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23656Re: [Clip] Image archive

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  • Art Kocsis
    Feb 13, 2013
      At 02-13-2013 05:03, Axel wrote:
      >Take a look at Irfanview, which does quite a good job of doing it on its
      >own. I have some clips for modifying the results. If you like, take a
      >look at
      ><http://familie.berger-odenthal.de/Tews/AlbumMuttiStudiumBeige/Bilder/>http://familie.berger-odenthal.de/Tews/AlbumMuttiStudiumBeige/Bilder/
      >and vary the window width. Making images flow like text instead of
      >enforcing a fixed width is easy, doing the same for images with captions
      >gets a bit more tricky.
      >
      >By the way all the captions are included into the full size high quality
      >images as Jpeg-commentaries. That way I can generate all smaller size
      >images and all captions automatically.

      Axel,

      Did you enter all of the image comments manually or is there a way to use Irfanview to do enter them?

      I haven't used Irfanview in over four years (I use Xnview), so I haven't kept up with any changes. Reading through the Irfanview help file I see where it has quite an extensive command line functionality. I have no need for that but I can see where it would be very useful feature for clips. XNview OTOH has a much better GUI. It features an integrated browser with both tree view and thumbnails plus tabs for multiple full image views. This is more effective for interactive usage. The actual image format support, viewing, processing, converting, etc are pretty much the same in both apps. Since they are both free for home use I will leave both installed.

      In further perusing of their help files I was surprised by the differences in the metadata content (and lack thereof), of the various image file formats. Especially among the main ones: png, jpg, gif, tif & bmp. Irfanview gives detailed definitions of the individual metadata parameters, XNview covers a broader viewpoint with a bit of history thrown in. For example, I had assumed that the EXIF format was an industry standard. It is .... sorta. It was created by a Japanese association in the 90s and was last revised in 2002. However, it is no longer being maintained by anyone but only going on by inertia.

      Art
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