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Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy

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  • Al
    Interesting! I learned of carbon steel or milled steel cookware (I can now add it to my list of types of cookware that I know to exist). And, ditto to what
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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      Interesting! I learned of carbon steel or milled steel cookware (I can
      now add it to my list of types of cookware that I know to exist).

      And, ditto to what Larry said -- I wouldn't have known ESL (BTW I've
      tutored both ESL'rs as well as non ESL'rs in English reading and writing
      at the local junior college here in Sacramento, California U.S.A.)

      http://ouichefcook.com/?p=4534
      ---

      http://www.circulon.com/cs/Satellite/mArticle/1162475169828/circulon/1163100357621/Page/MaterialName/Carbon%2520Steel/en_US/FullPage.htm

      <quote>Carbon steel is often referred to as cold rolled steel or milled
      steel.</quote>

      two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
      of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.

      So, it appears that "carbon steel cookware" is equivalent to "milled
      steel cookware"

      Also appears the carbon steel cookware develops a patina (cast iron
      cookware does that too).

      The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
      characteristics of these two different cookwares.

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
    • loro
      ... Thank you both. You are nice. ... Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could milled have changed into mild with time, maybe provincially? Here
      Message 2 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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        Al wrote:
        >And, ditto to what Larry said -- I wouldn't have known ESL

        Thank you both. You are nice.

        >two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
        >of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.

        Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
        changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?

        Here they use mild.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
        As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
        spell your omelette.
        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel


        >The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
        >characteristics of these two different cookwares.
        >
        >http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808

        I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
        I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
        very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.

        Lotta
      • bruce.somers@web.de
        It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us what ESLers is intended to mean. Bruce [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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          It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us what "ESLers" is intended to mean.

          Bruce

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Margaret Penfold
          ESL=English as a second language. I enjoyed this thread ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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            ESL=English as a second language. I enjoyed this thread
            On 30/01/2011 20:56, bruce.somers@... wrote:
            >
            > It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us
            > what "ESLers" is intended to mean.
            >
            > Bruce
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Al
            ... Instead of that, I think it s the next. My guess is that mild steel is the raw material that gets milled (of which I was totally unaware that mild
            Message 5 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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              loro wrote:
              > Al wrote:
              >
              > <snip>
              >
              >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
              >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
              >>
              >
              > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
              > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
              >

              Instead of that, I think it's the next.

              My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
              which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
              type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
              to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
              steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
              high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel


              Here is a definition for milled

              4. A common name for various machines which produce a
              manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
              by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
              sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
              [1913 Webster]
              > Here they use mild.
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
              > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
              > spell your omelette.
              > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
              > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
              >
              >
              >
              >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
              >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
              >>
              >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
              >>
              >
              > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
              > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
              > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
              >

              Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
              thickness, etc. of cast iron).

              So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
              gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
              this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
              steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

              --
              Alan.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • edward
              http://www.buzzle.com/articles/mild-steel-properties.html The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least. ... From: Al To:
              Message 6 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                http://www.buzzle.com/articles/mild-steel-properties.html
                The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least.
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Al
                To: ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:14 PM
                Subject: Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy



                loro wrote:
                > Al wrote:
                >
                > <snip>
                >
                >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
                >>
                >
                > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
                >

                Instead of that, I think it's the next.

                My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
                which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
                type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
                to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
                steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
                high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel

                Here is a definition for milled

                4. A common name for various machines which produce a
                manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
                by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
                sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
                [1913 Webster]
                > Here they use mild.
                > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                > spell your omelette.
                > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
                >
                >
                >
                >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                >>
                >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
                >>
                >
                > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
                >

                Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
                thickness, etc. of cast iron).

                So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
                gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
                this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
                steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

                --
                Alan.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • edward
                http://www.google.com/#q=omelet+pan&hl=en&prmd=ivns&source=univ&tbs=shop:1&tbo=u&ei=FARGTaieDoTbgQeT7-CgAg&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2
                Message 7 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                  http://www.google.com/#q=omelet+pan&hl=en&prmd=ivns&source=univ&tbs=shop:1&tbo=u&ei=FARGTaieDoTbgQeT7-CgAg&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CFcQrQQwAA&fp=d9008d84f286047
                  The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Al
                  To: ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:14 PM
                  Subject: Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy



                  loro wrote:
                  > Al wrote:
                  >
                  > <snip>
                  >
                  >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                  >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
                  >>
                  >
                  > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                  > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
                  >

                  Instead of that, I think it's the next.

                  My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
                  which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
                  type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
                  to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
                  steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
                  high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel

                  Here is a definition for milled

                  4. A common name for various machines which produce a
                  manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
                  by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
                  sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
                  [1913 Webster]
                  > Here they use mild.
                  > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                  > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                  > spell your omelette.
                  > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                  > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                  >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                  >>
                  >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
                  >>
                  >
                  > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                  > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                  > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
                  >

                  Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
                  thickness, etc. of cast iron).

                  So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
                  gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
                  this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
                  steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

                  --
                  Alan.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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