Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

23619RE: [nyceducationnews] Malcolm Smith at it again - Rochester - Mayoral control bill is one vote short, Senate leader says

Expand Messages
  • Lisa Donlan
    Jul 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment

      The proposed parent advisory  boards in Rochester can include the parents of  charter school students, which in NYC is not allowed by law.

      Many of the NYC Parent Commission on governance recommendations  that strove to empower and diversify the councils in NYC,  including reserving up to one seat per district for a charter school parent,  were ignored.

      Yet in Rochester:

      Parent Advisory Councils: Each City Council District will have one five-member Parent Advisory Council that will evaluate the Superintendent; review and assess educational programs; host community forums on the Superintendent’s proposed budget; host community forums on proposed school closures.

        • All members must be a parent of a RCSD or city charter school student
        • Members will be appointed by officers of Parent Teacher Associations or Parent Associations of schools in their district. They will serve a two-year term.
        • The Advisory Councils will establish two citywide subcommittees to advise the Superintendent on Special Education and English-language instruction.


      Lisa Donlan

      To: nyceducationnews@yahoogroups.com
      From: leonie@...
      Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 09:48:56 -0400
      Subject: RE: [nyceducationnews] Malcolm Smith at it again - Rochester - Mayoral control bill is one vote short, Senate leader says

       

      You can be sure that this effort is funded by DFER and the billionaire’s boys club and their hidden agenda is to radically expand charter schools w/in district buildings, which the existing school board would never support. Though I can find no mention of charter schools on their website – of course.

       

      The mayor of Rochester who has been chosen by Cuomo as his running mate said that neighborhood public schools were “also” worthy of support, since they cut down on transportation costs!!!

       

      Bill Gates, the fount of all evil, said he supports mayoral control because it makes it easier to “experiment” on public school children.

       

      Leonie Haimson
      Executive Director
      Class Size Matters
      124 Waverly Pl.
      New York, NY 10011
      212-674-7320
      classsizematters@ gmail.com
      www.classsizematter s.org
      http://nycpublicsch oolparents. blogspot. com/

      http://www.huffingt onpost.com/ leonie-haimson

       

       Make a tax-deductible contribution to Class Size Matters now!

      Subscribe to Class Size Matters news by emailing classsizematters- subscribe@ yahoogroups. com

      Subscribe to the NYC education news by emailing nyceducationnews- subscribe@ yahoogroups. com

       

       


      From: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:nyceducatio nnews@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Patrick Sullivan
      Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 7:11 AM
      To: nyceducationnews@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [nyceducationnews] Malcolm Smith at it again - Rochester - Mayoral control bill is one vote short, Senate leader says

       

       

      I've not followed this debate closely but I can't comprehend how the Senate democrats have lined up to support another case of removing the voices of parents and communities in public education.

      Here a web site that will tell you how wonderful the Rochester Panel for Educational Policy will be:

      http://www.rocheste rkidsfirst. com/content/ overview



      On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 12:22 AM, Norm <norscot@aol. com> wrote:

       

      Mayoral control bill is one vote short, Senate leader says

      Joseph Spector – Gannett Albany Bureau
      Local News – June 30, 2010 - 5:15pm

      ALBANY — Whether the state Legislature would allow Rochester’s mayor to have control over city schools was hanging in the balance today as advocates and opponents were lobbying state senators over the measure.

      The bill’s sponsor, Senate President Malcolm Smith, D-Queens, told Gannett’s Albany Bureau this afternoon that the bill is one vote short from the 32 votes needed for passage in the Senate.

      The holdout among Senate Democrats is Sen. Ruben Diaz, D-Bronx, who has opposed a mayoral control plan in New York City and said he would not support it for Rochester.

      “I don’t believe in mayoral control. I voted and I opposed the one for the City of New York and what I don’t want for the city of New York and that I believe is wrong for the city, I don’t want for any other part of the state,” Diaz said.

      Smith, however, said, “I’m still working on it” and wouldn’t rule out a vote tonight, when lawmakers are expected to hold session to vote on legislation and possibly the remainder of the 2010-11 state budget.

      Without all 32 Senate Democrats on board, supporters would need at least one Senate Republican to back the measure, and pressure was on Sen. James Alesi, R-Perinton, Monroe County, to vote yes.

      Alesi and Republican Sens. Joseph Robach and George Maziarz represent Rochester, but Robach and Maziarz were expected to vote no.

      Alesi said this afternoon he has made no final decision and, in fact, had reached out to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has gained oversight of that city’s schools and as been a major advocate of the mayoral control.

      Bloomberg and Alesi were expected to talk later today.

      But Alesi again expressed his continued concern that if the Legislature gives the Rochester mayor control of the schools, it is uncertain who the mayor would be when it takes effect next year.

      Mayor Robert Duffy, who developed the mayoral control initiative, is running for lieutenant governor with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo. So if Cuomo and Duffy win, the city would elect a new mayor.

      “I have grave concerns over who the mayor is going to be and grave concerns about destabilizing the system,” Alesi said.

      The legislation, which would make the schools a city department and put the mayor and City Council in charge, passed the state Assembly last week.

      Duffy has been heavily lobbying state senators to support the bill, including senators from New York City – some of whom voted against mayoral control for New York City. He was in Albany on Monday to meet with senators.

       

       




      Hotmail has tools for the New Busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox. Learn more.
    • Show all 5 messages in this topic