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[NH] Re: Links - underlining of

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  • Raymond Fitzgerald
    Hi Mary, ... I ve never tested it, but in a tables tutorial somewhere I read that tables don t significantly affect download times unless they re really
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 1999
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      Hi Mary,

      >With a straight list of 300 names the underlining just looks
      >superfluous and distracting - and of course in table form takes longer to
      >download.

      I've never tested it, but in a tables tutorial somewhere I read that tables
      don't significantly affect download times unless they're really complicated
      or messy.

      >Is there a better way of lining up columns of text in an orderly fashion
      >than using a table format? I have never been successful at keeping columns
      >in a straight line with my html coding.

      Can you point us to a URL or otherwise provide an example? Using a table
      this part should be no problem.

      >If I use XMP or PRE everything
      >moves around when different tags are added (ie some lines line in bold
      >print, some not etc). Is it do-able with tabs - I have never used tabs
      >with my html, I usually use spacing instead.

      I'd be interested to hear more feedback on this. I'm not aware of tabs in
      HTML and rarely need to PRE myself.

      >I am getting a real kick out of learning so many new aspects about NoteTab
      >Pro; I couldn't live without it!

      Right on! NoteTab is so incredibly rich.

      Cheers,
      Ray Fitz

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    • Mary A. Kelly
      Me again! yes! when I referred to it taking longer for a table index to download - it is of course because it does not display until the entire table is
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 1999
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        Me again! yes! when I referred to it taking longer for a table index to
        download - it is of course because it does not display until the entire
        table is downloaded. I tried to break the index up into a number of
        shorter tables - but then could not get the columns of the various tables
        to line up exactly (naturally the different cells in the various tables are
        of different size due to varied length of input - added nbsp, tried %'s
        etc). (maybe I shouldn't try to do it at 4:00 in the morning - but
        couldn't come up with a solution, so stuck with the one table for now).

        The lady I did the table for has not yet replaced her version of the index,
        but my 'test' can be seen on her site at:
        <http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Garden/6402/fgs/nescopeckindex.htm>
        She had done the index in Word Perfect, so I had to go in and add the tags
        after the fact - my first experience with really using the 'clips' -
        highlighted each bit of info and hit tr or td as needed - bingo! fantastic
        - it would have taken me 3 or 4 times as long to add in the tags using my
        old 'paste' method!

        I have learned so much more about Notetab and I have been subscribed to
        this list for only a couple of weeks - I don't know how much more
        excitement I can stand! You 'guys' are great!



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      • Jan Wilson
        Got Mary Kelly s message from Friday, July 02, 1999. I tried your table using IE5 and it loaded in just a few seconds ... that s here in Belize, so it
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 1999
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          Got Mary Kelly's message from Friday, July 02, 1999.

          I tried your table using IE5 and it loaded in just a few seconds ...
          that's here in Belize, so it shouldn't be a problem.

          If you want to try to make it faster loading in more recent browsers,
          you can try to tell IE or Netscape as much info about the table as you
          can before it starts parsing it.

          For example, with what you have:

          <table border="0">
          <tr>
          <td><b>Individual</b></td><td><b>Gen</b>  </td><td><b>Father's Name</b></td></tr>
          <tr><td></td></tr>
          <tr><td><b>A-B-C</b></td></tr>
          <tr><td></td></tr>
          <tr><td></td></tr>
          <tr><td><A href="030101.htm">Angstadt, Henry</a></td><td>3</td></tr>

          The browser reads the first row, sees three cells. The second row has
          only one cell, which leaves some ambiguity as to how the browser will
          handle it.

          So the browser MUST read the whole table to see how many rows you
          really have. Most browsers will give every row as many cells as you
          have in the row that has the most cells (assuming you aren't using
          colspan).

          Try this and see if it loads faster, looks prettier, etc.:

          <table width="70%" align="center" cols="3" cellpadding="2" border="0" >
          <tr><th width="50%">Individual</th><th width="10%">Gen</th>
          <th width="40%">Father's Name</th></tr>

          <tr><td colspan="3">A-B-C<br></td></tr>

          <tr><td><A href="030101.htm">Angstadt, Henry</a></td><td>3</td></tr>
          etc.

