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Differences between NoteTab Std/Light and Pro explained

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  • Eric Fookes
    Hi everyone, Recently there have been several posts questioning unexpected differences between NoteTab Std/Light and Pro. Although this has been explained
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 25, 2012
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      Hi everyone,

      Recently there have been several posts questioning "unexpected"
      differences between NoteTab Std/Light and Pro. Although this has been
      explained many times in the past, I realize this may have been quite a
      few years ago. So here's a fresh explanation on the subject. I hope you
      find useful.

      NoteTab Std/Light uses the Windows Rich-Edit input control and NoteTab
      Pro uses a third-party input control. These have very different
      characteristics.

      In 1996, the first versions of NoteTab used the Windows Rich-Edit input
      control. There was no Pro version then.

      Then in 1997, I found a third-party input control that offered many
      benefits over the Rich-Edit input control. It was extremely fast (and
      still is) as it was highly optimized with lots of ASM code. It also
      offered many other benefits that were not available in the Rich-Edit
      input control. At that time, it was by far the best third-party input
      control. That's the input control that I used to develop NoteTab Pro.

      NoteTab Pro did (and still does) have one notable disadvantage over
      NoteTab Std/Light. It only supports mono-spaced fonts. Because that was
      an issue with some users, I decided to keep both NoteTab variants.

      Nowadays there are many third-party input controls available to
      developers. Most offer advanced features that weren't available in 1997
      but are now popular with programmers. A couple of the best input
      controls are used in many competing text editors today. Did you ever
      wonder why they all have such similar capabilities?

      I can hear you ask "why doesn't Fookes Software just use one of those
      great new input controls in NoteTab?"

      The reason is simple. NoteTab is based on a lot of optimized ASM and
      fast legacy code. Unfortunately, to use today's input controls requires
      updating NoteTab's source code to support Unicode. This is a difficult
      and extremely time consuming task. As I explained in an earlier email,
      it is easier to develop a new NoteTab editor than to update the legacy
      program code.

      Why bother develop a NoteTab 7 version based on the old code? Well, it's
      a lot faster than writing a brand new editor that is as good as NoteTab.
      And I still think that NoteTab is a superb product. It may not look as
      pretty as some of the newer text editors, but you can get a lot more
      work done in NoteTab than with the competition. You'll have a hard time
      finding an editor that is as fast as NoteTab Pro and also as feature rich.

      Yes, NoteTab does have some weaknesses compared to many of the newer
      text editors. But they only really affect a small number of users. And I
      dare say these weaknesses are nothing compared to the many unique
      productivity features NoteTab offers.

      --
      Regards,

      Eric Fookes
      http://www.fookes.com/
    • Mark McLaughlin
      Well said Eric! Cheers Mark McLaughlin - 250-744-4111 Twitter: @BestColorVideo ... Best Color Video Production - Social Media - Website Design
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 25, 2012
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        Well said Eric!

        Cheers

        Mark McLaughlin - 250-744-4111 Twitter: @BestColorVideo
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        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: ntb-html@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:ntb-html@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Fookes
        > Sent: April 25, 2012 6:16 AM
        > To: notetab@yahoogroups.com; ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com;
        > ntb-html@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [NH] Differences between NoteTab Std/Light and Pro explained
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi everyone,
        >
        > Recently there have been several posts questioning "unexpected"
        > differences between NoteTab Std/Light and Pro. Although this
        > has been explained many times in the past, I realize this may
        > have been quite a few years ago. So here's a fresh
        > explanation on the subject. I hope you find useful.
        >
        > NoteTab Std/Light uses the Windows Rich-Edit input control
        > and NoteTab Pro uses a third-party input control. These have
        > very different characteristics.
        >
        > In 1996, the first versions of NoteTab used the Windows
        > Rich-Edit input control. There was no Pro version then.
        >
        > Then in 1997, I found a third-party input control that
        > offered many benefits over the Rich-Edit input control. It
        > was extremely fast (and still is) as it was highly optimized
        > with lots of ASM code. It also offered many other benefits
        > that were not available in the Rich-Edit input control. At
        > that time, it was by far the best third-party input control.
        > That's the input control that I used to develop NoteTab Pro.
        >
        > NoteTab Pro did (and still does) have one notable
        > disadvantage over NoteTab Std/Light. It only supports
        > mono-spaced fonts. Because that was an issue with some users,
        > I decided to keep both NoteTab variants.
        >
        > Nowadays there are many third-party input controls available
        > to developers. Most offer advanced features that weren't
        > available in 1997 but are now popular with programmers. A
        > couple of the best input controls are used in many competing
        > text editors today. Did you ever wonder why they all have
        > such similar capabilities?
        >
        > I can hear you ask "why doesn't Fookes Software just use one
        > of those great new input controls in NoteTab?"
        >
        > The reason is simple. NoteTab is based on a lot of optimized
        > ASM and fast legacy code. Unfortunately, to use today's input
        > controls requires updating NoteTab's source code to support
        > Unicode. This is a difficult and extremely time consuming
        > task. As I explained in an earlier email, it is easier to
        > develop a new NoteTab editor than to update the legacy program code.
        >
        > Why bother develop a NoteTab 7 version based on the old code?
        > Well, it's a lot faster than writing a brand new editor that
        > is as good as NoteTab.
        > And I still think that NoteTab is a superb product. It may
        > not look as pretty as some of the newer text editors, but you
        > can get a lot more work done in NoteTab than with the
        > competition. You'll have a hard time finding an editor that
        > is as fast as NoteTab Pro and also as feature rich.
        >
        > Yes, NoteTab does have some weaknesses compared to many of
        > the newer text editors. But they only really affect a small
        > number of users. And I dare say these weaknesses are nothing
        > compared to the many unique productivity features NoteTab offers.
        >
        > --
        > Regards,
        >
        > Eric Fookes
        > http://www.fookes.com/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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