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Re: [NH] What's the best way to...

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  • melchior prisi
    Hi, The command Emmet mentioned is your text here It just works in Netscape. Besides using tables you could doit with
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 31, 2000
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      Hi,

      The command Emmet mentioned is
      <multicol cols=3> your text here </multicol>
      It just works in Netscape.

      Besides using tables you could doit with
      CSS-formating but as the two "big" browsers
      show some things different, it's difficult to
      get a satisfying result.

      About using newspaper columns for web pages
      I agree with Emmemt and Jody:
      More trouble than fun...

      Greetings
      Melchior
      --


      Jody wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Martha,
      >
      > >It seems NoteTab doesn't support a format to handle newspaper
      > >columns -at least not without mega programming, so I've been told.
      >
      > Not like what you are wanting like in Adobe.
      >
      > >Can't I have a Word .doc open automatically on demand in NoteTab
      > >Pro and is this the best way to handle what I would like to do?
      >
      > No, .doc files have binary in them which will not work in
      > NoteTab. You can go with tables, but the hard part is getting the
      > right amount of text in each column as Emmett pointed out. That
      > is why I have not messed with a script for NoteTab. You have
      > font size to consider, what if the user is set to override your
      > settings in his/her browser, what screen resolution are they
      > using, etc. If you just have a half a page to do in the three
      > columns then it is no big deal. however, if you have pages to do
      > then you either have to put them in three very long columns and
      > scroll up/down as Emmett mentioned or guess at how much screen
      > the visitors will have and keep making sets of columns so many
      > lines long. So, you would have like pages one after another and
      > the user would read three columns and then go to the next one.
      > What you end up with is a real pain for both you and the user
      > because of all the different variables.
      >
      > You can look in NoteTab's HTML Library though and it has a couple
      > table wizards in it you can play with.
      >
      > Happy HTML'n!
      > Jody
      >
      > http://www.sureword.com/notetab
      >
      > The NoteTab and Html List...
      > mailto:Ntb-html-Subscribe@...
      > mailto:Ntb-html-UnSubscribe@...


      --
      http://www.alphazwirbel.net/orp/orp.htm
    • Ian Ornstein
      Build it in word and from the File menu save it in HTML. Then look and see what Word did to it. HTH - IanO -
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2000
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        Build it in word and from the File menu
        save it in HTML.

        Then look and see what Word did to it.

        HTH

        - IanO -
        > It seems NoteTab doesn't support a format to handle newspaper columns -
        > at least not without mega programming, so I've been told. I divided a
        > page into two parts and put a photograph in the top section. I thought
        > either I'd try scanning a three-column article into a .JPG file or I'd
        > just try to open a Word .doc file in the bottom screen. Can't I have a
        > Word .doc open automatically on demand in NoteTab Pro and is this the
        > best way to handle what I would like to do?
      • Stephen Riddle
        Hi, all, All I say is don t do the jpg. The file size would be too huge to be any fun. Columns can be easy. It depends what you want to do and what else is
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 2, 2000
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          Hi, all,
          All I say is don't do the jpg. The file size would be too huge to be
          any fun.
          Columns can be easy. It depends what you want to do and what else is
          on the page.
          The following looks identical in Explorer and Netscape:

          <html>
          <body>
          (If you put any content here, the browser displays it before fiddling
          with the floated elements. This would be like a heading across the
          top.)
          <div style="float:left; width:45%;">
          <!-- The first half of the columned content here -->
          </div>
          <div style="float:right; width:45%;">
          <!-- Whatever is left here -->
          </div>
          (If there was any extra stuff here, the browser would try to squeeze
          it in between the two columns.)
          </body>
          </html>

          Written like this, the second div element would actually be
          vertically
          aligned higer than the first. That would be corrected by, once you
          have the content divvied up how you want it by adding a <br />
          element
          at the top of the second div element, or switching them around,
          that is to say it could look like this:

          <html>
          <body>
          (If you put any content here, the browser displays it before fiddling
          with the floated elements. This would be like a heading across the
          top.)
          <div style="float:right; width:45%;">
          <!-- Whatever is left here -->
          </div>
          <div style="float:left; width:45%;">
          <!-- The first half of the columned content here -->
          </div>
          (If there was any extra stuff here, the browser would try to squeeze
          it in between the two columns.)
          </body>
          </html>

          If more than one div elements have the same float style value (both
          float:right, or both float:left), then the columns would be
          horizontally abutting each other with no gutter separating them with
          the first left floated one followed in order by other left floated
          elements, then the LAST right floated element followed in reverse
          order by the other right floated elements. Both the major browsers
          have good css support for margin width, padding and (box) widths, so
          if you wanted to put the styles in a style sheet in the head or an
          external style sheet it would work.
          If a viewer were to access the document with a non css browser, they
          would see the two columns run together as one long column, so even
          though the second example would be the most natural in some ways, the
          first one with one or two <br /> elements thrown in at the top of the
          second div would actually be the best way to go.
          Happy CSSin'
          Stephen
        • Greg Chapman
          ... That s as good a way as any - if you can stand wading through all Word s redundant code. However, working through lengthy columns of text on a web site is
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 5, 2000
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            > Build it in word and from the File menu
            > save it in HTML.
            >
            > Then look and see what Word did to it.

            That's as good a way as any - if you can stand wading through all Word's
            redundant code.

            However, working through lengthy columns of text on a web site is a real pain -
            All that scrolling/jumping to the top of a page to start again.

            Columns work well on paper, (perhaps even look good) but it's a silly way to do
            it on screen - IMHO!

            Greg
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