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RE: [Clip] How to Open a web-page .txt file in NoteTab

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  • John Shotsky
    Thanks for the info. I had looked into many of these, and was in need of a single executable that doesn t need installation. The free version of download.zip
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 5, 2012
      Thanks for the info. I had looked into many of these, and was in need of a single executable that doesn't need
      installation. The free version of download.zip for Windows is fine for my needs. I also have HttTrack on my machine when
      I want to get whole web sites, but this is single use � I know the url, the file names, and where they go, so I can just
      issue a command to get er done.
      Regards,
      John
      RecipeTools Web Site: <http://recipetools.gotdns.com/> http://recipetools.gotdns.com/

      From: ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Art Kocsis
      Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 15:39
      To: NoteTab-Clips
      Subject: RE: [Clip] How to Open a web-page .txt file in NoteTab


      At 9/5/2012 12:52 PM, John Shotsky wrote:
      >I found a solution that works great. It is a single executable named
      >'download.exe' which is executed via a %!ShellWait command, and it does
      >the trick just fine, even including overwriting the original. No install
      >needed, no Windows rights issues. This will become a permanent part of the
      >RecipeClips system.
      >
      >Here's the command: (It changes to the target folder ahead of this)
      >^!Shellwait ^%Command% http://recipetools.gotdns.com/files/commas.txt
      >/overwrite
      >
      >Here's the location of this little gem:
      >http://noeld.com/programs.asp?cat=misc#download
      >
      >John Shotsky wrote:
      > > There are no really easy ways around this on the browser side
      > > without javascript, php, etc.

      Perhaps you had a direct link to an old offering. All I see at your URL is
      the $15 "File Downloader" - no 'download.exe'. However, the site has a
      bunch of utils that look interesting. Unfortunately, all the good ones seem
      to be paidware.

      In any case, there are lots of freeware file download apps available. Here
      is a comparison chart for nine of them (curl, snarf, wget, pavuk, fget,
      fetch, lftp, aria2 and HTTrack): http://curl.haxx.se/docs/comparison-table.html

      Two that I have tried are cURL and WGet

      cURL: http://curl.haxx.se/ [Home]
      http://curl.haxx.se/docs/manpage.html [Syntax]

      From the cURL home page:

      "curl is a command line tool for transferring data with URL
      syntax, supporting DICT, FILE, FTP, FTPS, Gopher, HTTP, HTTPS,
      IMAP, IMAPS, LDAP, LDAPS, POP3, POP3S, RTMP, RTSP, SCP, SFTP,
      SMTP, SMTPS, Telnet and TFTP. curl supports SSL certificates,
      HTTP POST, HTTP PUT, FTP uploading, HTTP form based upload,
      proxies, cookies, user+password authentication (Basic, Digest,
      NTLM, Negotiate, kerberos...), file transfer resume, proxy
      tunneling and a busload of other useful tricks."

      The most recent stable version of curl is version 7.27.0,
      released on July 27, 2012.

      cURL has an extensive [huge!!!] set of options for both input and output. I
      used it to directly load web files into NTB for further clip processing. It
      was quick and simple.

      ^!Toolbar New Document
      ^$GetOutput("^%curlPath%curl.exe ^%webURL%")$

      To get a web file and store in a local file with a specific name:

      ^!ShellWait "^%curlPath%curl" "^%webURL%" -o "^%localName%"
      [Note: not tested, stores file in current local directory]

      =================
      WGet: http://www.gnu.org/software/wget/ [Home]
      http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/wget.htm [Windows DLs]

      "GNU Wget is a free network utility to retrieve files from
      the World Wide Web using HTTP and FTP, the two most widely
      used Internet protocols. It works non-interactively, thus
      enabling work in the background, after having logged off.

      The recursive retrieval of HTML pages, as well as FTP sites
      is supported -- you can use Wget to make mirrors of archives
      and home pages, or traverse the web like a WWW robot (Wget
      understands /robots.txt).

      Wget works exceedingly well on slow or unstable connections,
      keeping getting the document until it is fully retrieved.
      Re-getting files from where it left off works on servers
      (both HTTP and FTP) that support it. Matching of wildcards
      and recursive mirroring of directories are available when
      retrieving via FTP. Both HTTP and FTP retrievals can be
      time-stamped, thus Wget can see if the remote file has
      changed since last retrieval and automatically retrieve
      the new version if it has."

      The most recent Windows version of WGet is version 1.11.4
      released on Dec 31, 2008.

      I can't remember why I chose cURL over WGet and have no usage info.

      Art



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Art Kocsis
      I can t say what your download.exe does as your link for it didn t work and you didn t post a new one. As far as your requirements, that is what cURL does. The
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 5, 2012
        I can't say what your download.exe does as your link for it didn't work and
        you didn't post a new one.

