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Linux Mint

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  • sisterscape
    I am experimenting with Linux Mint in Virtual Box and liking it a lot. Then I found this review (in two parts). Linux Mint, The Ubuntu That Should Have Been?
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 28, 2008
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      I am experimenting with Linux Mint in Virtual Box and liking it a lot. Then I found this review (in two parts).

      Linux Mint, The Ubuntu That Should Have Been?
      Posted Jan 23, 2008 by Rich Menga
      http://www.pcmech.com/article/linux-mint-the-ubuntu-that-should-have-been/

      Linux Mint, The Ubuntu That Should Have Been? Part 2
      Posted Jan 24, 2008 by Rich Menga
      http://www.pcmech.com/article/linux-mint-the-ubuntu-that-should-have-been-part-2/

      So far, I'm impressed. Can't wait to give Wine-Doors a try. I wonder if it 'might' make a difference in the NoteTab quirks. I'm seriously considering using Mint as my primary OS. Whaddya think? Any Mint users on this list?

      Sister
    • Lee Underwood
      The author says, Here’s what I was able to do with Mint: Configure dual monitors - and they actually worked; Play Flash animations in a web browser; Play
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 28, 2008
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        The author says, "Here’s what I was able to do with Mint: Configure dual monitors - and they actually worked; Play Flash animations in a web browser; Play DVDs; Play MP3s; In Mint I can pop up the apps with the Super key alone and I dig that.; I was able to get the Windows versions of Internet Explorer 6; Running XP inside Mint is a breeze with VirtualBox installed"

        I'm not sure if I missed something here. I'm not sure about the first but all the rest worked just fine for me in Ubuntu 7.10, and w/o going to the command line. I don't know about Wine-Doors but just curious, did you have problems with all the others in regular Ubuntu?

        Lee



        On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 14:17:00 -0700 (PDT) sisterscape <sisterscape@...> wrote:

        | I am experimenting with Linux Mint in Virtual Box and liking it a lot. Then I found this review (in two parts).
        |
        | Linux Mint, The Ubuntu That Should Have Been?
        | Posted Jan 23, 2008 by Rich Menga
        | http://www.pcmech.com/article/linux-mint-the-ubuntu-that-should-have-been/
        |
        | Linux Mint, The Ubuntu That Should Have Been? Part 2
        | Posted Jan 24, 2008 by Rich Menga
        | http://www.pcmech.com/article/linux-mint-the-ubuntu-that-should-have-been-part-2/
        |
        | So far, I'm impressed. Can't wait to give Wine-Doors a try. I wonder if it 'might' make a difference in the NoteTab quirks. I'm seriously considering using Mint as my primary OS. Whaddya think? Any Mint users on this list?
        |
        | Sister
      • sisterscape
        I installed Mint on a whim . . . now that the Olympics are over it seems like I have soooo much free time! But I digress . . . I m not unhappy with Ubuntu -
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 29, 2008
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          I installed Mint on a whim . . . now that the Olympics are over it seems like I have soooo much free time! But I digress . . .

          I'm not unhappy with Ubuntu - still running 7.10 with a Hardy kernel - but I know that I'll be needing to upgrade sooner or later. Currently, I have Hardy running in VirtualBox and there are somethings that I don't like much so I thought I'd check out other options. A friend who runs this business - http://www.fixedbylinux.com/ - swears by Mint. Some of his comments are posted below:

          At the sub-skeletal level, there isn't any difference at all. The things that distinguish Mint from Ubuntu and to my experience, make it a superior distro all reside in the application and binding coding. For the most part anyway. There have been some things broken in Ubuntu for three years, case on point is the issue with the 845/945 whitebox chipsets that we seem to get donated a lot. These are perfectly acceptable video and audio chips that come onboard the specific Intel motherboards I am speaking of.

          The second upgrade always hoses X on these boards. Always. I have kicked and screamed about it to no avail and the bad part...the "fix" is contrary and demanding. You cannot install the application that fixes the problem as a means of making the problem not happen. No, you have to let the second upgrade (known as the second upgrade bug oddly enough) break the system, then you must install the "915resolution" hack which is easily available in the main repos. Problem is, with a hosed X, that makes it tough to do. Ubuntu's cold shoulder to this problem is simple. These chipsets should all be dead within the next 5 years and the problem will go away via attrition. Meanwhile, we have thousands of new linux users hitting this snag and no real way to fix it.

          Mint fixed it a while back. It works flawlessly on these chipsets.

          Mint has also done a ton of work on improving wireless in Linux. They do not use that lame "network manager" like everyone else, they use a wireless tool called "wicd" and it absolutely rocks. The only wireless setup that I've ever found to be equal (it's actually a bit better) is Mandriva. While even Ubuntu struggles with my D-Link wireless pci adapter, Mint picked it up without any work from me. Ubuntu as well as many other distros need to "build a bridge" between the problem and solution". So, obviously your wireless does not seem to work in Ubuntu...what do you do now? How do you know WHAT to do? You don't. You dig around the menus until you get the idea to start looking in the package manager for something that might help you configure your wireless and you end up installing just about every wireless tool you can find in hope of getting wireless working. At least that's what most of the people I've talked to have done. That not only
          sucks...that is pure negligence on the part of Ubuntu. It is my understanding that the new "network manager" fixes all the problems...like telling you when you need to use an ndiswrapper or something.

          That would be nice.

          Mint has done some expanding on their system tool box...it has a central point almost like mandriva where you can come and do most any system admin task there is and it should be the shining centerpiece of the distro...it works beautifully.

          Mint has done a huge amount of work on bringing all the themes, fonts and styles up to date and added a ton of new ones to the system...lots of new choices.

