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Re: [NH] changing the width of a table

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  • Mike Breiding
    ... At 90% I get a table which is 320px wide At 10% I get a table 140px wide ... Good point. I removed the column widths an the table code is now: _______
    Message 1 of 34 , Sep 10, 2008
      Axel Berger wrote:
      > Mike Breiding wrote:
      >
      >> I used width: 10% and it stead the same as with width: 10px.
      >> But that size is what I wanted.
      >>
      > Sorry, I don't understand that at all. Neither 10 px nor 10 % of
      > anything will take that table. What I assume you /might/ mean is 100
      > % of the left column, which looks about a quarter of the whole. If
      > so a width of 100 % (not 25 % of the whole as the table only sees
      > its own wrapper) ought to do it, or perhaps better 90 % or less with
      > centering. As Loro said, this is treated as a minimum width, the
      > content will push it to whatever it needs.
      >
      At 90% I get a table which is 320px wide
      At 10% I get a table 140px wide
      > However in CSS you can override that with {table-layout:fixed;} and
      > cut off bits of all the cell contents. I doubt this is what you
      > want.
      >
      > One more thing. I only took a cursory glance at your code. If you
      > give the column widths as percentages they have to add up to exactly
      > 100 %, seven times 15 % are 105 %. It is a bit complicated to force
      > exactly identical widths for all seven columns, in this case I would
      > not bother.
      Good point. I removed the column widths an the table code is now:
      _______
      <table summary="June 1977 calendar" style="width:10%; text-align:
      center;font: 80% 'Times New Roman',Times,serif; border: 1px solid
      #c0c0c0; margin: 10px 0 0 0">
      <tbody>
      <tr>
      <th colspan="7" style="background: lightblue none repeat scroll
      0%;padding: 3px 0 3px 0">June   1977</th>
      </tr>
      <tr>
      <td>Mo</td>
      <td>Tu</td>
      <td>We</td>
      <td>Th</td>
      <td>Fr</td>
      <td>Sa</td>
      <td>Su</td>
      __________

      The width % still confuses me.

      Thanks!
      -Mike
    • Jeff
      I m new here, Marcelo, but maybe this article will help: http://www.wellstyled.com/css-nopreload-rollovers.html This is a fairly common technique in building
      Message 34 of 34 , Oct 13, 2008
        I'm new here, Marcelo, but maybe this article will help:

        http://www.wellstyled.com/css-nopreload-rollovers.html

        This is a fairly common technique in building CSS-styled menus,
        especially.

        Jeff


        --- In ntb-html@yahoogroups.com, Marcelo de Castro Bastos
        <mcblista@...> wrote:
        >
        > Interviewed by CNN on 14/9/2008 15:16, Axel Berger told the world:
        > > Marcelo de Castro Bastos wrote:
        > >
        > >> can I "crop" it in HTML/CSS in order to display just a smaller
        > >> rectangle inside it
        > >>
        > >
        > > I'm not more than 98 % sure, but as far as I know it isn't.
        > > But if it were possible you shouldn't do it. The whole image needs
        > > to be downloaded anyway. This would be similar do scaling down in
        > > HTML - I've seen 100 by 50 thumbnails that take ages to display.
        > >
        > I fully understand the issue, and it was more of an intellectual
        > curiosity... it's not actually for a production site, I was just
        > wondering if I could pull it off without firing up an image editor.
        >
        > In this particular case, the whole image would have to be loaded anyway
        > -- it is a comic-book-like page, and I wanted to "move around" the
        > individual panels to add text comments besides each one. From the
        way I
        > understand web browsers work, they wouldn't download the image 6 times.
        > And this way, there would be the extra bonus of preserving the full
        > image (avoiding the need for a separate download to get the full
        picture).
        >
        > I'll have to look into John Zeman's iframe solution and Cary Driscoll's
        > CSS solution to see if they are applicable to this particular situation.
        >
        > The idea occurred to me after I recently read the specs for the
        > "border-image" CSS3 feature -- it works by taking parts of a image file
        > to draw borders. I thought that there might be a more general way to
        use
        > partial images, and wanted to try to figure it out...
        >
        > Marcelo
        >
        > -=-=-
        > Now...witness the power of this *FULLY ARMED AND OPERATIONAL* Tagline!
        > * TagZilla 0.066 on Seamonkey 1.1.11
        >
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