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Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy

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  • Axel Berger
    ... Well alright, I ll see what I can do. And for good measure I ll bring some beer too. Axel
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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      loro wrote:
      > Axel, you bring the bear, I hope. Yours is superior to ours. ;-)

      Well alright, I'll see what I can do. And for good measure I'll bring
      some beer too.

      Axel
    • loro
      ... Well, as long as you don t bare with me! Could be dangerous around hot pans, that. :-D Darn, that s a mistake I usually don t make, believe it or not.
      Message 2 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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        Axel wrote:
        >loro wrote:
        > > Axel, you bring the bear, I hope. Yours is superior to ours. ;-)
        >
        >Well alright, I'll see what I can do. And for good measure I'll bring
        >some beer too.

        Well, as long as you don't bare with me! Could be dangerous around
        hot pans, that. :-D

        Darn, that's a mistake I usually don't make, believe it or not.

        Lotta.
      • Axel Berger
        ... Don t I know it. There s a fall of instead of fall off by me in this very thread. I ve done worse in official papers handed in to the university. Axel
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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          loro wrote:
          > Darn, that's a mistake I usually don't make, believe it or not.

          Don't I know it. There's a "fall of" instead of "fall off" by me in this
          very thread. I've done worse in official papers handed in to the
          university.

          Axel
        • loro
          ... What s irritating with those small words, is that if native English speakers make those mistakes it s just a typo. If we do them people sometimes think we
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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            Axel wrote:
            >Don't I know it. There's a "fall of" instead of "fall off" by me in this
            >very thread. I've done worse in official papers handed in to the
            >university.

            What's irritating with those small words, is that if native English
            speakers make those mistakes it's just a typo. If we do them people
            sometimes think we don't know the difference. ESLers make typos too.

            Well, of outside to chase me some polar beers now. :-)
            (Both intentional!)
            Lotta
          • Larry Hamilton
            ... Looks like your smell checker is broken. :-) Axel & Lotta - If I did not know you were not native English speakers, your fine use of English would have me
            Message 5 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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              On Sun, Jan 30, 2011 at 5:51 AM, loro <tabbie@...> wrote:

              > Axel wrote:
              > >Don't I know it. There's a "fall of" instead of "fall off" by me in this
              > >very thread. I've done worse in official papers handed in to the
              > >university.
              >
              > What's irritating with those small words, is that if native English
              > speakers make those mistakes it's just a typo. If we do them people
              > sometimes think we don't know the difference. ESLers make typos too.
              >
              > Well, of outside to chase me some polar beers now. :-)
              > (Both intentional!)
              > Lotta
              >

              Looks like your smell checker is broken. :-)

              Axel & Lotta - If I did not know you were not native English speakers, your
              fine use of English would have me fooled.

              I know a lot of Americans whose only language is English, and they don't use
              it very well. The written word seems to be the most difficult of all.

              I once saw a sign at a gas station that said. "Checks will not be excepted".
              I pointed out to the clerk that their sign meant that they take checks. She
              looked at me like I was an idiot. Some people might pronounce them the same,
              but "accepted" is the word they were after.

              I try not to overdo things like that, but a sign at a business like that
              invites comment.

              This whole iron/steel thing is interesting. The different colloquialisms
              between each English speaking country are interesting, and often
              frustrating. The company I work for is based in Canada, and I have to make
              sure I pay attention when I try to communicate with someone at corporate. I
              say holiday and mean a date on the calendar like Memorial Day or Christmas.
              They say holiday and mean vacation. I once wrote to the human resources
              department for clarification about which day the office would be closed for
              a holiday when it fell on the weekend, and they thought I was talking about
              my vacation. I am not sure how they thought that based on the context. I
              even referenced the policy manual.

              ~ Larry


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Al
              Interesting! I learned of carbon steel or milled steel cookware (I can now add it to my list of types of cookware that I know to exist). And, ditto to what
              Message 6 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                Interesting! I learned of carbon steel or milled steel cookware (I can
                now add it to my list of types of cookware that I know to exist).

                And, ditto to what Larry said -- I wouldn't have known ESL (BTW I've
                tutored both ESL'rs as well as non ESL'rs in English reading and writing
                at the local junior college here in Sacramento, California U.S.A.)

                http://ouichefcook.com/?p=4534
                ---

                http://www.circulon.com/cs/Satellite/mArticle/1162475169828/circulon/1163100357621/Page/MaterialName/Carbon%2520Steel/en_US/FullPage.htm

                <quote>Carbon steel is often referred to as cold rolled steel or milled
                steel.</quote>

                two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.

                So, it appears that "carbon steel cookware" is equivalent to "milled
                steel cookware"

                Also appears the carbon steel cookware develops a patina (cast iron
                cookware does that too).

                The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                characteristics of these two different cookwares.

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
              • loro
                ... Thank you both. You are nice. ... Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could milled have changed into mild with time, maybe provincially? Here
                Message 7 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                  Al wrote:
                  >And, ditto to what Larry said -- I wouldn't have known ESL

                  Thank you both. You are nice.

                  >two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                  >of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.

                  Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                  changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?