          We did a "pile on" test between Ubuntu and Mint. New users see all these great apps and they go install crazy in synaptic. Eventually, this will break the system. Mint stands up way, way longer to this abuse then Ubuntu. Ubuntu quits without fanfare after two days of our "pile on" set. Mint went two weeks and never did crash...it just got r e a l s l o w

          Anyway, stability is the main improvement between the two. If you have any particular questions about how it may be better or not, let me know.


          --- On Thu, 8/28/08, Lee Underwood <leeu@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Lee Underwood <leeu@...>
          > Subject: Re: [ntb-linux] Linux Mint
          > To: ntb-linux@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, August 28, 2008, 6:43 PM
          >
          > I'm not sure if I missed something here. I'm not
          > sure about the first but all the rest worked just fine for
          > me in Ubuntu 7.10, and w/o going to the command line. I
          > don't know about Wine-Doors but just curious, did you
          > have problems with all the others in regular Ubuntu?
          >
          > Lee
          >
          >
        • Lee Underwood
          Ah, that may be a good thing. I m more of a non-technical person when it comes to the operating system. I just like one that works and doesn t make me jump
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 29, 2008
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            Ah, that may be a good thing. I'm more of a non-technical person when it comes to the operating system. I just like one that works and doesn't make me jump through hoops. The issues he and you speak of (binding, etc.) are a bit too technical for me. However, I'm all for it running better. Please keep me/us updated on this. It sounds very interesting. (I also like what Ken is doing.)

            Thanks for the clarification.

            Lee


            On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 09:04:20 -0700 (PDT) sisterscape <sisterscape@...> wrote:

            | I installed Mint on a whim . . . now that the Olympics are over it seems like I have soooo much free time! But I digress . . .
            |
            | I'm not unhappy with Ubuntu - still running 7.10 with a Hardy kernel - but I know that I'll be needing to upgrade sooner or later. Currently, I have Hardy running in VirtualBox and there are somethings that I don't like much so I thought I'd check out other options. A friend who runs this business - http://www.fixedbylinux.com/ - swears by Mint. Some of his comments are posted below:
            |
            | At the sub-skeletal level, there isn't any difference at all. The things that distinguish Mint from Ubuntu and to my experience, make it a superior distro all reside in the application and binding coding. For the most part anyway. There have been some things broken in Ubuntu for three years, case on point is the issue with the 845/945 whitebox chipsets that we seem to get donated a lot. These are perfectly acceptable video and audio chips that come onboard the specific Intel motherboards I am speaking of.
            |
            | The second upgrade always hoses X on these boards. Always. I have kicked and screamed about it to no avail and the bad part...the "fix" is contrary and demanding. You cannot install the application that fixes the problem as a means of making the problem not happen. No, you have to let the second upgrade (known as the second upgrade bug oddly enough) break the system, then you must install the "915resolution" hack which is easily available in the main repos. Problem is, with a hosed X, that makes it tough to do. Ubuntu's cold shoulder to this problem is simple. These chipsets should all be dead within the next 5 years and the problem will go away via attrition. Meanwhile, we have thousands of new linux users hitting this snag and no real way to fix it.
            |
            | Mint fixed it a while back. It works flawlessly on these chipsets.
            |
            | Mint has also done a ton of work on improving wireless in Linux. They do not use that lame "network manager" like everyone else, they use a wireless tool called "wicd" and it absolutely rocks. The only wireless setup that I've ever found to be equal (it's actually a bit better) is Mandriva. While even Ubuntu struggles with my D-Link wireless pci adapter, Mint picked it up without any work from me. Ubuntu as well as many other distros need to "build a bridge" between the problem and solution". So, obviously your wireless does not seem to work in Ubuntu...what do you do now? How do you know WHAT to do? You don't. You dig around the menus until you get the idea to start looking in the package manager for something that might help you configure your wireless and you end up installing just about every wireless tool you can find in hope of getting wireless working. At least that's what most of the people I've talked to have done. That not only
            | sucks...that is pure negligence on the part of Ubuntu. It is my understanding that the new "network manager" fixes all the problems...like telling you when you need to use an ndiswrapper or something.
            |
            | That would be nice.
            |
            | Mint has done some expanding on their system tool box...it has a central point almost like mandriva where you can come and do most any system admin task there is and it should be the shining centerpiece of the distro...it works beautifully.
            |
            | Mint has done a huge amount of work on bringing all the themes, fonts and styles up to date and added a ton of new ones to the system...lots of new choices.
            |
            | We did a "pile on" test between Ubuntu and Mint. New users see all these great apps and they go install crazy in synaptic. Eventually, this will break the system. Mint stands up way, way longer to this abuse then Ubuntu. Ubuntu quits without fanfare after two days of our "pile on" set. Mint went two weeks and never did crash...it just got r e a l s l o w
            |
            | Anyway, stability is the main improvement between the two. If you have any particular questions about how it may be better or not, let me know.
            |
            |
            | --- On Thu, 8/28/08, Lee Underwood <leeu@...> wrote:
            | >
            | > From: Lee Underwood <leeu@...>
            | > Subject: Re: [ntb-linux] Linux Mint
            | > To: ntb-linux@yahoogroups.com
            | > Date: Thursday, August 28, 2008, 6:43 PM
            | >
            | > I'm not sure if I missed something here. I'm not
            | > sure about the first but all the rest worked just fine for
            | > me in Ubuntu 7.10, and w/o going to the command line. I
            | > don't know about Wine-Doors but just curious, did you
            | > have problems with all the others in regular Ubuntu?
            | >
            | > Lee
            | >
            | >
            |
            |
            |
            |
            |
            | ------------------------------------
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