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Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes

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  • redhawk2853@msn.com
    Warren, the answer is a difficult one. Dogs usually get bit in the face, chest or front legs. Cold weather doesn t really protect them so much at this time of
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 26, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Warren, the answer is a difficult one. Dogs usually get bit in the face, chest or front legs. Cold weather doesn't really protect them so much at this time of the year. The rattlers have tasted Spring and are out of their dens feeding, mating and doing what snakes do. With a predominance of warm days now, they will be moving away from the home base (den). This might mean a night under a log or curled up in sun warmed rocks. They may be sluggish in the cold, but still able to strike when a wet nose goes poking around them. I'd say, if I had a dog that was well behaved and minded me and stayed VERY close, then sure... take 'em along. If not, maybe a walk (or run) around the block would be better for now. A leash would also be wise if Fido just has to go caching, and of course... they DO! BTW, the Pacific Rattler (north or south) is a subspecies of the Western Rattler not to be confused with the Western Diamondback Rattler. And yes, the babies (which are being birthed NOW) are unable to rattle until they have had their first shed and the button dries out. That is usually in the first month or two, after they have had a first meal, usually a baby mouse or lizard. Bottom line here is NEVER depend on the rattle to make noise they can be broken off, or wet inside, or sometimes those slitheries just don't feel like rattling! The babies are oviviferous (carried in womb in egg sacks and born live) and ready to bite and they can be VERY aggressive. Also, you FTF NUTS need to be extra careful as the nights become warmer... the rattlers will trade in morning or evening hunting for nighttime sojourns. We used to "road run" for rattlers at night in So Cal during April and May for research purposes at the S. D. Zoo; highly productive hunts. Ok, there, more than you ever wanted to know!! :o) Stay safe, puppies too!! Rock
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Warren Harding
      Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 8:45 PM
      To: nuts_@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
       

      Kolly Wobbels and I were out geocaching in a rattlesnake area today but it was cold.  Is it safe to let the dog run in colder weather?

      47Dad47


      From: <redhawk2853@ msn.com>
      Reply-To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
      To: "NUTS" <nuts_@yahoogroups. com>
      Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
      Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2007 20:36:48 -0800

      Hi there, Rock here. Sorry to step in on peanuthead's comments, my apologies, guy. I believe it is unlikely we would find a Western Diamond back in the upper park area (although not impossible). More likely it would be a Southern Pacific Rattler. All the rattlers in California have the distinctive diamonds on the back, just in different colors. The pigmy rattler and sidewinder of So Cal deserts would be the two exceptions.. . they have blotches. There seems to be a subspecies of the Pacific Rattler in the Sutter Buttes, too. The sad thing is alot of "rattlers" are actually Western Gopher Snakes that get killed for their mimicry (blotch like markings and beige to brownish patterns.. they may even rattle their pointy tail when approached (and sound like a rattler if they happen to be "rattling" in leaves). Rattlers are distinguishable by their broad head and dullish (not shiny) keeled scales, and of course the rattle which may or may NOT be used and also may not be within visual range. Like Thrak most of my encounters in upper park have been with rattlers (alas, they are protected unless life threatening, so no nice meals to take home) :o) , and I agree, checking out some color pictures of snakes of Nor Cal might be helpful. Truth is, once you are familiar with the rattler and spot one or two in the wild, it doesn't matter what it's called... you'll recognize it... it'll be burned into your brain!! :o) Carry a stick and thump the ground as you go and whack at logs and rocks that you need to step over. That will usually send them on their way and you'll never see them. And watch when scaling rocks... make sure you know what you are reaching for and where your feet are stepping... and go around if you can! I have plenty of herpetological reference books, if you'd like to check them too. That's my 50 cents worth, Rock
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: teampeanuthead
      Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 7:13 PM
      To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
      Subject: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
       


      I'm pretty sure the only Rattlesnake you are likely to see where you
      live is the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, so it would be wise to
      google up some images of the Western Diamondback and familiarize
      yourself. Most of the time though, unless you corner one it is going
      to be slithering away from you by the time you see it or hear it
      rattle. They will almost always avoid you if given the opportunity.

      --- In nuts_@yahoogroups. com, "Valerie" <rosesrwild@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > I had my first snake encouter in Upper Park today - it didn't rattle -
      > does that mean it definitely wasn't a rattlesnake? are there any
      > markings I can be aware of? This slitherin was guarding a cache and
      > didn't back off inspite of a shoo with a stick so I backed off
      > instead. I would like to be better prepared next time on what to look
      > for.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Valerie
      >




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    • Warren Harding
      Thanks, for the advice, Rock. Tahoe has had too many visits to the vet this last year, losing her panceras first to an unknown cause and then later almost
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 26, 2007
      • 0 Attachment

        Thanks, for the advice, Rock.  Tahoe has had too many visits to the vet this last year, losing her panceras first to an unknown cause and then later almost losing her tail at a geocaching event.  We will get a closer reign on her in rattlesnake areas, even in colder climate.  She is protected with injections of rattlesnake neutralizer, but we don't want to push it.  I am assuming that she is safe to roam when there is snow on the ground.

        Thanik you.

