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Re: [NH] HTML-Tidy error

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  • Marcelo de Castro Bastos
    ... It s looking for a summary attribute. Summary is for tables kinda like alt is for images -- you are supposed to insert a little descriptive text
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 12, 2004
      On 12/8/2004 15:23, Jeff Scism invited the wrath of the gods by saying:

      >Warning: <table> lacks "summary" attribute
      >
      >I get this in every table created by NoteTab's wizard (html-ar clipbook)
      >
      >What specifically is HTML Tidy looking for, and how can I correct the
      >HTML Table clip to insert a "Proper" attribute?
      >
      >

      It's looking for a "summary" attribute. "Summary" is for tables kinda
      like "alt" is for images -- you are supposed to insert a little
      descriptive text there, saying what kind of data this table contains, in
      order to improve accessibility.

      For instance, a blind user using a text reader, would like to know what
      is this table about in order to decide if she would prefer to skip it
      entirely, instead of having to tab field by numbingly boring field
      trying to figure it out.

      Basic syntax is about the same as the "alt" and "title" attributes --
      just do something like this:
      <table width=50% summary="This is a fake table">
      <tr>
      <td></td>
      </tr>
      </table>

      Note that, like "alt" attributes, the lack of "summary" won't keep
      your code from validating (if it's otherwise standards-compliant, that
      is). Also, note that browsers won't render "summary" as tooltips, as
      Internet Explorer does with "alt" (which, by the way, is not
      recommended; "alt" should be used for text to be displayed INSTEAD
      of the image, such as for blind users or for people who prefer to
      disable images to speed browsing; if you want a tooltip, use "title"
      instead).

      By the way, accessibility is a very good reason to avoid using
      tables for layout. CSS does it in a much better, fluider and cleaner
      way, and doesn't get in the way of screen readers. It also works better
      with small-screen rendering agents, like cellphone and palmtop browsers.

      --
      Marcelo de Castro Bastos
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