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Re: [NH] URI Vs. URL

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  • Jeff Scism
    Its like counting how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. Wasn t that Ferme s description of atomic fission and critical mass ? ~~ Jeffery G. Scism,
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 13, 2005
      Its like counting how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.


      Wasn't that Ferme's description of atomic fission and "critical mass"?
      ~~

      Jeffery G. Scism, IBSSG


      13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 13 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 25
      15 18 30 15 16 16 17 11 11 19 23 17 16 17 17 38 38 13 12
    • R Shapp
      Hello Jeffrey, Here s what Bartleby s says about the angels (see below my signature). My comment wasn t meant to be scornful , but I don t plan to dote on the
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 13, 2005
        Hello Jeffrey,

        Here's what Bartleby's says about the angels (see below my signature).

        My comment wasn't meant to be "scornful", but I don't plan to dote on the
        differences among URL, URN, and URI.

        Regards,

        Ray Shapp

        ***********************************************************

        http://www.bartleby.com/59/4/howmanyangel.html

        The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. 2002.

        how many angels can stand (dance) on the head of a pin?


        Scornful description of a tedious concern with irrelevant details; an
        allusion to religious controversies in the middle ages. In fact, the medieval
        argument was over how many angels could stand on the point of a pin.
      • loro
        Looking for something else I just stumbled on this explanation. I thought it was funny. URL or URI? Although most Web authors are familiar with the acronym
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 14, 2005
          Looking for something else I just stumbled on this explanation. I thought
          it was funny.

          "URL or URI?
          Although most Web authors are familiar with the acronym URL, which stands
          for uniform resource locator, the term URI isn't as common. URI stands for
          uniform resource identifier. The primary difference is that whereas a URL
          must point to a resource on the Web, a URI does not have this restriction.
          However, URIs must be unique. An analogy would be the word "heaven." It may
          or may not have a physical location, but either way it describes a unique
          concept."
          http://www.ericmeyeroncss.com/bonus/render-mode.html

          Lotta
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