                  Here they use mild.
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                  As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                  spell your omelette.
                  http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                  http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel


                  >The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                  >characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                  >
                  >http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808

                  I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                  I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                  very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.

                  Lotta
                • bruce.somers@web.de
                  It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us what ESLers is intended to mean. Bruce [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                    It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us what "ESLers" is intended to mean.

                    Bruce

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Margaret Penfold
                    ESL=English as a second language. I enjoyed this thread ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                      ESL=English as a second language. I enjoyed this thread
                      On 30/01/2011 20:56, bruce.somers@... wrote:
                      >
                      > It would be a very nice gesture if someone would tell us
                      > what "ESLers" is intended to mean.
                      >
                      > Bruce
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Al
                      ... Instead of that, I think it s the next. My guess is that mild steel is the raw material that gets milled (of which I was totally unaware that mild
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                        loro wrote:
                        > Al wrote:
                        >
                        > <snip>
                        >
                        >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                        >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
                        >>
                        >
                        > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                        > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
                        >

                        Instead of that, I think it's the next.

                        My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
                        which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
                        type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
                        to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
                        steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
                        high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel


                        Here is a definition for milled

                        4. A common name for various machines which produce a
                        manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
                        by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
                        sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
                        [1913 Webster]
                        > Here they use mild.
                        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                        > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                        > spell your omelette.
                        > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                        > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                        >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                        >>
                        >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
                        >>
                        >
                        > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                        > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                        > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
                        >

                        Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
                        thickness, etc. of cast iron).

                        So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
                        gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
                        this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
                        steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

                        --
                        Alan.



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • edward
                        http://www.buzzle.com/articles/mild-steel-properties.html The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least. ... From: Al To:
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                          http://www.buzzle.com/articles/mild-steel-properties.html
                          The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least.
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Al
                          To: ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:14 PM
                          Subject: Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy



                          loro wrote:
                          > Al wrote:
                          >
                          > <snip>
                          >
                          >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                          >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
                          >>
                          >
                          > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                          > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
                          >

                          Instead of that, I think it's the next.

                          My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
                          which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
                          type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
                          to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
                          steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
                          high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

                          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel

                          Here is a definition for milled

                          4. A common name for various machines which produce a
                          manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
                          by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
                          sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
                          [1913 Webster]
                          > Here they use mild.
                          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                          > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                          > spell your omelette.
                          > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                          > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                          >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                          >>
                          >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
                          >>
                          >
                          > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                          > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                          > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
                          >

                          Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
                          thickness, etc. of cast iron).

                          So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
                          gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
                          this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
                          steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

                          --
                          Alan.

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • edward
                          http://www.google.com/#q=omelet+pan&hl=en&prmd=ivns&source=univ&tbs=shop:1&tbo=u&ei=FARGTaieDoTbgQeT7-CgAg&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 30, 2011
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                            http://www.google.com/#q=omelet+pan&hl=en&prmd=ivns&source=univ&tbs=shop:1&tbo=u&ei=FARGTaieDoTbgQeT7-CgAg&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CFcQrQQwAA&fp=d9008d84f286047
                            The richest person is not the one who has the most, but the one who needs the least.
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Al
                            To: ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:14 PM
                            Subject: Re: [NTO] Kitchen English - or metallurgy



                            loro wrote:
                            > Al wrote:
                            >
                            > <snip>
                            >
                            >> two l's, "milled" like grist mill or steel mill. I've still not heard
                            >> of mild steel cookware, I just did a Google search on it.
                            >>
                            >
                            > Milled sounds like a more proper word for it. Could "milled" have
                            > changed into "mild" with time, maybe provincially?
                            >

                            Instead of that, I think it's the next.

                            My guess is that "mild steel" is the raw material that gets "milled" (of
                            which I was totally unaware that mild steel is used in any or a certain
                            type of cookware). "mild steel" is a term that's utilized to reference
                            to a quality of steel with a higher level of carbon than low carbon
                            steel. "carbon steel" would include low, mild, medium, high, and ultra
                            high carbon content steels. (as per your link)

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel

                            Here is a definition for milled

                            4. A common name for various machines which produce a
                            manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material
                            by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a
                            sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
                            [1913 Webster]
                            > Here they use mild.
                            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mild_steel#Mild_and_low_carbon_steel
                            > As for the omelette pans... mostly UK and Australia, however you
                            > spell your omelette.
                            > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelette+pan+mild+steel
                            > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=omelet+pan+mild+steel
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >> The next is reasons why to choose carbon steel versus cast iron ie
                            >> characteristics of these two different cookwares.
                            >>
                            >> http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/297808
                            >>
                            >
                            > I don't know if they say this there, haven't read all of it yet, but
                            > I think one argument for carbon steel is that you can get the heat up
                            > very quickly if you need to. The sheer weight of cast iron makes it slow.
                            >

                            Quicker to heat and quicker to cool (versus, yes, the sheer weight,
                            thickness, etc. of cast iron).

                            So, if I have it correct, carbon steel of the mild variety or mild steel
                            gets milled, resulting in the end product cookware. I've observed that
                            this type of cookware is referenced in multiple ways such as milled
                            steel cookware, carbon steel cookware, and mild steel.

                            --
                            Alan.

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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