationnews@<WBR> nyced On Behalf Of
                      Leonie Haimson
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:23 AM
                      To: nyceducationnews@ n
                      Cc: Classsizematters@ Classsizematters@<WBR>Yah
                      Classsizematters@<WBR>Yahoogroups. Com
                      Subject: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!





                      People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.
                      Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:
                      Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300
                      Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700
                      Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000
                      Bronx BP Diaz Jr: (718) 590-3500
                      SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.
                      People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed.
                      At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter
                      of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                      Leonie Haimson
                      Executive Director
                      Class Size Matters
                      124 Waverly Pl.
                      <ST1><ST, ,
                      212-674-7320
                      classsizematters@classsize
                      www.classsizematterwww.c
                      _http://nycpublicschhttp://nycphttp://nyhttp_
                      (blocked::http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/)
                      Please make a _tax-deductible contribution_
                      (http://www.nycharities.org/donate/c_donate.asp?CharityCode=1757) to Class Size Matters now!


                      ____________________________________

                      From: <ST1>n [mailto: [mailt [ ] On Behalf Of seung
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                      To: <ST1>n
                      Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies
                      that he will rubberstamp the Mayor







                      leonie,



                      Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can
                      anyone oblige?



                      Seung

                      On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <_leonie@..._
                      (mailto:leonie@...) > wrote:





                      Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education -
                      and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the
                      Bloomberg/Klein policies.
                      This is terribly disappointing to This is parents, who believed that he
                      was on our side.
                      As Law Expir
                    • Linda Aizer
                      I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer s office and she said the same to me. I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews. ...
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jul 1, 2009
                        I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Tricia
                        Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM
                        Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                        I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.
                         
                        I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.
                         
                        I am on my way over there
                         
                        tionnews@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                        Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                        To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                        I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                        BB
                        On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:




                        People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                        Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                        Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                        Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                        Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                        Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                        SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                        People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                        At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                        Leonie Haimson
                        Executive Director
                        Class Size Matters
                        124 Waverly Pl.
                        New York ,  NY  10011
                        212-674-7320
                        classsizematters@ gmail.com
                        www.classsizematter s.org
                        http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                        Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                        From:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                        Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                        To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor




                        leonie,

                        Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                        Seung

                        On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                        Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                        This is terribly disappointing to  Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                        As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                        By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                        Published: June 30, 2009

                        http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                        Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the  New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                        Skip to next paragraph

                        Enlarge This Image

                        <image001.jpg>

                        Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                        Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in  Albany .

                        The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                        At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in  Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                        But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                        Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                        “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                        Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former  Hostos  Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                        “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                        Marty Markowitz, the  Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                        Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                        Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                        “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until  Albany votes on the matter.

                        As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York,  Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                        The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                        The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                        Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of  Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                        In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                        Leonie Haimson
                        Executive Director
                        Class Size Matters
                        124 Waverly Pl.
                        New York ,  NY  10011
                        212-674-7320
                        classsizematters@ gmail.com
                        www.classsizematter s.org
                        http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                        Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!





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                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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                      • Ann Kjellberg
                        I think in considering Stringer s very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind: - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jul 2, 2009
                          I think in considering Stringer's very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind:

                          - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday that was originally billed as a "rally in support of mayoral control" to urge the senate to pass the assembly bill;

                          - He announced before he had even appointed a board member that he would support the continuation of Klein as chancellor, signalling a departure from even the principle of school board members' independence;

                          - He stoked the mayor's scare-tactics by saying that the end of mayoral control would be "armageddon";

                          - He neglected to use any of these opportunities to speak up for the basic principles so many of us have advocated in school governance: a greater voice for parents; more checks on the mayor's authority and more transparency and accountability; a DOE more subject to the rule of law.

                          I don't want to demonize him but I think we should remember what an important ally he could have been at this moment (as Glick, and Brennan, and Sampson, and Huntley, and others have been), and he neglected to be so.


                          On Jul 1, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Linda Aizer wrote:

                          I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Tricia
                          Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM
                          Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!


                          I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.
                           
                          I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.
                           
