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Re: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's

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  • Mark Gensman
    And as a fan of Dr. Corn for many many years.. I can only say with certaintude that I helped to promote the band and probably also helped with the demise of
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 1, 2004
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      And as a fan of Dr. Corn for many many years.. I can only say with
      certaintude that I helped to promote the band and probably also helped with
      the demise of the acoustic band in taverns..for which I feel terrible.

      I booked Stew and the boys at the Tualatin Crawfish Festival for several
      years in the early seventies when I was the entertainment chairman. Dr. Corn
      and a group called Loose Wimmen were a hit..and we allowed dancing. Those
      were the party days...

      At the same time my rock and roll band was trying our darndest to get gigs
      (and dancing) at Frankensteins, Kens Afterglow and all the venues that
      eventually went away from acoustic music. For which I feel terrible..

      The good news is Dr. Corn is still around and still makes great music..even
      though you still can't dance to 'em..

      Masrk Gensman
      Ground Zero Sound

      >From: "James Seafeldt" <seafeldt1@...>
      >Reply-To: nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com
      >To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
      >Subject: Re: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's
      >Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2004 17:56:57 -0800
      >
      >Joe:
      >
      >I'll give you a rundown on how "Dr Corn's Electric Grass Band" came into
      >being and what drove us to plug in, as they say, back in 1978.
      >
      >As you stated we played acoustic bluegrass for the first seven years of our
      >existence, but even then we were experimenting with some country, folk, and
      >acoustic rock tunes. The reason for playing such a diverse repertoire was
      >that during that period of time the music scene was much different than it
      >is today. Until 1978 it was against the law to dance in taverns so the
      >big
      >venues of that period (Rock Creek Tavern, Frankenstein's, etc.) were
      >basically concert halls to eat, drink, and listen to a large variety of
      >music much of which was acoustic. It was heaven for the bands because
      >people
      >would actually come to listen to the music. We felt that by diversifying
      >our material we would reach a larger audience and from the large crowds we
      >would get on a weekend night I would say we succeeded. At this juncture I
      >would guess we were playing about 80% bluegrass and 20% country or
      >whatever.
      >Our philosophy (if you could call it that) was to entertain the best way we
      >could as many people as we could and play music both we and they liked.
      >
      >I should say here that we could do this because each member of those Dr,
      >Corn acoustic bands had many interests in music besides bluegrass and
      >liked
      >to experiment with different kinds of music but show taste in what we chose
      >to play.
      >
      >All this changed in 1978 when the law against dancing in taverns was
      >lifted.
      >The rock and roll bands moved in and we, and other acoustic bands, were
      >moved out. This was also the start of the urban cowboy craze. It was
      >change
      >what you were doing or you weren't going to play very much. We wanted to
      >play so we plugged in.
      >
      >Stew Dodge played the electric fiddle and electric guitar (Stew was and is
      >a
      >great rock and roll guitar player), John Hillison played electric bass,
      >Dave Brown played electric and acoustic/electic guitar, I played an Ovation
      >acoustic/eclectic guitar, and we added drums. The only things we left pure
      >acoustic were the mandolin and 5-String banjo which were miked. The rest of
      >us had amps and basically Stew mixed us from the stage. This was the one
      >thing that we would change if we were to do it over again. We would have
      >someone out front mixing for us. It's too difficult to do it yourself and
      >always get a good blend.
      >
      >The Electric Grass Band was very successful and played every type of club
      >and venue you could imagine all over the Northwest and even into
      >California.
      >We played mostly country, some country rock, and a large amount of
      >bluegrass which always went over with the country crowds. It was
      >interesting in that you could do a bluegrass song like My Little Georgia
      >Rose or Uncle Pen acoustic style and the crowd would listen and applaud,
      >but
      >when you added drums and an electric bass the folks were on their feet
      >dancing. To be honest we had a great time for the six or so years we
      >played
      >in this format and I don't think any of us (except maybe Greg) who would
      >change a thing.
      >
      >You also pointed out that during the days of the Dr. Corn's Electric Grass
      >Band we also preformed often as Dr Corn's Bluegrass Remedy for those folks
      >that wanted the acoustic band. We also played some festivals where we
      >played bluegrass on the festival stage and electric music for the dance
      >after the stage show ended. This was the best of both worlds. Since 1988
      >Dr. Corn has played only acoustic bluegrass and in it's present format is
      >probably the most traditional it has ever been
      >
      >I hope I haven't rambled on too long but the more I got into answering your
      >inquiry the more old thoughts came back. All and all Dr. Corn has enjoyed
      >33 years of making music, traveling the northwest, and trying our best to
      >entertain the people who were kind enough to come out and support us in
      >whatever music style we were playing. All in all we have had a great time.
      >
      >Thanks for asking Joe.
      >
      >Jim Seafeldt
      >
      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >From: "Joe Ross" <rossjoe@...>
      >To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2004 11:30 AM
      >Subject: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's
      >
      >
      > > --- In nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Gensman" <GZsound@h...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Well, as I said. These guys can play just about any kind of music
      > > > they want. Great pickers. I read a book years ago called "How to
      > > > make money making music" and one of the suggestions was to play all
      > > > kinds of music, just rename the band to fit the style of music.
      > >
      > > Mark, I personally wouldn't expect to see "Leftover Salmon" on many
      > > bluegrass festival bills. I believe that they probably shared the
      > > stage with Del and Earl at various Jamgrass events where electric
      > > bands like LOS are more commonly found. I see nothing wrong with that.
      > > They've probably played Telluride, Strawberry, Horning's Hideout,
      > > etc.
      > >
      > > You make a good point. If the musicians in LOS decided to form an
      > > acoustic bluegrass band and called themselves something different for
      > > identification purposes, I'd love to see them at a BG Festival. They
      > > certainly have the skills and abilities to do straight-ahead
      > > bluegrass if they want to.
      > >
      > > Here in the Northwest, Dr.Corn's Bluegrass Remedy were pioneers in
      > > this regard back in the 70s. That band was acoustic bluegrass without
      > > drums. When they went electric, they became the Dr. Corn's Electric
      > > Grass Band. I believe that drums and electric bass were part of that.
      > > Their repertoire even changed to more country covers, etc. Right, Jim
      > > and Stew?
      > >
      > > I fully respect them for keeping the two separate and for their hard
      > > work and effort to capitalize on the music market. It seemed that
      > > each group had its separate followings. I personally liked both.
      > > There are no doubt some venues thatwill hire "electric grass," but
      > > not acoustic grass. The Electric Grass Band even got gigs doing late
      > > night dances at Bluegrass Festivals.
      > >
      > > Jim and Stew, if you guys are out there, I'd be interested in your
      > > perspectives about Dr. Corn's Electric Grass Band and what worked and
      > > what didn't for you guys.
      > >
      > > All of you headin' to W'grass, be extra safe on your journeys....
      > > Later!
      > > Joe
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >

