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Re: [NTO] Programs Installations

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  • fw7oaks
    ... I agree with Axel and do the same, however I should mention that there are some programs out there that if they find a C: partition will install in there
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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      --- On Sat, 9/6/08, Axel Berger <Axel-Berger@...> wrote:

      >>"M.M." wrote:

      >> I would like to have your opinion about this, 'cons and pros'

      > I never have the system or the program files on C:.

      I agree with Axel and do the same, however I should mention that there are some programs out there that if they find a C: partition will install in there without asking. Adobe were at one stage guilty of this.

      fw
    • John Zeman
      ... C , ... FWIW I never have multiple partitions on a drive as I ve never found any valid reason to do so. Especially now days when there are so many
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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        --- In ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com, M.M. <m.mordechai@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        > Have to replace harddisk in my computer, which leads to a whole new
        > installation of
        > OS (win xp pro) and all other programs.
        > The disk is divided into several partitions, the OS was installed on
        "C",
        > and all other programs
        > I used to install on another partition (don't know why, I think I read
        > sometime something
        > about this). Or should I install all the programs also on "C" - in the
        > "Program Files" folder.
        > The other partitions are to store data.
        > I would like to have your opinion about this, 'cons and pros'
        > Thanks in advance
        > Mordechai


        FWIW I never have multiple partitions on a drive as I've never found
        any valid reason to do so. Especially now days when there are so many
        removable devices out there that we attach to our computers using up
        most of the drive letters. I do use 2 hard internal hard drives
        however, the C: drive holds my operating system and all of my programs
        while the D: drive holds all of my data. Once a year I'll clone and
        swap out the C: drive for a new one and once every 18 months I'll
        clone and swap out the D: drive. I also keep multiple external hard
        drive backups of my D: drive stored in various locations, including
        one in a safe deposit box in my local bank.

        Using this method when I change out hard drives I never have to
        reinstall any programs or Windows, it makes life much easier for me.

        John
      • Larry Hamilton
        ... ... Mordechai, You have an opportunity to plan this out and do it in a way that will simplify the next time. I recommend C: for Windows and
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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          M.M. wrote:
          > Hello,
          > Have to replace harddisk in my computer, which leads to a whole new
          > installation of
          > OS (win xp pro) and all other programs.
          > The disk is divided into several partitions, the OS was installed on "C",
          >
          <snip>
          > I would like to have your opinion about this, 'cons and pros'
          > Thanks in advance
          > Mordechai
          Mordechai,

          You have an opportunity to plan this out and do it in a way that will
          simplify the next time.

          I recommend C:\ for Windows and programs. What I would do is install
          Windows and then patch it all the way, defrag with something like
          jkdefrag (freeware & very good). Then clone the disk with one of the
          free "ghost" programs. This way, you will have an install point if you
          ever want to start fresh and save a lot of time. You will find that a
          fresh install of Windows is a lot faster than after it builds up the
          registry rot. Having this image will get you back to this point very
          quickly.

          Then install all your main programs that you know you will always use.
          Then defrag and clone again. This will give you a "full system" the next
          time you need to get a new drive and save a ton of time.

          I would have all data on another partition. Of course, do regular
          backups. Having data on another partition saves the hassle of wiping it
          out just to format c: to do a reinstall. If you can do it, having data
          on a separate physical drive makes this even better.

          I also install programs that can handle it to e:\Program Files, so I do
          not have to keep re-installing them. I do this with NoteTab, since I do
          not have it save to the Registry. I also do this with the other Fookes
          products, and many other products. Most programs can figure out what to
          do without a reinstall. This save me a lot of time when I have to re-do
          Windows. It also allows me to get away with a smaller partition for
          Windows.

          I dual boot and have Windows and Slackware Linux on one drive and my
          data and home one another drive. Windows & Linux have different drive
          formats, so I can re-install one without harming the other, including
          formatting. I then back up all my data to an external hard drive. I like
          John's idea of keeping a drive in the safe deposit box. I also like the
          idea, though expensive, of all the hard drives.

          Larry Hamilton
          Kairos Computer Solutions
          http://www.kairoscomputers.com/
          Sales Affiliate for Grisoft Anti-Virus
        • Axel Berger
          ... I don t know about NTFS but with FAT32 there is one: I use huge partitions for big multi-MB files, but try to place many small files, like HTML sources or
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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            John Zeman wrote:
            > FWIW I never have multiple partitions on a drive as I've
            > never found any valid reason to do so.

            I don't know about NTFS but with FAT32 there is one: I use huge
            partitions for big multi-MB files, but try to place many small
            files, like HTML sources or TeX on one with no more than 8 GB. I
            seems to run faster that way, but especially whenever scandisk runs
            the penalty of many small files on a huge disk is enormous.

