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Re: [NTO] Re: hope this isn't too far off-topic

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  • Brian Binder
    ... Yes it will do those drives as well. It doesn t care at all about formatting. You don t even have to have a formatted drive to use the software. If it s
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 24, 2005
      On 8/24/05, Carol Whitney <cwhitney@...> wrote:
      > At 15:23 05-08-24 +0000, bbinder79 wrote:

      > Would it do old drives formatted under DOS? I have some I'd love to
      > have the data back from. But I'd have to have my dealer do it; my two
      > 386's are gone - no working battery in them! I gather it's too
      > expensive to repair those!

      Yes it will do those drives as well. It doesn't care at all about
      formatting. You don't even have to have a formatted drive to use the
      software.

      If it's an IDE drive (which worked fine in a 386), I'd simply plug it
      in as a secondary in a newer PC and have HDD Regen do a scan. You can
      scan the drive(s) from any PC so long as the BIOS and the program
      recognizes the drive(s).

      I've grabbed drives from a 386 before and put them in a brand new PC,
      set them up as Master/Slaves and scanned things just fine.
    • Alec Burgess
      Brian: I have an external 40 GB Maxtor drive connected to my laptop which shows up in: ... but doesn t show up anywhere under MyComputer-Manage-Storage-Logical
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 24, 2005
        Brian:

        I have an external 40 GB Maxtor drive connected to my laptop which shows up
        in:
        MyComputer-Manage-Device Manager-Disk drives as:
        >>Maxtor 3000LE v01.00.00 USB Device<<

        but doesn't show up anywhere under
        MyComputer-Manage-Storage-Logical Drives.

        It used to be drive E: until one day it just "disappeared".

        I asked Maxtor tech support and as I'd suspected they confirmed its
        basically toast.

        I've downloaded HDD Regenerator but haven't built the boot-floppy yet (no
        CD-RW on laptop).

        Question: Is there any point trying it or is HDD Regenerator going to be
        unable to see the Maxtor drive just like everything else? If there is, if I
        create the boot-floppy will I be prompted to select the drive to check? I
        don't want to accidentally touch my working C: harddrive.

        Regards ... Alec
        --
        ; ( ) { } [ ] \ | 9 0 + = () {} []

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Brian Binder" <brian.binder@...>
        To: <ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2005 16:26
        Subject: [gla: Re: [NTO] Re: hope this isn't too far off-topic


        On 8/24/05, Carol Whitney <cwhitney@...> wrote:
        > At 15:23 05-08-24 +0000, bbinder79 wrote:

        > Would it do old drives formatted under DOS? I have some I'd love to
        > have the data back from. But I'd have to have my dealer do it; my two
        > 386's are gone - no working battery in them! I gather it's too
        > expensive to repair those!

        Yes it will do those drives as well. It doesn't care at all about
        formatting. You don't even have to have a formatted drive to use the
        software.

        If it's an IDE drive (which worked fine in a 386), I'd simply plug it
        in as a secondary in a newer PC and have HDD Regen do a scan. You can
        scan the drive(s) from any PC so long as the BIOS and the program
        recognizes the drive(s).

        I've grabbed drives from a 386 before and put them in a brand new PC,
        set them up as Master/Slaves and scanned things just fine.




        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Brian Binder
        ... Let s make sure we re checking out the same section. Check out my screenshot here: http://www.bndservices.com/notetab/disks.jpg Is that what you see, but
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 24, 2005
          On 8/24/05, Alec Burgess <buralex@...> wrote:
          > Brian:
          >
          > I have an external 40 GB Maxtor drive connected to my laptop which shows up
          > in:
          > MyComputer-Manage-Device Manager-Disk drives as:
          > >>Maxtor 3000LE v01.00.00 USB Device<<
          >
          > but doesn't show up anywhere under
          > MyComputer-Manage-Storage-Logical Drives.

          Let's make sure we're checking out the same section. Check out my
          screenshot here: http://www.bndservices.com/notetab/disks.jpg

          Is that what you see, but minus your USB drive? Mine shows up in
          there so that I can manage it. I manually changed the drive letter on
          it so that I could access the data on it. I had to change mine to
          something higher up in the alphabet, so I chose X since it's a backup
          drive.

          You should be able to see a USB device in there and right-click on it
          and change the drive letter like it shows in the screenie.

          > It used to be drive E: until one day it just "disappeared".
          >
          > I asked Maxtor tech support and as I'd suspected they confirmed its
          > basically toast.
          >
          > I've downloaded HDD Regenerator but haven't built the boot-floppy yet (no
          > CD-RW on laptop).

          You shouldn't need a CD-RW. You just need a floppy disk to boot from.
          You can put it on a CD-R in addition to a floppy, but I run it from a
          floppy disk almost every time.

          > Question: Is there any point trying it or is HDD Regenerator going to be
          > unable to see the Maxtor drive just like everything else? If there is, if I
          > create the boot-floppy will I be prompted to select the drive to check? I
          > don't want to accidentally touch my working C: harddrive.