        Warren (47Dad47)


        From: <redhawk2853@...>
        Reply-To: nuts_@yahoogroups.com
        To: "NUTS" <nuts_@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
        Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2007 07:29:46 -0800

        Warren, the answer is a difficult one. Dogs usually get bit in the face, chest or front legs. Cold weather doesn't really protect them so much at this time of the year. The rattlers have tasted Spring and are out of their dens feeding, mating and doing what snakes do. With a predominance of warm days now, they will be moving away from the home base (den). This might mean a night under a log or curled up in sun warmed rocks. They may be sluggish in the cold, but still able to strike when a wet nose goes poking around them. I'd say, if I had a dog that was well behaved and minded me and stayed VERY close, then sure... take 'em along. If not, maybe a walk (or run) around the block would be better for now. A leash would also be wise if Fido just has to go caching, and of course... they DO! BTW, the Pacific Rattler (north or south) is a subspecies of the Western Rattler not to be confused with the Western Diamondback Rattler. And yes, the babies (which are being birthed NOW) are unable to rattle until they have had their first shed and the button dries out. That is usually in the first month or two, after they have had a first meal, usually a baby mouse or lizard. Bottom line here is NEVER depend on the rattle to make noise they can be broken off, or wet inside, or sometimes those slitheries just don't feel like rattling! The babies are oviviferous (carried in womb in egg sacks and born live) and ready to bite and they can be VERY aggressive. Also, you FTF NUTS need to be extra careful as the nights become warmer... the rattlers will trade in morning or evening hunting for nighttime sojourns. We used to "road run" for rattlers at night in So Cal during April and May for research purposes at the S. D. Zoo; highly productive hunts. Ok, there, more than you ever wanted to know!! :o) Stay safe, puppies too!! Rock
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Warren Harding
        Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 8:45 PM
        To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
        Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
         

        Kolly Wobbels and I were out geocaching in a rattlesnake area today but it was cold.  Is it safe to let the dog run in colder weather?

        47Dad47


        From: <redhawk2853@ msn.com>
        Reply-To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
        To: "NUTS" <nuts_@yahoogroups. com>
        Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
        Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2007 20:36:48 -0800

        Hi there, Rock here. Sorry to step in on peanuthead's comments, my apologies, guy. I believe it is unlikely we would find a Western Diamond back in the upper park area (although not impossible). More likely it would be a Southern Pacific Rattler. All the rattlers in California have the distinctive diamonds on the back, just in different colors. The pigmy rattler and sidewinder of So Cal deserts would be the two exceptions.. . they have blotches. There seems to be a subspecies of the Pacific Rattler in the Sutter Buttes, too. The sad thing is alot of "rattlers" are actually Western Gopher Snakes that get killed for their mimicry (blotch like markings and beige to brownish patterns.. they may even rattle their pointy tail when approached (and sound like a rattler if they happen to be "rattling" in leaves). Rattlers are distinguishable by their broad head and dullish (not shiny) keeled scales, and of course the rattle which may or may NOT be used and also may not be within visual range. Like Thrak most of my encounters in upper park have been with rattlers (alas, they are protected unless life threatening, so no nice meals to take home) :o) , and I agree, checking out some color pictures of snakes of Nor Cal might be helpful. Truth is, once you are familiar with the rattler and spot one or two in the wild, it doesn't matter what it's called... you'll recognize it... it'll be burned into your brain!! :o) Carry a stick and thump the ground as you go and whack at logs and rocks that you need to step over. That will usually send them on their way and you'll never see them. And watch when scaling rocks... make sure you know what you are reaching for and where your feet are stepping... and go around if you can! I have plenty of herpetological reference books, if you'd like to check them too. That's my 50 cents worth, Rock
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: teampeanuthead
        Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 7:13 PM
        To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
        Subject: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
         


        I'm pretty sure the only Rattlesnake you are likely to see where you
        live is the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, so it would be wise to
        google up some images of the Western Diamondback and familiarize
        yourself. Most of the time though, unless you corner one it is going
        to be slithering away from you by the time you see it or hear it
        rattle. They will almost always avoid you if given the opportunity.

        --- In nuts_@yahoogroups. com, "Valerie" <rosesrwild@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > I had my first snake encouter in Upper Park today - it didn't rattle -
        > does that mean it definitely wasn't a rattlesnake? are there any
        > markings I can be aware of? This slitherin was guarding a cache and
        > didn't back off inspite of a shoo with a stick so I backed off
        > instead. I would like to be better prepared next time on what to look
        > for.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Valerie
        >




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      • redhawk2853@msn.com
        She is safe in snow, just so there are no ice-sssssssssnakes around! :o) Forgot to mention the vaccine for dogs! WOW! Almost lost her tail at a geocaching
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 26, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          She is safe in snow, just so there are no ice-sssssssssnakes around! :o) Forgot to mention the "vaccine" for dogs!  WOW! Almost lost her tail at a geocaching event?! Now there must be a story in that one!! Sounds like she is due for a Rock&Crystal Camo Heart! Later, Rock
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Warren Harding
          Sent: Monday, March 26, 2007 10:44 AM
          To: nuts_@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
           

          Thanks, for the advice, Rock.  Tahoe has had too many visits to the vet this last year, losing her panceras first to an unknown cause and then later almost losing her tail at a geocaching event.  We will get a closer reign on her in rattlesnake areas, even in colder climate.  She is protected with injections of rattlesnake neutralizer, but we don't want to push it.  I am assuming that she is safe to roam when there is snow on the ground.