                          I am on my way over there
                           
                          tionnews@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                          Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                          To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                          I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                          BB
                          On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:




                          People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                          Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                          Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                          Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                          Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                          Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                          SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                          People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                          At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                          Leonie Haimson
                          Executive Director
                          Class Size Matters
                          124 Waverly Pl.
                          New York ,  NY  10011
                          212-674-7320
                          classsizematters@ gmail.com
                          www.classsizematter s.org
                          http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                          Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                          From:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                          Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                          To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor




                          leonie,

                          Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                          Seung

                          On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                          Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                          This is terribly disappointing to  Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                          As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                          By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                          Published: June 30, 2009

                          http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                          Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the  New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                          Skip to next paragraph

                          Enlarge This Image

                          <image001.jpg>

                          Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                          Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in  Albany .

                          The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                          At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in  Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                          But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                          Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                          “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                          Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former  Hostos  Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                          “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                          Marty Markowitz, the  Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                          Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                          Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                          “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until  Albany votes on the matter.

                          As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York,  Harlem community groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                          The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                          The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                          Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of  Brooklyn , the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                          In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                          Leonie Haimson
                          Executive Director
                          Class Size Matters
                          124 Waverly Pl.
                          New York ,  NY  10011
                          212-674-7320
                          classsizematters@ gmail.com
                          www.classsizematter s.org
                          http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                          Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!









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                          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
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                        • Leonie Haimson
                          Here is an excerpt of a recent Stringer press release, posted online at
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jul 2, 2009

                            Here is an excerpt of a recent Stringer press release, posted online at http://www.mbpo.org/release_details.asp?id=17

                            To deliver on this promise, Stringer proposes the following steps be taken to ensure accountability is maintained and the school system remains functioning:

                            1. Appoint the new Board of Education.  The Mayor and Borough Presidents should commit to making appointments to the Board on July 1, 2009 , with a full Board meeting to follow immediately.

                            2. Schedule an immediate vote on the retention of Joel Klein as Chancellor of the Department of Education.  To preserve stability, the Board should keep Chancellor Joel Klein in his current position, and should preserve the existing power and authority of the Chancellor.

                            3. Immediately form a committee to study how the Board can ensure that accountability and the current successes of the system can be maintained under the provisions of the previous school governance law.

                            4. Conduct other necessary Board business at its first meeting in an open and transparent manner; Immediate guidance about summer school programs should be a priority.

                            5. Communicate extensively with parents.  To preserve the confidence of parents in the operation of the City’s schools, the Board must share with parents the issues it is addressing and their resolution.

                            Nowhere is there any mention of any reservations that the BP might have about the current policies of this administration, the lack of accountability and transparency, the increased overcrowding and class sizes, the Kindergarten waitlists, the skewed data, the flawed budgetary priorities and dysfunctional capital planning processes, the way in which parental concerns are treated with disdain and contempt, the manner in which our schools have been turned into test prep factories, or how parental concerns are commonly treated with disdain and contempt by the administration.

                             Only that they must ensure that “the current successes of the system must be maintained” as well as “preserve the confidence of parents in the operation of the City’s schools.”

                            Wow!  That’s not setting a very high bar – considering how many parents have no confidence in this administration’s management of our schools and don’t see any successes – only repeated failures.

                             

                            Leonie Haimson
                            Executive Director
                            Class Size Matters
                            124 Waverly Pl.
                            New York , NY 10011
                            212-674-7320
                            classsizematters@...
                            www.classsizematters.org
                            http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

                             

                            Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                             


                            From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ann Kjellberg
                            Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 9:56 AM
                            To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Stringer, whom I like a lot

                             




                            I think in considering Stringer's very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind:

                             

                            - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday that was originally billed as a "rally in support of mayoral control" to urge the senate to pass the assembly bill;

                             

                            - He announced before he had even appointed a board member that he would support the continuation of Klein as chancellor, signalling a departure from even the principle of school board members' independence;

                             

                            - He stoked the mayor's scare-tactics by saying that the end of mayoral control would be "armageddon" ;

                             

                            - He neglected to use any of these opportunities to speak up for the basic principles so many of us have advocated in school governance: a greater voice for parents; more checks on the mayor's authority and more transparency and accountability; a DOE more subject to the rule of law.