      _________________________________________________________________
      Click, drag and drop. My MSN is the simple way to design your homepage.
      http://click.atdmt.com/AVE/go/onm00200364ave/direct/01/
    • Joe Ross
      ... into being and what drove us to plug in, as they say, back in 1978. Jim, Thanks a lot for your history of Dr. Corn s and what drove your band s decision to
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 1, 2004
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        --- In nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com, "James Seafeldt" <seafeldt1@c...>
        wrote:
        > I'll give you a rundown on how "Dr Corn's Electric Grass Band" came
        into being and what drove us to plug in, as they say, back in 1978.

        Jim, Thanks a lot for your history of Dr. Corn's and what drove your
        band's decision to plug in. It was interesting to hear your
        perspectives.

        Do you have any favorite "electric grass" bands? Do you consider
        Leftover Salmon as electric grass? I guess they actually bill
        themselves as "polyethnic Cajun slamgrass," whatever that is. Ricky
        Skaggs produced some pretty fine electric grass at a few points in
        his music career.

        I am waiting anxiously to hear some reports from Wintergrass '04.
        Thanks
        Joe
      • James Seafeldt
        Joe: The Skaggs effort for me was the best of what could be called electric grass music. I haven t heard enough of Leftover Salmon to render and opinion. The
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 2, 2004
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          Joe:

          The Skaggs effort for me was the best of what could be called electric grass
          music. I haven't heard enough of Leftover Salmon to render and opinion.
          The Waybacks are another group that mixes acoustic and electric music for
          great effect and are very entertaining. For those who haven't heard them I
          heartily recommend you attend their next NW appearance.

