Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

33239CALL SENATORS-URGENT

Expand Messages
  • Lynne Winderbaum
    Mar 1, 2011
    LIFO is a new expression that emphasizes the new teacher--"last in". In our contract it is called "seniority" which emphasizes the length of service. 

     
    PLEASE CALL TODAY. THIS IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! SEE ATTACHED DOCUMENT AS WELL FOR EXTENSIONS.

    February 25, 2011
     
    To:      Board of Directors
               Political Action Coordinators
              
    From:  Andy Pallotta
     
    RE:      STOP THE ELIMINATION OF SENIORITY RIGHTS FOR  TEACHERS
     
    URGENT!!! TAKE ACTION NOW!!!
     
    The Senate Education Committee is scheduled to vote on S.3501 (Flanagan) on Tuesday, March 1, 2011.  This legislation seeks to do away with civil service seniority rights for teachers employed in the city of New York. 


    Call your State Senator at: 1-877 255-9417 (NYS AFL-CIO ACTION LINE). When prompted, press 2 from your touch tone phone to be connected to the NYS Senate operator.  Ask the operator to connect you to your Senator’s office.


    Ask your Senator:
     
    1.    To request that this legislation be removed from the Education Committee agenda.
     
    2.    To vote NO on this anti-labor legislation if it comes up for a vote and your Senator is on the Education Committee.


    3.    To speak up against this legislation in his/her conference meetings.
     
    4.    Please call your Senator regardless of whether he or she is on the Senate Education Committee.
     
    BACKGROUND INFORMATION:
     
    ·       This legislation seeks to eliminate a fundamental and core right of labor unions.  No other union (police, fire, CSEA etc.) is being subjected to this anti-labor legislation.


    ·       If this happens in NYC it will likely happen across the entire state.
     
    ·       The provisions of this legislation drastically and critically alter the face of public education in this state by ending seniority rights for every teacher employed in the New York City school system. The proposal, under the guise of “retaining quality teachers,” would allow career educators to be dismissed from their duties without any consideration for their years of service to the education profession and end seniority rules that ensure layoffs, when absolutely necessary, happen in an impartial way.


    ·       Seniority rules governing layoffs were first adopted in the early 1900s and then subsequently revised in the 1940s and 1970s.  They were first established and then revised in direct response to abusive practices of basing layoffs on race, age, sex, religion, political affiliation, cronyism, family status, salary level or other non-objective standards.  Lawsuits in the 1970’s challenging the criteria used in layoffs lead to the State’s adoption of the current seniority law.