                             

                            I don't want to demonize him but I think we should remember what an important ally he could have been at this moment (as Glick, and Brennan, and Sampson, and Huntley, and others have been), and he neglected to be so.

                             

                             

                            On Jul 1, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Linda Aizer wrote:

                             

                            I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.

                             

                             

                            ----- Original Message -----

                            From: Tricia

                            Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM

                            Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                             

                             

                            I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.

                             

                            I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.

                             

                            I am on my way over there

                             

                            tionnews@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                            Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                            To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                            I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                            BB

                            On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:



                             

                             

                            People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                            Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                            Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                            Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                            Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                            Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                            SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                            People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                            At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                            Leonie Haimson
                            Executive Director
                            Class Size Matters
                            124 Waverly Pl.
                            New York ,  NY  10011
                            212-674-7320
                            classsizematters@ gmail.com
                            www.classsizematter s.org
                            http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                            Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                            From:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of seung
                            Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                            To:  nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor





                            leonie,

                            Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                            Seung

                            On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                            Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                            This is terribly disappointing to  Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                            As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                            By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                            Published: June 30, 2009

                            http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                            Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the  New York City school system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                            Skip to next paragraph

                            Enlarge This Image

                            <image001.jpg>

                            Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                            Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in  Albany .

                            The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                            At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in  Albany , Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                            But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                            Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                            “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                            Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former  Hostos  Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                            “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”


                            (Message over 64 KB, truncated)

                          • Liat Silberman
                            I agree with Ann. I think that Stringer has shown himself to be an entirely political animal, with no backbone at all. Liat
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jul 2, 2009

                              I agree with Ann.  I think that Stringer has shown himself to be an entirely political animal,  with no backbone at all.

                               

                               

                              From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ann Kjellberg
                              Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 9:56 AM
                              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Stringer, whom I like a lot

                               




                              I think in considering Stringer's very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind:

                               

                              - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday that was originally billed as a "rally in support of mayoral control" to urge the senate to pass the assembly bill;

                               

                              - He announced before he had even appointed a board member that he would support the continuation of Klein as chancellor, signalling a departure from even the principle of school board members' independence;

                               

                              - He stoked the mayor's scare-tactics by saying that the end of mayoral control would be "armageddon";

                               

                              - He neglected to use any of these opportunities to speak up for the basic principles so many of us have advocated in school governance: a greater voice for parents; more checks on the mayor's authority and more transparency and accountability; a DOE more subject to the rule of law.

                               

                              I don't want to demonize him but I think we should remember what an important ally he could have been at this moment (as Glick, and Brennan, and Sampson, and Huntley, and others have been), and he neglected to be so.

                               

                               

                              On Jul 1, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Linda Aizer wrote:

                               

                              I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.

                               

                               

                              ----- Original Message -----

                              From: Tricia

                              Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM

                              Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                               

                               

                              I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.

                               

                              I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.

                               

                              I am on my way over there

                               

                              tionnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                              Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                              I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                              BB

                              On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:



                               

                               

                              People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                              Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                              Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                              Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                              Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                              Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                              SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                              People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                              At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                              Leonie Haimson
                              Executive Director
                              Class Size Matters
                              124 Waverly Pl.
                              New York, NY 10011
                              212-674-7320
                              classsizematters@...
                              www.classsizematters.org
                              http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

                              Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                              From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of seung
                              Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                              To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor





                              leonie,

                              Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                              Seung

                              On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                              Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                              This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                              As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                              By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                              Published: June 30, 2009

                              http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/01/nyregion/01control.html?ref=nyregion

                              Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York Cityschool system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                              Skip to next paragraph

                              Enlarge This Image

                              <image001.jpg>

                              Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                              Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany.

