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Re: [NTO] [FUN] Can you read this?

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  • fw7oaks
    ... Hi Axel, Could you point me in the direction of a German version. Danke ! fw
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 28, 2008
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      --- On Tue, 10/28/08, Axel Berger <Axel-Berger@...> wrote:

      > I had only seen that in German until now.

      Hi Axel,

      Could you point me in the direction of a German version.

      Danke !

      fw
    • Gerard Huijing
      ... Nice one, Lotta. I wonder what would happen if you first told people that this was the English as it was spoken in, say, the time of King Alfred. :-) That
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2008
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        loro wrote:
        >
        >
        > Not related to Notetab at all. Just think it's fun - and interesting.
        >
        > <http://www.jordanmaxwell.com/images/monkey/reading_test.jpg
        > <http://www.jordanmaxwell.com/images/monkey/reading_test.jpg>>
        >
        > Lotta


        Nice one, Lotta.
        I wonder what would happen if you first told people that this was the
        English as it was spoken in, say, the time of King Alfred. :-)

        That *does* look very weird too ...

        Cheers, Gerard


        --
        Gerard (E.G.P.) Huijing
        2312 ZD Leiden
        Netherlands
        inboxgen@...
      • loro
        ... That reminds me of something strange that happened to both me and a friend of mine. Here in Sweden foreign movies normally get subtitles, the exception
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 1, 2008
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          Gerard Huijing wrote:
          >I wonder what would happen if you first told people that this was the
          >English as it was spoken in, say, the time of King Alfred. :-)

          That reminds me of something strange that happened to both me and a
          friend of mine. Here in Sweden foreign movies normally get subtitles,
          the exception being films for young children that are dubbed for
          obvious reasons.

          My friend and I both liked Michael Ende's "Die Unendliche
          Geschichte", a fantasy novel of sorts. When the American screen
          adaption The Neverending Story, came, we went to see it.

          So there we were, two adults and 200 kids. The movie began and we
          couldn't hear a word they were saying, sounded like a drunken
          murmur. Realized there were no subtitles either. Both the sound and
          the subs were botched up and we really wanted to enjoy the movie -
          outrageous! After 10 minutes or se we started to get upset. The kids
          seemed to enjoy it anyway, but we didn't. We were about to hunt a
          responsible person down and demand things would be fixed when it
          dawned on us. Yeah, you guessed it. The movie was dubbed to Swedish
          and we didn't hear a words they were saying because we expected them
          to talk English. Oops!

          Still don't think it's a children's book. Grmpff.
          Lotta
        • Gerard Huijing
          ... I can sympathize. I once stood beside a young woman at a party, who speaks completely fluent Dutch without any foreign accent whatsoever (I think she was
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 1, 2008
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            loro wrote:
            >
            >
            > Gerard Huijing wrote:
            > >I wonder what would happen if you first told people that this was the
            > >English as it was spoken in, say, the time of King Alfred. :-)
            >
            > That reminds me of something strange that happened to both me and a
            > friend of mine. Here in Sweden foreign movies normally get subtitles,
            > the exception being films for young children that are dubbed for
            > obvious reasons.
            >
            > My friend and I both liked Michael Ende's "Die Unendliche
            > Geschichte", a fantasy novel of sorts. When the American screen
            > adaption The Neverending Story, came, we went to see it.
            >
            > So there we were, two adults and 200 kids. The movie began and we
            > couldn't hear a word they were saying, sounded like a drunken
            > murmur. Realized there were no subtitles either. Both the sound and
            > the subs were botched up and we really wanted to enjoy the movie -
            > outrageous! After 10 minutes or se we started to get upset. The kids
            > seemed to enjoy it anyway, but we didn't. We were about to hunt a
            > responsible person down and demand things would be fixed when it
            > dawned on us. Yeah, you guessed it. The movie was dubbed to Swedish
            > and we didn't hear a words they were saying because we expected them
            > to talk English. Oops!
            >
            > Still don't think it's a children's book. Grmpff.
            > Lotta

            I can sympathize. I once stood beside a young woman at a party, who
            speaks completely fluent Dutch without any foreign accent whatsoever (I
            think she was raised in Holland but I do not know if she was born
            there), and she was having a conversation with some older people. It
            sounded so weird that I thought she was was paralytically drunk, until I
            realized that she was speaking Armenian to her parents!

            But to return to the spelling stuff. I found it very strange to read
            that the Cambridge study revealed that no less than 55% did *not*
            understand it.
            I myself spotted what was wrong without detecting and describing the
            algorithm, so to speak.
            I bet others (programmers? mathematicians?) work exactly the other way
            round.
            How on earth does this all work in the brain?
            I bet my boots Wittgenstein has something about that, somewhere.

            Cheers,
            Gerard

            --
            Gerard (E.G.P.) Huijing
            2312 ZD Leiden
            Netherlands
            inboxgen@...
          • Axel Berger
            ... That s one I know well, You have no clue while your mind tries to parse the wrong language. I once heard physics lectures by a Chinese professor with, for
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 2, 2008
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              loro wrote:
              > and we didn't hear a words they were saying because we expected them
              > to talk English.

              That's one I know well, You have no clue while your mind tries to parse
              the wrong language. I once heard physics lectures by a Chinese professor
              with, for one reason or another, a Dutch accent. Whenever a word eluded
              him he seamlessly switched from German with a Dutch accent into English
              with a Dutch accent. It was absolutely perfect English and quite easy to
              understand, but until I caught on it was pure gobbledegook to me.
              Happened every time and hardly got better during the semester.

              Axel
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