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Re: [Clip] Clip to delete Bible books, chapters and verses

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  • Axel Berger
    ... I don t get it: a) This only deals with Matthew, your examples included many other books. b) If doing it that way, why look for Mat_ and not for ;
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
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      muahelp wrote:
      > I use this clip:
      > ^!Replace Mat_{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
      > This clip works but leave ;
      > Help me?

      I don't get it:
      a) This only deals with Matthew, your examples included many other
      books.
      b) If doing it that way, why look for "Mat_" and not for "; Mat_"?

      You've not answered my question so I can't really give good advice, but
      Jane's solution is just what I had in mind. One thing though: Hers works
      in version 4.xx.
      From NoteTab 5.0 upwards the replace string is no longer "\1" but "$1".

      I would have written Jane's version as:

      ^!Replace "^(.+?);(.+?)$" >> "$1" WRAS

      If there is exactly one and only one semicolon the results are the same.
      Jane's solution is more specific for finding the first semicolon.

      Axel
    • Don - HtmlFixIt.com
      ... Others have given a better solution. To get the ; out, you need to put it in your search string. It is either ; or ; I am not sure which without testing.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
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        > I use this clip:
        >
        > ^!Replace {Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
        >
        Others have given a better solution. To get the ; out, you need to put
        it in your search string.

        It is either ; or \; I am not sure which without testing.

        ^!Replace ;{Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA

        or

        ^!Replace \;{Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA

        But again that only does Mat_ and you have others. The regex solutions
        suggested are broader.
      • jane_sedgewick
        ... advice, but ... works ... but $1 . ... same. ... The reason I used ^([^;]+);(.*)$ instead of ^(.+?);(.+?)$ is that although the results are the same,
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
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          --- In ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com, Axel Berger <Axel-Berger@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > muahelp wrote:
          > > I use this clip:
          > > ^!Replace Mat_{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
          > > This clip works but leave ;
          > > Help me?
          >
          > I don't get it:
          > a) This only deals with Matthew, your examples included many other
          > books.
          > b) If doing it that way, why look for "Mat_" and not for "; Mat_"?
          >
          > You've not answered my question so I can't really give good
          advice, but
          > Jane's solution is just what I had in mind. One thing though: Hers
          works
          > in version 4.xx.
          > From NoteTab 5.0 upwards the replace string is no longer "\1"
          but "$1".
          >
          > I would have written Jane's version as:
          >
          > ^!Replace "^(.+?);(.+?)$" >> "$1" WRAS
          >
          > If there is exactly one and only one semicolon the results are the
          same.
          > Jane's solution is more specific for finding the first semicolon.
          >
          > Axel

          The reason I used ^([^;]+);(.*)$ instead of ^(.+?);(.+?)$ is that
          although the results are the same, using a lazy match .+? needs to
          backtrack after every letter to check a match and subsequently takes
          64 steps to match any of these lines.
          A negated class ([^;]) will do a match to the semicolon in one move
          and the greedy (.*) after the semicolon moves directly to the end,
          backtracks once to handle the end of line character. This takes only
          8 steps to obtain a match.
          This means in a big file the matches will be made much more
          efficiently, and could impact the time to process.

          Cordially,
          Jane
        • Axel Berger
          ... Jane, do you give lessons (an honest question, from that example you might well be a good teacher) and can I apply for one of your classes? I use the
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
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            jane_sedgewick wrote:
            > This takes only 8 steps to obtain a match.

            Jane, do you give lessons (an honest question, from that example you
            might well be a good teacher) and can I apply for one of your classes?

            I use the non-greedy version as a matter of course for its reliability
            and because I need not consider side effects as much as with the greedy
            version. (And thiking about side effects tends to be about 90% of the
            work in writing search and replace statements.) But I do appreciate
            that's the sloppy thinking of a bloated Microsoft programmer and it
            lacks any beauty.

            But then an engineer's solution to anything tends to be ugly to look at
            and and in defense I can say that refining a quick one-off hack for
            files of normal length is seldom worth the effort in overall time.

            Axel
          • muahelp
            ... Thanks. These clips works ok now.
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 17, 2007
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              --- In ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com, "Don - HtmlFixIt.com" <don@...> wrote:
              >
              > > I use this clip:
              > >
              > > ^!Replace {Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
              > >
              > Others have given a better solution. To get the ; out, you need to put
              > it in your search string.
              >
              > It is either ; or \; I am not sure which without testing.
              >
              > ^!Replace ;{Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
              >
              > or
              >
              > ^!Replace \;{Mat_}{\d+\:\d+\-*\d*} >> WRSA
              >
              > But again that only does Mat_ and you have others. The regex solutions
              > suggested are broader.
              >
              Thanks. These clips works ok now.
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