                              The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                              At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany, Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                              But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                              Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                              “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                              Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                              “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                              Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                              Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                              Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                              “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

                              As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlemcommunity groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                              The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                              The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                              Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn, the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                              In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                              Leonie Haimson
                              Executive Director
                              Class Size Matters
                              124 Waverly Pl.
                              New York, NY 10011
                              212-674-7320
                              classsizematters@...
                              www.classsizematters.org
                              http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/

                              Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

                               

                               

                               

                               

                               


                               


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                            • Ann Kjellberg
                              I do think we should still try to work with him. He s great in many ways. But we should hold him to account for this. ... I do think we should still try to
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jul 2, 2009
                                I do think we should still try to work with him.  He's great in many ways.  But we should hold him to account for this.

                                On Jul 2, 2009, at 1:47 PM, Liat Silberman wrote:




                                I agree with Ann.  I think that Stringer has shown himself to be an entirely political animal,  with no backbone at all.

                                 

                                 

                                From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Ann Kjellberg
                                Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 9:56 AM
                                To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Stringer, whom I like a lot

                                 




                                I think in considering Stringer's very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind:

                                 

                                - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday that was originally billed as a "rally in support of mayoral control" to urge the senate to pass the assembly bill;

                                 

                                - He announced before he had even appointed a board member that he would support the continuation of Klein as chancellor, signalling a departure from even the principle of school board members' independence;

                                 

                                - He stoked the mayor's scare-tactics by saying that the end of mayoral control would be "armageddon";

                                 

                                - He neglected to use any of these opportunities to speak up for the basic principles so many of us have advocated in school governance: a greater voice for parents; more checks on the mayor's authority and more transparency and accountability; a DOE more subject to the rule of law.

                                 

                                I don't want to demonize him but I think we should remember what an important ally he could have been at this moment (as Glick, and Brennan, and Sampson, and Huntley, and others have been), and he neglected to be so.

                                 

                                 

                                On Jul 1, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Linda Aizer wrote:

                                 

                                I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.

                                 

                                 

                                ----- Original Message -----

                                From: Tricia

                                Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM

                                Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                                 

                                 

                                I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.

                                 

                                I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.

                                 

                                I am on my way over there

                                 

                                tionnews@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                                Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                                To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                                I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                                BB

                                On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:



                                 

                                 

                                People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                                Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                                Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                                Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                                Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                                Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                                SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                                People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                                At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                                Leonie Haimson
                                Executive Director
                                Class Size Matters
                                124 Waverly Pl.
                                New York, NY 10011
                                212-674-7320
                                classsizematters@ gmail.com
                                www.classsizematter s.org
                                http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                                Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                                From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of seung
                                Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                                To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor





                                leonie,

                                Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                                Seung

                                On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                                Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                                This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                                As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                                By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                                Published: June 30, 2009

                                http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                                Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York Cityschool system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                                Skip to next paragraph

                                Enlarge This Image

                                <image001.jpg>

                                Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                                Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany.

                                The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                                At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany, Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                                But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                                Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                                “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                                Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                                “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                                Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                                Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                                Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                                “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

                                As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the

                                (Message over 64 KB, truncated)

                              • Tricia Joyce
                                I totally agree Ann, this is a long list of concerning items, especially the Klein item, totally incongrous with his Closed Out presentation last year this
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jul 2, 2009
                                  I totally agree Ann, this is a long list of concerning items, especially the Klein item, totally incongrous with his Closed Out presentation last year this time.
                                   
                                  Tricia
                                   


                                  From: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ann Kjellberg
                                  Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 4:04 PM
                                  To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Re: Stringer, whom I like a lot

                                  I do think we should still try to work with him.  He's great in many ways.  But we should hold him to account for this.


                                  On Jul 2, 2009, at 1:47 PM, Liat Silberman wrote:




                                  I agree with Ann.  I think that Stringer has shown himself to be an entirely political animal,  with no backbone at all.

