Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: better favourites / categories

Expand Messages
  • escalation746
    Now that I have upgraded my NoteTab Pro to the latest version let me be the first to reply to my own message. :-) I have fooled around with some configuration
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 13, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Now that I have upgraded my NoteTab Pro to the latest version let me
      be the first to reply to my own message. :-)

      I have fooled around with some configuration stuff. I can now do most
      of what I want without resorting to coding in this horrid syntax. I
      set up the Clip List to use Favourites. Now I can double-click to load
      a file and select between Categories with the pull-down list. Removing
      items from the list is also simple, using the context menu. I set up
      toolbar buttons for Add Favourites and Go To Favourites, and tweaked
      the document context menu so it too has Add Favourites.

      Now my only issue with this is that reorganising favourites between
      different categories is not as easy as cut'n'paste. Plus, it would be
      nice to have custom aliases for the long file names, something like on
      an HTML page, where the full URL is hidden behind a clickable link. In
      fact, I am big on setting up custom HTML pages to navigate my own
      local docs. If only I could get some of them to load in NoteTab rather
      than my browser, I'd be a happy camper!

      So, I'm still open to suggestions.

      -- robin
    • Alan C
      ... Doesn t an .otl (the Notetab Outline) document indexable with hyperlinks unless I m mistaken. but I think is stuck with the full, the long path_to_file (no
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 13, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        escalation746 wrote:

        >[ . . ] reorganising favourites between
        >different categories is not as easy as cut'n'paste. Plus, it would be
        >nice to have custom aliases for the long file names, something like on
        >an HTML page, where the full URL is hidden behind a clickable link. In
        >fact, I am big on setting up custom HTML pages to navigate my own
        >local docs. If only I could get some of them to load in NoteTab rather
        >than my browser, I'd be a happy camper!
        >
        >
        Doesn't an .otl (the Notetab Outline) document indexable with hyperlinks
        unless I'm mistaken.

        but I think is stuck with the full, the long path_to_file (no short
        display like html can do)
        --

        I have such an inability to create favs/categories that I'm probably
        dropping that approach in favor of . . .

        Disk search for keyword sections in files using Perl since I've almost
        learned Perl enough now to do that.

        But there's also the MS find in files utility. Also the Notetab find in
        disk files feature. And a very powerful shareware find utility that
        Jody some time ago informed me about (I'm on Linux at the moment, no MS
        Windows running).

        But the find in files might need a commented out keyword section in each
        file of which some files could do but perhaps not for all files though.

        I just saw in a Linux magazine about a Perl script named "list"

        It is an indexer for files where it lists out files and you can also add
        your own comments about each file. Once comments are added (these add
        only onto the data file for the list script). so your actual files do
        not receive any comments. But launch "list" and U have a folder listing
        of files along with your comments that address the nature of each file.
        On my agenda soon to try this and tinker with it. Perl runs on Windows
        not just Linux.

        Alan.
      • R Shapp
        Hi Robin, As Alan has said, the Outline feature of NT is very good for maintaining flat file DBs. It also has a Table of Contents feature. I use OTLs full of
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 14, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Robin,

          As Alan has said, the Outline feature of NT is very good for maintaining flat
          file DBs. It also has a Table of Contents feature. I use OTLs full of
          hyperlinks quite often. Read about Outline documents in Help.

          HTH

          Ray Shapp
        • escalation746
          ... Thanks guys! I will look this up. In the meantime I wonder why the whole baroque clip language cannot be replaced with something more powerful, readable,
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 19, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            R Shapp wrote:

            > As Alan has said, the Outline feature of NT is
            > very good for maintaining flat
            > file DBs. It also has a Table of Contents feature.
            > I use OTLs full of
            > hyperlinks quite often. Read about Outline documents in Help.

            Thanks guys! I will look this up.

            In the meantime I wonder why the whole baroque clip language cannot be
            replaced with something more powerful, readable, standard, and easily
            embeddable.