        As far as your requirements, that is what cURL does. The DL zip file
        includes a PDF manual and library DLLs to use if you want to write your own
        application. But cURL itself is a stand alone app - extract the cURL.exe
        and run it. The exe even includes a built-in help to list all its options.
        At 2.5 MB, cURL may be larger than download.exe. Since I don't have it I
        can't compare. I am curious though, and would take a look at it if you post
        a good link.

        Art

        At 9/5/2012 03:49 PM, John Shotsky wrote:
        >Thanks for the info. I had looked into many of these, and was in need of a
        >single executable that doesn't need installation. The free version of
        >download.zip for Windows is fine for my needs. I also have HttTrack on my
        >machine when I want to get whole web sites, but this is single use ­ I
        >know the url, the file names, and where they go, so I can just issue a
        >command to get er done.
        >
        >At 9/5/2012 12:52 PM, John Shotsky wrote:
        > >I found a solution that works great. It is a single executable named
        > >'download.exe' which is executed via a %!ShellWait command, and it does
        > >the trick just fine, even including overwriting the original. No install
        > >needed, no Windows rights issues. This will become a permanent part of the
        > >RecipeClips system.
        > >
        > >Here's the location of this little gem:
        > >http://noeld.com/programs.asp?cat=misc#download
        >
        >Perhaps you had a direct link to an old offering. All I see at your URL is
        >the $15 "File Downloader" - no 'download.exe'.
      • John Shotsky
        Sorry, Art, forgot the link .. Regards, John RecipeTools Web Site:
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 6, 2012
          Sorry, Art, forgot the link <http://noeld.com/programs.asp?cat=misc#download> ..

          Regards,
          John
          RecipeTools Web Site: <http://recipetools.gotdns.com/> http://recipetools.gotdns.com/

          From: ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Art Kocsis
          Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 21:20
          To: NoteTab-Clips
          Subject: RE: [Clip] How to Open a web-page .txt file in NoteTab


          I can't say what your download.exe does as your link for it didn't work and
          you didn't post a new one.

          As far as your requirements, that is what cURL does. The DL zip file
          includes a PDF manual and library DLLs to use if you want to write your own
          application. But cURL itself is a stand alone app - extract the cURL.exe
          and run it. The exe even includes a built-in help to list all its options.
          At 2.5 MB, cURL may be larger than download.exe. Since I don't have it I
          can't compare. I am curious though, and would take a look at it if you post
          a good link.

          Art

          At 9/5/2012 03:49 PM, John Shotsky wrote:
          >Thanks for the info. I had looked into many of these, and was in need of a
          >single executable that doesn't need installation. The free version of
          >download.zip for Windows is fine for my needs. I also have HttTrack on my
          >machine when I want to get whole web sites, but this is single use � I
          >know the url, the file names, and where they go, so I can just issue a
          >command to get er done.
          >
          >At 9/5/2012 12:52 PM, John Shotsky wrote:
          > >I found a solution that works great. It is a single executable named
          > >'download.exe' which is executed via a %!ShellWait command, and it does
          > >the trick just fine, even including overwriting the original. No install
          > >needed, no Windows rights issues. This will become a permanent part of the
          > >RecipeClips system.
          > >
          > >Here's the location of this little gem:
          > >http://noeld.com/programs.asp?cat=misc#download
          >
          >Perhaps you had a direct link to an old offering. All I see at your URL is
          >the $15 "File Downloader" - no 'download.exe'.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • readingril
          I ve used graburl to do this for years if it hasn t already been mentioned. I don t even remember where I got it, but the first thing I do with any new
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 6, 2012
            I've used graburl to do this for years if it hasn't already been mentioned. I don't even remember where I got it, but the first thing I do with any new installation of Notetab is put the exe in the Notetab folder.

            I just looked... the executable is 12 years old!



            --- In ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com, "John Shotsky" <jshotsky@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have a web page which has some text files that my users regularly need to download as they are updated. Because they
            > are text files, they open in the browser instead of simply downloading. Then, the user must select all, copy, paste into
            > NoteTab, and save where needed. There are no really easy ways around this on the browser side without javascript, php,
            > etc.
            >
            > I would like to bypass most of that, because I know the URL, and I know where the file is supposed to go. What I'd like
            > to do is create a set of commands that would directly open the file in NoteTab, then save as, over the top of the
            > existing file with the same name. The only part I don't know how to do is get the file into NoteTab using the command
            > line only, or by using a clip. Anyone have any ideas? The point is to not expose the browser if not necessary.
            > Here's the url of one of those files
            > http://recipetools.gotdns.com/files/commas.txt
            >
            > Failing that, I may just rename them on the web site firsts, then use NoteTab to rename them when downloaded, so they
            > won't open in the browser. But even that forces the user to choose where to save the file, which is a step I want to
            > avoid. It needs to be able to work with IE, since that's the only browser I can be sure they have. FTP works for some
            > folks, but some have routers and don't want to have to port forward to support FTP. I also want to avoid forcing my
            > users to install a client of some kind on their computers.
            > Thanks!
            > John
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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