            Axel
          • M.M.
            Hello First Thanks to all for your answers. And to Larry: Sorry, I do not follow you, starting your answer you recommed installing OS AND all other programs
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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              Hello
              First Thanks to all for your answers.
              And to Larry: Sorry, I do not follow you, starting your answer you recommed
              installing OS AND all other programs into "C" (same partition and has to be
              big enough), and further you say that you install the programs to "E" which
              is another partition, how come??, as I said - I do not follow, please
              explain.
              Thanks again
              Mordechai


              On 9/6/08, Larry Hamilton <lmh@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > M.M. wrote:
              > > Hello,
              > > Have to replace harddisk in my computer, which leads to a whole new
              > > installation of
              > > OS (win xp pro) and all other programs.
              > > The disk is divided into several partitions, the OS was installed on "C",
              > >
              > <snip>
              > > I would like to have your opinion about this, 'cons and pros'
              > > Thanks in advance
              > > Mordechai
              > Mordechai,
              >
              > You have an opportunity to plan this out and do it in a way that will
              > simplify the next time.
              >
              > I recommend C:\ for Windows and programs. What I would do is install
              > Windows and then patch it all the way, defrag with something like
              > jkdefrag (freeware & very good). Then clone the disk with one of the
              > free "ghost" programs. This way, you will have an install point if you
              > ever want to start fresh and save a lot of time. You will find that a
              > fresh install of Windows is a lot faster than after it builds up the
              > registry rot. Having this image will get you back to this point very
              > quickly.
              >
              > Then install all your main programs that you know you will always use.
              > Then defrag and clone again. This will give you a "full system" the next
              > time you need to get a new drive and save a ton of time.
              >
              > I would have all data on another partition. Of course, do regular
              > backups. Having data on another partition saves the hassle of wiping it
              > out just to format c: to do a reinstall. If you can do it, having data
              > on a separate physical drive makes this even better.
              >
              > I also install programs that can handle it to e:\Program Files, so I do
              > not have to keep re-installing them. I do this with NoteTab, since I do
              > not have it save to the Registry. I also do this with the other Fookes
              > products, and many other products. Most programs can figure out what to
              > do without a reinstall. This save me a lot of time when I have to re-do
              > Windows. It also allows me to get away with a smaller partition for
              > Windows.
              >
              > I dual boot and have Windows and Slackware Linux on one drive and my
              > data and home one another drive. Windows & Linux have different drive
              > formats, so I can re-install one without harming the other, including
              > formatting. I then back up all my data to an external hard drive. I like
              > John's idea of keeping a drive in the safe deposit box. I also like the
              > idea, though expensive, of all the hard drives.
              >
              > Larry Hamilton
              > Kairos Computer Solutions
              > http://www.kairoscomputers.com/
              > Sales Affiliate for Grisoft Anti-Virus
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Larry Hamilton
              ... Sorry if I was not clear, multitasking strikes again! ;-) I put the OS on C: as required. I put data and programs on another physical drive, in my case
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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                M.M. wrote:
                > Hello
                > First Thanks to all for your answers.
                > And to Larry: Sorry, I do not follow you, starting your answer you recommed
                > installing OS AND all other programs into "C" (same partition and has to be
                > big enough), and further you say that you install the programs to "E" which
                > is another partition, how come??, as I said - I do not follow, please
                > explain.
                > Thanks again
                > Mordechai
                >
                Sorry if I was not clear, multitasking strikes again! ;-)

                I put the OS on C:\ as required. I put data and programs on another
                physical drive, in my case E:\. If Windows needs to be reinstalled for
                some reason, my programs are preserved. I have to re-build shortcuts,
                but most programs can handle not being re-installed in this situation.

                I do this to save time and simplify my set up. The only programs I put
                on C:\ are ones that do no give me a choice on install.

                I also tell My Documents to store on another partition, since my
                teenager likes to fill up his ipod software with music and movies, the
                rest of us run out of room. ;-)

                I hope this is more clear.

                Larry Hamilton
              • M.M.
                Thanks a lot! Regards Mordechai ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 6, 2008
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                  Thanks a lot!
                  Regards
                  Mordechai


                  On 9/6/08, Larry Hamilton <lmh@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > M.M. wrote:
                  > > Hello
                  > > First Thanks to all for your answers.
                  > > And to Larry: Sorry, I do not follow you, starting your answer you
                  > recommed
                  > > installing OS AND all other programs into "C" (same partition and has to
                  > be
                  > > big enough), and further you say that you install the programs to "E"
                  > which
                  > > is another partition, how come??, as I said - I do not follow, please
                  > > explain.
                  > > Thanks again
                  > > Mordechai
                  > >
                  > Sorry if I was not clear, multitasking strikes again! ;-)
                  >
                  > I put the OS on C:\ as required. I put data and programs on another
                  > physical drive, in my case E:\. If Windows needs to be reinstalled for
                  > some reason, my programs are preserved. I have to re-build shortcuts,
                  > but most programs can handle not being re-installed in this situation.
                  >
                  > I do this to save time and simplify my set up. The only programs I put
                  > on C:\ are ones that do no give me a choice on install.
                  >
                  > I also tell My Documents to store on another partition, since my
                  > teenager likes to fill up his ipod software with music and movies, the
                  > rest of us run out of room. ;-)
                  >
                  > I hope this is more clear.
                  >
                  > Larry Hamilton
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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