            Like Python.

            Then I could be productive!

            -- robin
          • Jody
            Hi Robin, ... Perhaps you have not used it enough and become more familiar with it to see its power. As far as readable goes, it was meant for those that don t
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 19, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Robin,

              >In the meantime I wonder why the whole baroque clip language
              >cannot be replaced with something more powerful, readable,
              >standard, and easily embeddable.

              Perhaps you have not used it enough and become more familiar with
              it to see its power. As far as readable goes, it was meant for
              those that don't know any coding to be able to learn because a
              lot of the commands and functions tell you what they do unlike
              the more common scripting codes that look like gibberish to me.
              That's not to put them down at all, just to say I can read the
              Clip Code, but not stuff like Perl, RegExp, etc.

              Now, I'm trying to recall something from many years ago, so I
              don't know if it is exactly correct, but you knowing other
              languages might be able to figure out what I am saying. To the
              best of my knowledge NoteTab is written the way it is so that you
              can mix plain text and work with plain text directly in the code
              and to my understanding the other languages don't work like that.
              It has something to do on those lines. If that makes no sense,
              let me know and I'll try to hunt down or ask Eric exactly what it
              is I am trying to recall.

              I don't know what you mean by embeddable. Embedded where? It works
              on files, text, etc. not in them.

              > Then I could be productive!

              I somehow get 1000s of hours into a 8-12 hour work day sometimes. ;)
              Daily I get probably 100s. It just depends on what I am doing.

              Happy Clip'n!
              Jody

              All Lists: http://www.fookes.us/maillist.htm
              Subscribe: mailto:ntb-Clips-Subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              UnSubscribe: mailto:ntb-Clips-UnSubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              Options: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ntb-clips
              http://www.clean-funnies.com, http://www.sojourner.us/software
            • Alan C
              ... [ . . ] ... Perl is supported. So is awk. But I don t know about Python (haven t heard that it is). I view the clips as more like, say, Qbasic (an old
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 19, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                escalation746 wrote:

                >R Shapp wrote:
                >
                >
                [ . . ]

                >> the Outline feature of NT is
                >>very good for maintaining flat
                >>file DBs. It also has a Table of Contents feature.
                >>I use OTLs full of
                >>hyperlinks quite often. Read about Outline documents in Help.
                >>
                >>
                >[ clips ]
                >replaced with something more powerful, readable, standard, and easily
                >embeddable.
                >
                >Like Python.
                >
                Perl is supported. So is awk. But I don't know about Python (haven't
                heard that it is).

                I view the clips as more like, say, Qbasic (an old language). Uses
                goto. Clips seem to at least sometimes use something that might be
                called like screen objects. For instance, cursor, position of cursor,
                certain specific selected area of text. Keeping that and the mechanics
                thereof in mind seems to at least sometimes help me.

                Getting back to favorites, it may be worth a look that

                http://www.dataomega.com/insight/index.htm

                That is meant as a compliment or to co exist with Notetab. It has links
                in favorites (I think) (I'm not a favorites person). It has can write
                your own sendto definitions (can send to (perhaps a Python and a Python
                script)). I have send to Perl and a Perl script with it. It may even
                auto reload the changes. Can sendto Notetab if want to run a clip.
                Some of this I don't all fully remember the details because I'm so busy
                and I run Linux a lot too in addition to MS Windows.

                Alan.
              • Alan C
                Alan C wrote: [ .exe, script, language engine(s) compatible with Notetab ] ... I d place my bet that it is supported (works with Notetab, that is, Python) --
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 19, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Alan C wrote:
                  [ .exe, script, language engine(s) compatible with Notetab ]

                  >But I don't know about Python (haven't
                  >heard that it is).
                  >
                  >
                  I'd place my bet that it is supported (works with Notetab, that is, Python)

                  --
                  If you need use of language engine other than Perl (with exception
                  of runawk) then must use runscript (a clip command).