                                  From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Ann Kjellberg
                                  Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 9:56 AM
                                  To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Subject: [nyceducationnews] Re: Stringer, whom I like a lot




                                  I think in considering Stringer's very sensible sounding responses we should bear a few things in mind:

                                  - He stood beside the Mayor in an event last Sunday that was originally billed as a "rally in support of mayoral control" to urge the senate to pass the assembly bill;

                                  - He announced before he had even appointed a board member that he would support the continuation of Klein as chancellor, signalling a departure from even the principle of school board members' independence;

                                  - He stoked the mayor's scare-tactics by saying that the end of mayoral control would be "armageddon" ;

                                  - He neglected to use any of these opportunities to speak up for the basic principles so many of us have advocated in school governance: a greater voice for parents; more checks on the mayor's authority and more transparency and accountability; a DOE more subject to the rule of law.

                                  I don't want to demonize him but I think we should remember what an important ally he could have been at this moment (as Glick, and Brennan, and Sampson, and Huntley, and others have been), and he neglected to be so.

                                  On Jul 1, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Linda Aizer wrote:

                                  I just spoke with Jessica Silver at Stringer's office and she said the same to me.  I also suggested that they consider communicatiing on nyceducationnews.

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  From: Tricia

                                  Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 11:21 AM

                                  Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                                  I spoke with Stringer's office. They say that the  appointment of their legal cousel is not neccessarily a permament choice, not did they fire Patrick. They love Patrick. The PEP expired with mayoral control. They appointed Jimmy to the new and not yet fully formed board of ed.for the short term because they are expecting a lot of imminent legal issues, possibly even stabs at a law to reinstate mayoral control, so in the short term they felt this to be a wise thing to do. Until there is a real board of ed. that they are certain will move forward, they aren't thinking along permanent lines.

                                  I was very clear about the fact that when and if the time comes, that we would expect Patrick to be reinstated because of his experience and all that he has done for us since he was appointed; he said they agreed that Patrick had done a great job and was an important independant voice on the board and said our views would be considered and said that the BP has no intention of abandoning us in favor of backing the mayor.

                                  I am on my way over there

                                  tionnews@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:nyceducationnews@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Beth Bernett
                                  Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:41 AM
                                  To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] borough president phone nos. ; please call now!

                                  I just called Stringer's office.  they immediately transferred me to leave a message on a 'policy' line.  I said how disappointed I was that he had chosen not to reappoint Patrick, the lone voice on the PEP that made sense and voted with his conscience for the best interests of the children of the NYC.  I also said that I would NOT be voting for Stringer anymore.

                                  BB

                                  On Jul 1, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Leonie Haimson wrote:



                                  People have asked how to contact their Borough Presidents.

                                  Here are their phone nos; they need to be called right away:

                                  Manhattan BP Stringer: (212) 669-8300

                                  Brooklyn BP Markowitz: (718) 802-3700

                                  Queens BP Marshall: (718) 286-3000

                                  Bronx BP Diaz Jr:  (718) 590-3500

                                  SI BP Molinaro: 718-816-2000.

                                  People should call and demand that Klein not be re-appointed. 

                                  At the very least, he should be put on a short term contract of a matter of months --- w/ specific terms and conditions.

                                  Leonie Haimson
                                  Executive Director
                                  Class Size Matters
                                  124 Waverly Pl.
                                  New York, NY 10011
                                  212-674-7320
                                  classsizematters@ gmail.com
                                  www.classsizematter s.org
                                  http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

                                  Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!


                                  From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of seung
                                  Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:07 AM
                                  To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Stringer removes Patrick -- and implies that he will rubberstamp the Mayor





                                  leonie,

                                  Olaiya, a cec member, is asking if anyone has stringer's phone number? Can anyone oblige?

                                  Seung

                                  On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM, Leonie Haimson <leonie@...> wrote:

                                  Stringer does not appoint Patrick as his rep on the Board of Education – and says that along w/ the SI president, he will continue to support the Bloomberg/Klein policies.

                                  This is terribly disappointing to Manhattan parents, who believed that he was on our side.

                                  As Law Expires, Bloomberg Moves to Keep Authority Over Schools

                                  By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ

                                  Published: June 30, 2009

                                  http://www.nytimes. com/2009/ 07/01/nyregion/ 01control. html?ref= nyregion

                                  Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was set to lose control of the New York Cityschool system at midnight Tuesday, but despite dire predictions of chaos from the mayor and others, it appeared that the nation’s largest school district would continue to operate largely as usual.