          Thanik you.

          Warren (47Dad47)


          From: <redhawk2853@ msn.com>
          Reply-To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
          To: "NUTS" <nuts_@yahoogroups. com>
          Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
          Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2007 07:29:46 -0800

          Warren, the answer is a difficult one. Dogs usually get bit in the face, chest or front legs. Cold weather doesn't really protect them so much at this time of the year. The rattlers have tasted Spring and are out of their dens feeding, mating and doing what snakes do. With a predominance of warm days now, they will be moving away from the home base (den). This might mean a night under a log or curled up in sun warmed rocks. They may be sluggish in the cold, but still able to strike when a wet nose goes poking around them. I'd say, if I had a dog that was well behaved and minded me and stayed VERY close, then sure... take 'em along. If not, maybe a walk (or run) around the block would be better for now. A leash would also be wise if Fido just has to go caching, and of course... they DO! BTW, the Pacific Rattler (north or south) is a subspecies of the Western Rattler not to be confused with the Western Diamondback Rattler. And yes, the babies (which are being birthed NOW) are unable to rattle until they have had their first shed and the button dries out. That is usually in the first month or two, after they have had a first meal, usually a baby mouse or lizard. Bottom line here is NEVER depend on the rattle to make noise they can be broken off, or wet inside, or sometimes those slitheries just don't feel like rattling! The babies are oviviferous (carried in womb in egg sacks and born live) and ready to bite and they can be VERY aggressive. Also, you FTF NUTS need to be extra careful as the nights become warmer... the rattlers will trade in morning or evening hunting for nighttime sojourns. We used to "road run" for rattlers at night in So Cal during April and May for research purposes at the S. D. Zoo; highly productive hunts. Ok, there, more than you ever wanted to know!! :o) Stay safe, puppies too!! Rock
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Warren Harding
          Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 8:45 PM
          To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
           

          Kolly Wobbels and I were out geocaching in a rattlesnake area today but it was cold.  Is it safe to let the dog run in colder weather?

          47Dad47


          From: <redhawk2853@ msn.com>
          Reply-To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
          To: "NUTS" <nuts_@yahoogroups. com>
          Subject: Re: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
          Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2007 20:36:48 -0800

          Hi there, Rock here. Sorry to step in on peanuthead's comments, my apologies, guy. I believe it is unlikely we would find a Western Diamond back in the upper park area (although not impossible). More likely it would be a Southern Pacific Rattler. All the rattlers in California have the distinctive diamonds on the back, just in different colors. The pigmy rattler and sidewinder of So Cal deserts would be the two exceptions.. . they have blotches. There seems to be a subspecies of the Pacific Rattler in the Sutter Buttes, too. The sad thing is alot of "rattlers" are actually Western Gopher Snakes that get killed for their mimicry (blotch like markings and beige to brownish patterns.. they may even rattle their pointy tail when approached (and sound like a rattler if they happen to be "rattling" in leaves). Rattlers are distinguishable by their broad head and dullish (not shiny) keeled scales, and of course the rattle which may or may NOT be used and also may not be within visual range. Like Thrak most of my encounters in upper park have been with rattlers (alas, they are protected unless life threatening, so no nice meals to take home) :o) , and I agree, checking out some color pictures of snakes of Nor Cal might be helpful. Truth is, once you are familiar with the rattler and spot one or two in the wild, it doesn't matter what it's called.. you'll recognize it... it'll be burned into your brain!! :o) Carry a stick and thump the ground as you go and whack at logs and rocks that you need to step over. That will usually send them on their way and you'll never see them. And watch when scaling rocks... make sure you know what you are reaching for and where your feet are stepping... and go around if you can! I have plenty of herpetological reference books, if you'd like to check them too. That's my 50 cents worth, Rock
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: teampeanuthead
          Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 7:13 PM
          To: nuts_@yahoogroups. com
          Subject: [NUTS] Re: Rattlesnakes
           


          I'm pretty sure the only Rattlesnake you are likely to see where you
          live is the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, so it would be wise to
          google up some images of the Western Diamondback and familiarize
          yourself. Most of the time though, unless you corner one it is going
          to be slithering away from you by the time you see it or hear it
          rattle. They will almost always avoid you if given the opportunity.

          --- In nuts_@yahoogroups. com, "Valerie" <rosesrwild@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > I had my first snake encouter in Upper Park today - it didn't rattle -
          > does that mean it definitely wasn't a rattlesnake? are there any
          > markings I can be aware of? This slitherin was guarding a cache and
          > didn't back off inspite of a shoo with a stick so I backed off
          > instead. I would like to be better prepared next time on what to look
          > for.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Valerie
          >




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          Mortgage refinance is hot 1) Rates near 30-yr lows 2) Good credit get intro-rate 4.625%*

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