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ntb-scripts/message/296
                  --

                  See that url for even more.

                  --

                  ^!Set %ntpscripshort%=^$GetShort("^$GetScriptPath$")$
                  ^!Set %myfile%=^**
                  ^!Set %myfile%=^$GetShort("^%myfile%")$
                  ^!RunScript "^$GetPerlExe$ ^1 ^%myfile%" "^%ntpscripshort%perltidy.pl"
                  ; ----<end-clip<


                  ^!Set %ntpscripshort%=^$GetShort("^$GetScriptPath$")$
                  ^!Set %myfile%=^**
                  ^!Set %myfile%=^$GetShort("^%myfile%")$
                  ^!RunScript "^$GetPerlExe$ ^1 ^%myfile%" "^%ntpscripshort%tag2para.pl"
                  ; ----<end-clip<

                  There's two clips, each calls up a different Perl script. Pay particular
                  attention to all of the getshort utilized as well as the double quotes
                  utilized
                  in the runscript lines.

                  Substitute ^$GetPerlExe$ for/with Python.exe

                  Substitute (the very right hand part that's in its own quotes) for/with
                  "path_to_python_script.py"

                  In other words, the above two clips, take note of the runscript line:
                  each line has five items, each item in the line is separated by a
                  space. Of those five items, there are two items that are Perl
                  specific. So, to go with Python, just substitute the two Perl specific
                  items for the pertinent Python items.

                  Also of note above: ^%myfile% happens to be the current focused document
                  in Notetab.

                  I think there's also an even simpler form of ^!RunScript but I'm unsure
                  of this. Also take a look in the samplecode clip library there's a Perl
                  "clip" if you will (a Perl script is contained within the clip library
                  itself take note that this Perl script is called just in a fashion
                  nearly as if it is a subroutine call, VERY similar (the same principle
                  really) as use of the ^!Clip command which calls a child (sub routine) clip.

                  I'm wondering if this method of Perl (or whatever language code other
                  than clip) inside the clip library can work with Python or yet another
                  with using the ^!RunScript command. It might. I don't remember trying it.

                  That's not too unhandy -- call it as a separate clip from within its own
                  clip library.

                  If embedded is having clip code on some lines with Python code on other
                  lines inside the same clip (which cannot do to my knowlege) then what I
                  shared above comes close, not far off.

                  Alan.
                • escalation746
                  ... Ok, thanks. At some time I will try to parse all of that ! wierdness and figure out how to get stuff running. -- robin
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 24, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Alan C wrote:

                    > If you need use of language engine other than Perl (with exception
                    > of runawk) then must use runscript (a clip command).

                    Ok, thanks. At some time I will try to parse all of that ! wierdness
                    and figure out how to get stuff running.

                    -- robin
                  • escalation746
                    ... Look at Python and it looks like pseudocode that anyone could write. And more importantly, read.It is almost immediately understandable. Having used
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 24, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Jody wrote:

                      > Perhaps you have not used it enough and become more familiar with
                      > it to see its power. As far as readable goes, it was meant for
                      > those that don't know any coding to be able to learn because a
                      > lot of the commands and functions tell you what they do unlike
                      > the more common scripting codes that look like gibberish to me.

                      Look at Python and it looks like pseudocode that anyone could write.
                      And more importantly, read.It is almost immediately understandable.
                      Having used programming languages for 25 years I can say I certainly
                      do not want to learn another one unless it is at least as readable as
                      Python.

                      I am sure the clip language can be used to do many things. But it is
                      complex beyond necessity, and I am lazy. All my energy I devote to
                      other people. Devoting energy to computers just seems a waste. :-)

                      > I don't know what you mean by embeddable. Embedded where? It works
                      > on files, text, etc. not in them.

                      I just mean that it is easy to embed Python into other programs, like
                      NoteTab. So rather than invent some other new scripting language one
                      can use an existing superior tool.

                      -- robin
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.