                                  Skip to next paragraph

                                  Enlarge This Image

                                  <image001.jpg>

                                  Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times

                                  Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Governor David A. Paterson via teleconference in Albany.

                                  The shift of power, from Mr. Bloomberg’s hands to the clutches of a yet-to-be-appointed Board of Education, came after an impasse between Republicans and Democrats in the State Senate thwarted attempts to renew mayoral control of schools, which the Legislature authorized in 2002. The law set June 30, 2009, as the day the mayor’s control would end if it was not renewed.

                                  At a videoconference with Gov. David A. Paterson in Albany, Mr. Bloomberg said the expiration of the law would mark a “nightmare flashback” to the days of the old Board of Education, which had a reputation for constant friction.

                                  But while authority over schools now technically rests with the seven-member board, the mayor is expected to retain his authority by persuading at least two borough presidents to appoint people favorable to his policies. The mayor picks two board members and each borough president names one.

                                  Mr. Bloomberg’s allies were reaching out to borough presidents on Tuesday in hopes of earning their support. The Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, and the Staten Island borough president, James P. Molinaro, have said they expected their appointees to be philosophically in tune with the mayor and to support the ideals of mayoral control. Mr. Stringer said he would appoint his legal counsel, Jimmy Yan, to the board on an interim basis as he conducted a search for a permanent member, if one was needed.

                                  “Maintaining the system has got to become paramount, not political expediency, not political gamesmanship,” Mr. Stringer said. “You can’t let education issues be driven by the courts.”

                                  Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, said he expected his appointee, the former Hostos Community College president Dolores Fernandez, to challenge the idea of retaining the schools chancellor, Joel I. Klein, and he said she might seek to overturn the mayor’s policies.

                                  “Whether it’s existing policy or future policy,” he said, “you can anticipate that will be challenged.”

                                  Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said he planned to appoint his chief of staff, Carlo A. Scissura. Mr. Stringer and Mr. Markowitz called for an immediate meeting of the reconstituted Board of Education on Wednesday.

                                  Under the old system, 32 neighborhood school boards were responsible for overseeing middle and high schools in their districts and for hiring superintendents. Since Mr. Bloomberg took control in 2002, those boards have been turned into parent councils and stripped of their power. The chancellor now appoints superintendents.

                                  Mr. Bloomberg said there was no clear way to resurrect the old system when summer school is beginning and schools are contemplating staffing and curricular options.

                                  “Every decision, from personnel decisions to policy decisions, will be subject to litigation and uncertainty,” he said. He added that he would try to keep Mr. Klein, the man he appointed chancellor, in office, because Mr. Klein is under contract. The mayor’s staff has also considered going to court to seek an extension of mayoral control until Albany votes on the matter.

                                  As the prospects of Senate action dimmed on Tuesday, supporters of mayoral control — including the City University of New York, Harlemcommunity groups and charter schools — flooded reporters’ inboxes with statements of support.

                                  The crisis in the chamber showed few signs of resolution.

                                  The Assembly passed a bill in June that retains the core elements of mayoral control but adds several limits on the mayor’s authority, like curbing his ability to close schools and approve contracts.

                                  Many Senate Democrats, however, have made clear their intention to challenge the bill and push for more parental input in education decision-making. While the Assembly’s bill most likely has enough support from Republicans and Democrats to pass, it faces the obstacle of Senator John L. Sampson of Brooklyn, the Democrats’ new leader and a critic of mayoral control, who could prevent it from being debated.

                                  In a statement, Mr. Sampson said Democrats “have real concerns which should be discussed and addressed before passage of this legislation.”

                                  Leonie Haimson
                                  Executive Director
                                  Class Size Matters
                                  124 Waverly Pl.
                                  New York, NY 10011
                                  212-674-7320
                                  classsizematters@ gmail.com
                                  www.classsizematter s.org
                                  http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot .com/

                                  Please make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!



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