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Re: [Clip] word count

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  • hsavage
    ... Ed, If I understand what you said you are changing tabs to something else before you run the clip. Don t change anything, the tabs must be in place for the
    Message 1 of 18 , May 2 6:59 PM
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      Ed Brown wrote:

      > However, when I run the clip from hsavage on
      > the large list I get a syntax error in line 11.
      > And I get this if I use the Text Statistics and
      > then Format Statistics even after I changed the tabs.

      > WordFrequency
      >
      > gegenschein4
      > bract4
      > .4

      Ed,

      If I understand what you said you are changing tabs to something else
      before you run the clip.

      Don't change anything, the tabs must be in place for the clip to work.

      The only thing that gave me an error a line with a first word that was
      too long.

      That could be worked around, I think, by adding the line,
      ^!SetErrorLabel NEXT, near the top of the clip.

      hrs
    • Ed Brown
      ... before you run the clip. ... too long. ... ^!SetErrorLabel NEXT, near the top of the clip. I would like to put the tabs back in place, I set them larger.
      Message 2 of 18 , May 2 9:36 PM
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        hrs wrote:

        >Ed,

        >If I understand what you said you are changing tabs to something else
        before you run the clip.

        >Don't change anything, the tabs must be in place for the clip to work.

        >The only thing that gave me an error a line with a first word that was
        too long.

        >That could be worked around, I think, by adding the line,
        ^!SetErrorLabel NEXT, near the top of the clip.

        I would like to put the tabs back in place, I set them larger. But now I do not see a way to reset them to the original settings. I will try the clip line near the top and see what happens.
        E

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      • Larry Thomas
        Hi Ed, ... do not see a way to reset them to the original settings. I will try the clip line near the top and see what happens. There is another way with clips
        Message 3 of 18 , May 3 4:29 AM
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          Hi Ed,

          At 11:36 PM 5/2/04 -0500, you wrote:
          >before you run the clip.
          >
          >>Don't change anything, the tabs must be in place for the clip to work.
          >
          >>The only thing that gave me an error a line with a first word that was
          >too long.
          >
          >>That could be worked around, I think, by adding the line,
          >^!SetErrorLabel NEXT, near the top of the clip.
          >
          >I would like to put the tabs back in place, I set them larger. But now I
          do not see a way to reset them to the original settings. I will try the
          clip line near the top and see what happens.

          There is another way with clips using ^!Keyboard commands to set and reset
          tabs. You do this manually from the menu bar on the current document only
          by selecting Document/Properties and then setting the tab size from there.
          The clip commands would be:

          ______[Copy below this line]_______
          H="Set Tab Size to 35"
          ^!Keyboard Alt+D P &100 Alt+S #35# Enter

          H="Restore Default Tab Size"
          ^!Keyboard Alt+D P &100 Alt+S Delete Enter
          _____[Copy above this line]______
          | right click over the clipbook |
          | and choose "Add from Clipboard" |
          ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

          You might have to change the &100 delay to a different number depending on
          your computer's setup speed.

          Regards,

          Larry
          lrt@... e¿ê
        • Larry Thomas
          Hi Ed, This clip combines with John s clip and it does the whole thing. It runs text statistics on the current open document. It copies the advanced page to
          Message 4 of 18 , May 3 5:02 AM
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            Hi Ed,

            This clip combines with John's clip and it does the whole thing. It runs
            text statistics on the current open document. It copies the advanced page
            to the clipboard and then pastes it to a new document. It then runs John's
            replace clip and deletes the percent column. It then sets the tab size to
            35 and replaces the tabs with spaces. And finally, it restores the tab
            size to the default setting.

            You can modify it to suit your tastes.

            ______[Copy below this line]_______
            H="Get Text Statistics"
            ;lrt@... e¿ê
            ;05/03/2004, 06:56:39 AM
            ^!Keyboard Alt+T S M Ctrl+A &200 Alt+C &200 Shift+Ctrl+V Ctrl+Home
            ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS
            ;
            ;----------------------[begin long line]---------------------------
            ^!Keyboard Alt+D P &100 Alt+S #35# Enter &200 Alt+M S B Ctrl+Home &200
            Alt+D P &100 Alt+S Delete Enter
            ;-----------------------[end long line]----------------------------
            ;
            _____[Copy above this line]______
            | right click over the clipbook |
            | and choose "Add from Clipboard" |
            ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

            Be sure to restore the long line in the clip before you try to use it.

            Regards,

            Larry
            lrt@... e¿ê
          • Ed Brown
            Works exactly as advertised. Great. Now I have a question. The second line is exactly the same as the first clip. ^!Replace {^.*} t[0-9]+ .[0-9]+$ 1
            Message 5 of 18 , May 3 8:59 AM
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              Works exactly as advertised. Great.