          There are many ways of doing it, and most variations don't matter
          much, unless you have a REALLY huge table. It is always best to test
          it in several browsers (I use IE5, Netscape 4.5, and Opera 3.5) if
          possible. I did test these modifications to your table, but since my
          changes are on localhost, it would be hard to benchmark any speed
          improvement (it loads almost instantly).

          I would also add something like this embedded style data in the <head> part:

          <style type="text/css">
          <!--
          a:link { text-decoration: "none"; }
          th { text-align: "left"; }
          -->
          </style>

          This would turn off the underlining on the links (you could add a
          one-sentence instruction at the beginning), and left-align the table
          headings (the latter works in IE5 and Netscape 4.5, they stay centered
          in Opera 3.5). Or you could use the <td><b> as a heading, as you did.
          But using the <th> tag is more in the direction of the WAI (Web
          Accessibility Initiative) to help our impaired friends use special
          readers. That's also a big advantage of using style sheets, and
          ultimately, moving to XML.

          > The lady I did the table for has not yet replaced her version of the index,
          > but my 'test' can be seen on her site at:
          > <http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Garden/6402/fgs/nescopeckindex.htm>

          **************************************************
          Jan Wilson / corocom@...
          Corozal Community College / Corozal Junior College
          Corozal Town, Belize / Central America
          Visit our Corozal page / http://www.corozal.com
          PGP key at keyservers / or at pgpkey@...
          **************************************************



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        • Jody
          This one is from Jan Wilson and the one I think you were think of Charles: Got Mary Kelly s message from Friday, July 02, 1999. I tried your table using IE5
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 18, 2000
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            This one is from Jan Wilson and the one I think you were think of Charles:

            Got Mary Kelly's message from Friday, July 02, 1999.

            I tried your table using IE5 and it loaded in just a few seconds ...
            that's here in Belize, so it shouldn't be a problem.

            If you want to try to make it faster loading in more recent browsers,
            you can try to tell IE or Netscape as much info about the table as you
            can before it starts parsing it.

            For example, with what you have:

            <table border="0">
            <tr>
            <td><b>Individual</b></td><td><b>Gen</b>  </td><td><b>Father's Name</b></td></tr>
            <tr><td></td></tr>
            <tr><td><b>A-B-C</b></td></tr>
            <tr><td></td></tr>
            <tr><td></td></tr>
            <tr><td><A href="030101.htm">Angstadt, Henry</a></td><td>3</td></tr>

            The browser reads the first row, sees three cells. The second row has
            only one cell, which leaves some ambiguity as to how the browser will
            handle it.

            So the browser MUST read the whole table to see how many rows you
            really have. Most browsers will give every row as many cells as you
            have in the row that has the most cells (assuming you aren't using
            colspan).

            Try this and see if it loads faster, looks prettier, etc.:

            <table width="70%" align="center" cols="3" cellpadding="2" border="0" >
            <tr><th width="50%">Individual</th><th width="10%">Gen</th>
            <th width="40%">Father's Name</th></tr>

            <tr><td colspan="3">A-B-C<br></td></tr>

            <tr><td><A href="030101.htm">Angstadt, Henry</a></td><td>3</td></tr>
            etc.

            There are many ways of doing it, and most variations don't matter
            much, unless you have a REALLY huge table. It is always best to test
            it in several browsers (I use IE5, Netscape 4.5, and Opera 3.5) if
            possible. I did test these modifications to your table, but since my
            changes are on localhost, it would be hard to benchmark any speed
            improvement (it loads almost instantly).

            I would also add something like this embedded style data in the <head> part:

            <style type="text/css">
            <!--
            a:link { text-decoration: "none"; }
            th { text-align: "left"; }
            -->
            </style>

            This would turn off the underlining on the links (you could add a
            one-sentence instruction at the beginning), and left-align the table
            headings (the latter works in IE5 and Netscape 4.5, they stay centered
            in Opera 3.5). Or you could use the <td><b> as a heading, as you did.
            But using the <th> tag is more in the direction of the WAI (Web
            Accessibility Initiative) to help our impaired friends use special
            readers. That's also a big advantage of using style sheets, and
            ultimately, moving to XML.

            > The lady I did the table for has not yet replaced her version of the index,
            > but my 'test' can be seen on her site at:
            > <http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Garden/6402/fgs/nescopeckindex.htm>

            Happy HTML'n!
            Jody

            http://www.sureword.com/notetab

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