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Re: [NH] auto play web pages from CD - DVD

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  • dave
    Hi autorun is the way it is free ,once you set it running straight html does the rest ,set it to use Internet Explorer as Larry has said and if you want to
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 28, 2006
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      Hi
      autorun is the way it is free ,once you set it running straight html does
      the rest ,set it to use Internet Explorer as Larry has said and if you want
      to save the site use save as .mht
      ,IE7 does this not sure about IE6 ,as you save each page to mht you will end
      with one file per page no folders ,mht saves the images in the page but you
      will have to set up the links ??
      THANKYOU DAVE M

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Mike Breiding - Morgantown WV" <mike@...>
      To: <ntb-html@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, March 27, 2006 1:56 AM
      Subject: [NH] auto play web pages from CD - DVD


      >
      > Greetings,
      >
      > Anyone have any info on auto play as it pertains to web pages.
      > I would like to copy a site to a CD and have it auto start when the CD is
      > found by the OS.
      > Same need for DVD.
      >
      > What about menus for CD and or DVDs? Never been in the territory before
      > so
      > I am clueless.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > -Mike
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > CSE HTML Validator Lite - it's free:
      > http://home.earthlink.net/~5wink/dl/cselite652.exe
      >
      > Fookes Software Home: http://www.fookes.us/redir
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Greg Chapman
      ... I understand that IE6 will autorun an HTML file, but earlier versions do not. Greg
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 28, 2006
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        > autorun is the way it is free
        ...
        > ,IE7 does this not sure about IE6

        I understand that IE6 will autorun an HTML file, but earlier versions do
        not.

        Greg
      • Marcelo de Castro Bastos
        On the last exciting episode, aired on 26/3/2006 11:56, Mike Breiding - ... Other people are suggesting ways to make the autorun feature work, and that s fine.
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 28, 2006
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          On the last exciting episode, aired on 26/3/2006 11:56, Mike Breiding -
          Morgantown WV invited the wrath of the gods by saying:
          > Greetings,
          >
          > Anyone have any info on auto play as it pertains to web pages.
          > I would like to copy a site to a CD and have it auto start when the CD is
          > found by the OS.
          > Same need for DVD.
          >
          >
          Other people are suggesting ways to make the autorun feature work, and
          that's fine. But...

          ...remember that there are *other* problems involved in running HTML
          from a disk. Even if the autorun feature does not work for some reason
          (for instance, running the CD in a non-Windows machine), I suppose you
          would like for the user to be able to click in the main HTML file and
          work from there, am I right?

          Well, there are some pitfalls in that.

          1. MHTML (.MHT) files: bad idea. Although it's a published standard,
          it's not widely supported. AFAIK, only IE and recent beta builds of
          Opera support it. There is an extension for Firefox, but you can't count
          on the user having it. Bottom line: you can't count on the user being
          able to open it.

          2. Centralized resource folders (like having just one CSS file on the
          drive root, or a folder for images). Possible but troublesome. The main
          reason being that there is no standard way to refer to the root of the
          *DRIVE* in the standard HTML/CSS syntax. You can refer to the root of
          the filesystem (a slippery concept depending on the OS your user has),
          or you can refer to a specific drive (like C: or D:), but there's no
          standard way to refer to anything equivalent to the DOS/Windows syntax
          as \images\button.gif. The way IE does it is nonstandard, and not
          supported by Firefox, for instance.
          The workaround is to NEVER use absolute paths. Use relative paths, or
          put the auxiliary (images, CSS and such) files right there in the same
          folder (which is usually bad practice, by the way), or put the styles
          inside the HTML (roughly equivalent to the former). The main trouble
          with relative paths, of course, is that if you move an HTML file to a
          different folder level, you have to remember to correct the paths.

          3. Nonstandard HTML can make your disk break badly. Same rules apply
          than for coding for the Web, roughly -- but remember that you won't be
          able to patch it after you burn the disc. So, be keen on the "best
          practices" -- standard HTML, no proprietary crap, validate everything,
          and test, test, test, test. If possible, test on Linux and Mac, with
          Safari, KDE, Opera, Firefox and IE.

          MCBastos
          -
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