Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [NH] client side/server side

Expand Messages
  • Don Passenger
    ... Ian, you assessment is right on here. The only thing to know if you have ssi enabled/or asp enabled is this: and have
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 6, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      > >The advantages of using javascript for boilerplate insertion are:
      > >1. that it works if you don't have ssi/php/asp/etc as a alternative
      > >2. you can preview it on your own machine (vs the others which need to be
      > >parsed on the server)
      > >
      > >The disadvantage are:
      > >1. that if javascript is disabled (which it generally isn't -- but with
      > >pop-up's some disable it) you don't get the boilerplate
      > >2. its a programming language thing that might be more confusing than a
      > >simple include
      >
      > I agree about the disadvantage. The thing about anything server-side,
      > is that you know up front if you can use it. For instance, if your
      > server allows PHP, then you know you can use PHP, and all your users
      > will be able to see it. Same with SSI. As long as SSI is allowed on
      > your server, it will always work for every user. Not everyone uses JS
      > (although it's not as much of an issue as it used to be).
      >
      > I don't think it's a JS vs. SSI thing, I think it's a client-side vs.
      > server-side thing, and I would tend more towards server-side (if I
      > knew any bloody server-side languages.) :)

      Ian, you assessment is right on here. The only thing to know if you have ssi
      enabled/or asp enabled is this:

      <!--#include file="filename.txt" -->

      and have a filename.txt (the extension may vary ... I use phmtl often for
      partial html ... or txt is fine too ... there is no difference in the file).
      So learn that one line and you know how to use ssi for file includes!
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.