              Now I have a question. The second line is exactly the same as the first clip.
              ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS
              Does this mean to replace the order of the words in the list with the ones used most, the words used second most, etc. and that is why the first [0-9]? IF so what does {^.*} mean or I guess what action is perfomed by this. Then we have \t . what does this do for us? That is followed by the first [0-9]. What does the +\. do? then we have the second [0-9]+S Altogether at this point we have this equation.
              ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$"
              With the part after "Replace space" enclosed in quotation marks. This followed with >> "\1" AIWRS . Would you explain how this complete clip works in detail? Or is this too rudimentary? I have been pouring over the clip help for several weeks and so far it makes little or no sense to me. How did you know to use "Replace" instead of "List" as in "list the following words in this order etc."? Or why not "Get" the words listed most often in numerical order, etc.? I would like to see a beginners clip class in which we began with writing some simple clips and branch off into the student writing a few simple clips and then advance to the next level with using several different commands, gradually increasing in difficult with an instructor to catch our mistakes and show us why we made those errors.

              I see many clips with multiple lines beginning ^!Set. What are we setting in those lines. Why use Set? If this is too basic to be answered here that is OK. I understand I am just trying to learn the ABC's and asking a Doctor of English to teach me the ABC's. :-) After all you cannot build a word until you know the ABC's and you cannot make a sentence until you have a vocabulary of words and neither can I write much of a clip until I understand what each symbol means and what it does and then build a vocabulary of clip parts and actions. Does this make any sense at all?
              Ed


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Larry Thomas
              To: ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, May 03, 2004 7:02 AM
              Subject: Re: [Clip] word count



              Hi Ed,

              This clip combines with John's clip and it does the whole thing. It runs
              text statistics on the current open document. It copies the advanced page
              to the clipboard and then pastes it to a new document. It then runs John's
              replace clip and deletes the percent column. It then sets the tab size to
              35 and replaces the tabs with spaces. And finally, it restores the tab
              size to the default setting.

              You can modify it to suit your tastes.

              ______[Copy below this line]_______
              H="Get Text Statistics"
              ;lrt@... e¿ê
              ;05/03/2004, 06:56:39 AM
              ^!Keyboard Alt+T S M Ctrl+A &200 Alt+C &200 Shift+Ctrl+V Ctrl+Home
              ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS
              ;
              ;----------------------[begin long line]---------------------------
              ^!Keyboard Alt+D P &100 Alt+S #35# Enter &200 Alt+M S B Ctrl+Home &200
              Alt+D P &100 Alt+S Delete Enter
              ;-----------------------[end long line]----------------------------
              ;
              _____[Copy above this line]______
              | right click over the clipbook |
              | and choose "Add from Clipboard" |
              ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

              Be sure to restore the long line in the clip before you try to use it.

              Regards,

              Larry
              lrt@... e¿ê


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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • John Zeman
              ... first clip. ... the ones used most, the words used second most, etc. and that is why the first [0-9]? IF so what does {^.*} mean or I guess what action is
              Message 6 of 18 , May 3 10:49 AM
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                --- In ntb-clips@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Brown" <ebrown27@b...> wrote:
                > Works exactly as advertised. Great.
                >
                > Now I have a question. The second line is exactly the same as the
                first clip.
                > ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS
                > Does this mean to replace the order of the words in the list with
                the ones used most, the words used second most, etc. and that is why
                the first [0-9]? IF so what does {^.*} mean or I guess what action
                is perfomed by this. Then we have \t . what does this do for us? That
                is followed by the first [0-9]. What does the +\. do? then we have
                the second [0-9]+S Altogether at this point we have this equation.
                > ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$"
                > With the part after "Replace space" enclosed in quotation marks.
                This followed with >> "\1" AIWRS . Would you explain how this
                complete clip works in detail?


                I'll answer the part on the ^!Replace line Ed since I'm the one who
                wrote it. If what I'm about to say here doesn't help anyone, it
                ought to at least cure insomnia. <Grin>

                "^!Replace" is a NoteTab clip command where NoteTab searches for some
                text and then replaces that text with something else. To resolve
                your problem of wanting to eliminate the percentages, I used a
                regular expression that I'll further explain below. Regular
                expressions are not unique to NoteTab, they are used in a great
                number of programs. A normal find and replace operation is limited
                to specific text and wildcards, regular expressions do that and so
                much more. The only downer to RegExp is at first, it seems like
                total gobbledygook. For me it took patience and a lot of time to
                gradually figure them out.

                Here's how the following ^!Replace clip works

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS


                ^!Replace "this" >> "that" AIWRS
                Start the NoteTab clip command to find "this" and replace it
                with "that" in a document. What is in between each set of double
                quotes represents what is searched for and what the replacement text
                is. The AIWRS represent the ^!Replace options and their definitions
                can be found in the clip help section.
                A = Replaces all occurrences of the found text in the document.
                I = Ignore character case (I really didn't need it in this situation).
                W = Searches the entire document.
                R = Means the ^!Replace criteria is a regular expression
                S = Silent, just do the replacing without any messages.