          Jim
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Joe Ross" <rossjoe@...>
          To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 6:29 AM
          Subject: [nwbluegrass] Re: Dr. Corn's


          > --- In nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com, "James Seafeldt" <seafeldt1@c...>
          > wrote:
          > > I'll give you a rundown on how "Dr Corn's Electric Grass Band" came
          > into being and what drove us to plug in, as they say, back in 1978.
          >
          > Jim, Thanks a lot for your history of Dr. Corn's and what drove your
          > band's decision to plug in. It was interesting to hear your
          > perspectives.
          >
          > Do you have any favorite "electric grass" bands? Do you consider
          > Leftover Salmon as electric grass? I guess they actually bill
          > themselves as "polyethnic Cajun slamgrass," whatever that is. Ricky
          > Skaggs produced some pretty fine electric grass at a few points in
          > his music career.
          >
          > I am waiting anxiously to hear some reports from Wintergrass '04.
          > Thanks
          > Joe
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • James Seafeldt
          Mark: Thanks for the kind words and thoughts but no need to feel bad for what took place in the late 70 s. The public got what the public wanted and thats the
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 2, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Mark:

            Thanks for the kind words and thoughts but no need to feel bad for what took
            place in the late 70's. The public got what the public wanted and thats the
            way it always is,

            Thanks again for the past bookings.

            Jim
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Mark Gensman" <GZsound@...>
            To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 12:16 AM
            Subject: Re: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's


