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Re: [NH] What's the best way to...

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  • Ian Ornstein
    Build it in word and from the File menu save it in HTML. Then look and see what Word did to it. HTH - IanO -
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2000
      Build it in word and from the File menu
      save it in HTML.

      Then look and see what Word did to it.

      HTH

      - IanO -
      > It seems NoteTab doesn't support a format to handle newspaper columns -
      > at least not without mega programming, so I've been told. I divided a
      > page into two parts and put a photograph in the top section. I thought
      > either I'd try scanning a three-column article into a .JPG file or I'd
      > just try to open a Word .doc file in the bottom screen. Can't I have a
      > Word .doc open automatically on demand in NoteTab Pro and is this the
      > best way to handle what I would like to do?
    • Stephen Riddle
      Hi, all, All I say is don t do the jpg. The file size would be too huge to be any fun. Columns can be easy. It depends what you want to do and what else is
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 2, 2000
        Hi, all,
        All I say is don't do the jpg. The file size would be too huge to be
        any fun.
        Columns can be easy. It depends what you want to do and what else is
        on the page.
        The following looks identical in Explorer and Netscape:

        <html>
        <body>
        (If you put any content here, the browser displays it before fiddling
        with the floated elements. This would be like a heading across the
        top.)
        <div style="float:left; width:45%;">
        <!-- The first half of the columned content here -->
        </div>
        <div style="float:right; width:45%;">
        <!-- Whatever is left here -->
        </div>
        (If there was any extra stuff here, the browser would try to squeeze
        it in between the two columns.)
        </body>
        </html>

        Written like this, the second div element would actually be
        vertically
        aligned higer than the first. That would be corrected by, once you
        have the content divvied up how you want it by adding a <br />
        element
        at the top of the second div element, or switching them around,
        that is to say it could look like this:

        <html>
        <body>
        (If you put any content here, the browser displays it before fiddling
        with the floated elements. This would be like a heading across the
        top.)
        <div style="float:right; width:45%;">
        <!-- Whatever is left here -->
        </div>
        <div style="float:left; width:45%;">
        <!-- The first half of the columned content here -->
        </div>
        (If there was any extra stuff here, the browser would try to squeeze
        it in between the two columns.)
        </body>
        </html>

        If more than one div elements have the same float style value (both
        float:right, or both float:left), then the columns would be
        horizontally abutting each other with no gutter separating them with
        the first left floated one followed in order by other left floated
        elements, then the LAST right floated element followed in reverse
        order by the other right floated elements. Both the major browsers
        have good css support for margin width, padding and (box) widths, so
        if you wanted to put the styles in a style sheet in the head or an
        external style sheet it would work.
        If a viewer were to access the document with a non css browser, they
        would see the two columns run together as one long column, so even
        though the second example would be the most natural in some ways, the
        first one with one or two <br /> elements thrown in at the top of the
        second div would actually be the best way to go.
        Happy CSSin'
        Stephen
      • Greg Chapman
        ... That s as good a way as any - if you can stand wading through all Word s redundant code. However, working through lengthy columns of text on a web site is
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 5, 2000
          > Build it in word and from the File menu
          > save it in HTML.
          >
          > Then look and see what Word did to it.

          That's as good a way as any - if you can stand wading through all Word's
          redundant code.

          However, working through lengthy columns of text on a web site is a real pain -
          All that scrolling/jumping to the top of a page to start again.

          Columns work well on paper, (perhaps even look good) but it's a silly way to do
          it on screen - IMHO!

          Greg
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