                Ok, now to explain how the regular expression part of the clip line
                works.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1" AIWRS

                ^!Replace "
                In a replace operation, the first " marks the beginning of where the
                searched for text will be defined.

                ^!Replace "{
                The { marks the beginning of what is called a tagged match. A tagged
                match is text found during the search, that is to be used in the
                replacement. In other words what is in between a set of { } brackets
                can be referred to in the replacement operation by using \1. If
                there are two sets of { } brackets, then \2 represents what is found
                in between the second set of brackets. I think you can have up to 9
                sets of brackets.

                ^!Replace "{^
                The ^ means "starting at the very beginning of each line".

                ^!Replace "{^.
                The . means to match ANY single character. A number, an alphabet
                letter, punctuation, a space, a tab, anything at all.

                ^!Replace "{^.*
                The * means to match the character that precedes the * 0 or more
                times. So the combination of ^.* means to match anything at all that
                starts at the beginning of each line.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}
                Ok, now we have the closing } which ends the tagged match. If this
                were the only criteria the ^!Replace command was looking for,
                everything in the document would be replaced. Which isn't useful so
                we need to add more to it.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t
                \t represents a tab.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]
                [0-9] represents any one single digit. Anything from 0 through 9.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+
                The + represents 1 or more matches of the one thing that precedes
                it. Since 0-9 is enclosed in between a set of [ ] that entire [0-9]
                represents one thing, a single digit.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.
                The \. represents a period. Remember that normally a period has a
                special meaning in regular expressions so if you want to actually
                search for a period, you have to escape the period with a \

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+
                Like the previous [0-9]+ the second [0-9]+ simply means to find one
                or more digits grouped together.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$
                The $ represents the end of a line (where someone has hit ENTER on
                their keyboard).

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$"
                The second " represents the end of the "find this" section of the ^!
                Replace command.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >>
                The >> tells NoteTab that what follows it will be the text to use to
                replace the text that was found.

                ^!Replace "{^.*}\t[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$" >> "\1"
                And "\1" represents the text that was found in between the set of { }

                So here is how the above clip works.
                Starting at the beginning of each line in the document, search for
                anything at all as long as it ends the line with a TAB followed by
                one or more numbers, followed by a period, followed by one or more
                numbers, and then finally the end of the line. Since we wanted to
                keep everything but the last TAB, the last numbers, etc, we used the
                curly brackets to collect the other text so it could be used as the
                replacement text.

                John
              • Larry Thomas
                ... in those lines. Why use Set? If this is too basic to be answered here that is OK. I understand I am just trying to learn the ABC s and asking a Doctor
                Message 7 of 18 , May 3 2:05 PM
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                  At 10:59 AM 5/3/04 -0500, you wrote:
                  >Works exactly as advertised. Great.
                  >
                  >I see many clips with multiple lines beginning ^!Set. What are we setting
                  in those lines. Why use Set? If this is too basic to be answered here
                  that is OK. I understand I am just trying to learn the ABC's and asking a
                  Doctor of English to teach me the ABC's. :-) After all you cannot build a
                  word until you know the ABC's and you cannot make a sentence until you have
                  a vocabulary of words and neither can I write much of a clip until I
                  understand what each symbol means and what it does and then build a
                  vocabulary of clip parts and actions. Does this make any sense at all?
                  >Ed

                  You are seeing the clip storing information in a named memory location
                  called a variable. The informaation can be a value (any number) or a
                  string (a group of characters). A number can be treated either as a value
                  as in 2 + 2 or as a string as in "2 + 2" which is actually five characters
                  - a two folloed by a space followed by a + followed by a space followed by
                  a two.

                  You can define any variable by using the ^!Set Command with the variable
                  name you choose enclosed in percent characters. Example:

                  ^!Set %Name%=Ed Brown

                  Creates a variable named %Name% which contains the string "Ed Brown". To
                  use the variable in a clip you just place and circumflex (^) in front of
                  it. Example:

                  ^%Name%

                  Placed on a line by itself will insert the string "Ed Brown" into the
                  currently open document at the current cursor position.

                  You can learn all about variables by going to the main help file. Go to
                  the menu bar and select Help/Help Topics.

                  FOR VARIABLES:
                  Go down the left panel to "Reference Information" and under that go to
                  "Tools" and under that go to "Editor Clipbook" and under that go to "Clip
                  Programming". On the right panel go down the page until you come to "Clip
                  Language - Variables" and click on it. This will give you all of the
                  information on variables and how to use them.

                  FOR REGULAR EXPRESSIONS:
                  Go down the left panel to "Reference Information" and under that go to
                  "Dialog Boxes" and underr that go to "Regular Expressions" and you will see
                  all of the information about how regular expressions work.

                  Regards,

                  Larry
                  lrt@... e¿ê
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