            > And as a fan of Dr. Corn for many many years.. I can only say with
            > certaintude that I helped to promote the band and probably also helped
            with
            > the demise of the acoustic band in taverns..for which I feel terrible.
            >
            > I booked Stew and the boys at the Tualatin Crawfish Festival for several
            > years in the early seventies when I was the entertainment chairman. Dr.
            Corn
            > and a group called Loose Wimmen were a hit..and we allowed dancing. Those
            > were the party days...
            >
            > At the same time my rock and roll band was trying our darndest to get gigs
            > (and dancing) at Frankensteins, Kens Afterglow and all the venues that
            > eventually went away from acoustic music. For which I feel terrible..
            >
            > The good news is Dr. Corn is still around and still makes great
            music..even
            > though you still can't dance to 'em..
            >
            > Masrk Gensman
            > Ground Zero Sound
            >
            > >From: "James Seafeldt" <seafeldt1@...>
            > >Reply-To: nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com
            > >To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
            > >Subject: Re: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's
            > >Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2004 17:56:57 -0800
            > >
            > >Joe:
            > >
            > >I'll give you a rundown on how "Dr Corn's Electric Grass Band" came into
            > >being and what drove us to plug in, as they say, back in 1978.
            > >
            > >As you stated we played acoustic bluegrass for the first seven years of
            our
            > >existence, but even then we were experimenting with some country, folk,
            and
            > >acoustic rock tunes. The reason for playing such a diverse repertoire
            was
            > >that during that period of time the music scene was much different than
            it
            > >is today. Until 1978 it was against the law to dance in taverns so the
            > >big
            > >venues of that period (Rock Creek Tavern, Frankenstein's, etc.) were
            > >basically concert halls to eat, drink, and listen to a large variety of
            > >music much of which was acoustic. It was heaven for the bands because
            > >people
            > >would actually come to listen to the music. We felt that by diversifying
            > >our material we would reach a larger audience and from the large crowds
            we
            > >would get on a weekend night I would say we succeeded. At this juncture
            I
            > >would guess we were playing about 80% bluegrass and 20% country or
            > >whatever.
            > >Our philosophy (if you could call it that) was to entertain the best way
            we
            > >could as many people as we could and play music both we and they liked.
            > >
            > >I should say here that we could do this because each member of those Dr,
            > >Corn acoustic bands had many interests in music besides bluegrass and
            > >liked
            > >to experiment with different kinds of music but show taste in what we
            chose
            > >to play.
            > >
            > >All this changed in 1978 when the law against dancing in taverns was
            > >lifted.
            > >The rock and roll bands moved in and we, and other acoustic bands, were
            > >moved out. This was also the start of the urban cowboy craze. It was
            > >change
            > >what you were doing or you weren't going to play very much. We wanted to
            > >play so we plugged in.
            > >
            > >Stew Dodge played the electric fiddle and electric guitar (Stew was and
            is
            > >a
            > >great rock and roll guitar player), John Hillison played electric bass,
            > >Dave Brown played electric and acoustic/electic guitar, I played an
            Ovation
            > >acoustic/eclectic guitar, and we added drums. The only things we left
            pure
            > >acoustic were the mandolin and 5-String banjo which were miked. The rest
            of
            > >us had amps and basically Stew mixed us from the stage. This was the one
            > >thing that we would change if we were to do it over again. We would have
            > >someone out front mixing for us. It's too difficult to do it yourself
            and
            > >always get a good blend.
            > >
            > >The Electric Grass Band was very successful and played every type of club
            > >and venue you could imagine all over the Northwest and even into
            > >California.
            > >We played mostly country, some country rock, and a large amount of
            > >bluegrass which always went over with the country crowds. It was
            > >interesting in that you could do a bluegrass song like My Little Georgia
            > >Rose or Uncle Pen acoustic style and the crowd would listen and applaud,
            > >but
            > >when you added drums and an electric bass the folks were on their feet
            > >dancing. To be honest we had a great time for the six or so years we
            > >played
            > >in this format and I don't think any of us (except maybe Greg) who would
            > >change a thing.
            > >
            > >You also pointed out that during the days of the Dr. Corn's Electric
            Grass
            > >Band we also preformed often as Dr Corn's Bluegrass Remedy for those
            folks
            > >that wanted the acoustic band. We also played some festivals where we
            > >played bluegrass on the festival stage and electric music for the dance
            > >after the stage show ended. This was the best of both worlds. Since 1988
            > >Dr. Corn has played only acoustic bluegrass and in it's present format is
            > >probably the most traditional it has ever been
            > >
            > >I hope I haven't rambled on too long but the more I got into answering
            your
            > >inquiry the more old thoughts came back. All and all Dr. Corn has
            enjoyed
            > >33 years of making music, traveling the northwest, and trying our best to
            > >entertain the people who were kind enough to come out and support us in
            > >whatever music style we were playing. All in all we have had a great
            time.
            > >
            > >Thanks for asking Joe.
            > >
            > >Jim Seafeldt
            > >
            > >
            > >----- Original Message -----
            > >From: "Joe Ross" <rossjoe@...>
            > >To: <nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com>
            > >Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2004 11:30 AM
            > >Subject: [nwbluegrass] Dr. Corn's
            > >
            > >
            > > > --- In nwbluegrass@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Gensman" <GZsound@h...>
            > > > wrote:
            > > > > Well, as I said. These guys can play just about any kind of music
            > > > > they want. Great pickers. I read a book years ago called "How to
            > > > > make money making music" and one of the suggestions was to play all
            > > > > kinds of music, just rename the band to fit the style of music.
            > > >
            > > > Mark, I personally wouldn't expect to see "Leftover Salmon" on many
            > > > bluegrass festival bills. I believe that they probably shared the
            > > > stage with Del and Earl at various Jamgrass events where electric
            > > > bands like LOS are more commonly found. I see nothing wrong with that.
            > > > They've probably played Telluride, Strawberry, Horning's Hideout,
            > > > etc.
            > > >
            > > > You make a good point. If the musicians in LOS decided to form an
            > > > acoustic bluegrass band and called themselves something different for
            > > > identification purposes, I'd love to see them at a BG Festival. They
            > > > certainly have the skills and abilities to do straight-ahead
            > > > bluegrass if they want to.
            > > >
            > > > Here in the Northwest, Dr.Corn's Bluegrass Remedy were pioneers in
            > > > this regard back in the 70s. That band was acoustic bluegrass without
            > > > drums. When they went electric, they became the Dr. Corn's Electric
            > > > Grass Band. I believe that drums and electric bass were part of that.
            > > > Their repertoire even changed to more country covers, etc. Right, Jim
            > > > and Stew?
            > > >
            > > > I fully respect them for keeping the two separate and for their hard
            > > > work and effort to capitalize on the music market. It seemed that
            > > > each group had its separate followings. I personally liked both.
            > > > There are no doubt some venues thatwill hire "electric grass," but
            > > > not acoustic grass. The Electric Grass Band even got gigs doing late
            > > > night dances at Bluegrass Festivals.
            > > >
            > > > Jim and Stew, if you guys are out there, I'd be interested in your
            > > > perspectives about Dr. Corn's Electric Grass Band and what worked and
            > > > what didn't for you guys.
            > > >
            > > > All of you headin' to W'grass, be extra safe on your journeys....
            > > > Later!
            > > > Joe
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            > _________________________________________________________________
            > Click, drag and drop. My MSN is the simple way to design your homepage.
            > http://click.atdmt.com/AVE/go/onm00200364ave/direct/01/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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