          Even if you did look at your C drive, I've never had any adverse side
          effects from the HDD Regen software at all, so you'd be safe running
          it on any drive IMO. Call it preventative maintenance if nothing
          else. Maybe you'd get lucky and find something you didn't know
          existed. But yes, chances are it's altogether unnecessary to run it
          on your main drive if you suspect it to be functioning correctly.

          It is quite possible that your USB drive might still be just fine, but
          we might have to make Windows remember how to access it again. Then
          again...maybe not. I will tell you that the boot disk for HDD Regen
          does not recognize USB devices, so you would be out of luck if you
          kept it in the USB drive housing.

          Personally if it were me (and the drive's warranty was not an issue)
          I'd take it out of the USB housing and plug it into the PC directly
          via the IDE or EIDE cable that's appropriate.

          I had a similar problem with my USB drive. Checked out the Event Log
          in XP and found there to be so many errors on the drive, but Windows
          knew the drive existed. Did more than a few things to try and remedy
          the situation but couldn't. In the end, I removed it from the
          USB/Firewire housing and plugged it in directly to my machine and it's
          worked perfect ever since.

          Now, it's not the greatest, as the darn housing is useless, but at
          least I've got my drive and it's working just fine. If I were you,
          I'd try removing the drive and seeing if the disk itself is truly bad,
          or if it's the controller on the housing that's faulty. More times
          than not, my experience has taught me that the housings go bad far
          more than the drives. I've known people that have gone through
          countless housings. It's actually a reason on why I simply won't buy
          another one. They haven't been worth the trouble.

          I will comment that I have had nothing but good luck with other
          drives, like the smaller hard drives that require power only from the
          USB ports, like Seagate's black series of USB drives that range from
          20?-100GB. Very nice drives. But IDE/EIDE drives in a USB/Firewire
          housing? No thank you.

          HDD Regen will not do anything until you ask it to, so you won't have
          to worry about it starting when you haven't given it permission. Then
          again, if your USB interface on the housing itself was the problem,
          you might find yourself saving time and frustration by plugging it
          into your PC directly and finding everything in a perfectly working
          state. I'll keep my fingers crossed for some good fortune to come
          your way on this one! ;)
        • Vance E. Neff
          Brian, I have a similar problem, an USB drive connected to a laptop. Being a laptop, there is no way to utilize a drive enclosure in order to attach the drive
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
            Brian,

            I have a similar problem, an USB drive connected to a laptop. Being a
            laptop, there is no way to utilize a drive enclosure in order to attach
            the drive directly to the computer's bus on the laptop. But, are you
            indicating that if the drive can be seen at all by the operating system
            via the USB port that HDD Regenerator will handle it?

            Vance

            Brian Binder wrote:

            >On 8/24/05, Alec Burgess <buralex@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >> Brian:
            >>
            >> I have an external 40 GB Maxtor drive connected to my laptop which shows up
            >> in:
            >> MyComputer-Manage-Device Manager-Disk drives as:
            >> >>Maxtor 3000LE v01.00.00 USB Device<<
            >>
            >> but doesn't show up anywhere under
            >> MyComputer-Manage-Storage-Logical Drives.
            >>
            >>
            >
            >Let's make sure we're checking out the same section. Check out my
            >screenshot here: http://www.bndservices.com/notetab/disks.jpg
            >
            >Is that what you see, but minus your USB drive? Mine shows up in
            >there so that I can manage it. I manually changed the drive letter on
            >it so that I could access the data on it. I had to change mine to
            >something higher up in the alphabet, so I chose X since it's a backup
            >drive.
            >
            >You should be able to see a USB device in there and right-click on it
            >and change the drive letter like it shows in the screenie.
            >
            >
            >
            >> It used to be drive E: until one day it just "disappeared".
            >>
            >> I asked Maxtor tech support and as I'd suspected they confirmed its
            >> basically toast.
            >>
            >> I've downloaded HDD Regenerator but haven't built the boot-floppy yet (no
            >> CD-RW on laptop).
            >>
            >>
            >
            >You shouldn't need a CD-RW. You just need a floppy disk to boot from.
            > You can put it on a CD-R in addition to a floppy, but I run it from a
            >floppy disk almost every time.
            >
            >
            >
            >> Question: Is there any point trying it or is HDD Regenerator going to be
            >> unable to see the Maxtor drive just like everything else? If there is, if I
            >> create the boot-floppy will I be prompted to select the drive to check? I
            >> don't want to accidentally touch my working C: harddrive.
            >>
            >>
            >
            >Even if you did look at your C drive, I've never had any adverse side
            >effects from the HDD Regen software at all, so you'd be safe running
            >it on any drive IMO. Call it preventative maintenance if nothing
            >else. Maybe you'd get lucky and find something you didn't know
            >existed. But yes, chances are it's altogether unnecessary to run it
            >on your main drive if you suspect it to be functioning correctly.
            >
            >It is quite possible that your USB drive might still be just fine, but
            >we might have to make Windows remember how to access it again. Then
            >again...maybe not. I will tell you that the boot disk for HDD Regen
            >does not recognize USB devices, so you would be out of luck if you
            >kept it in the USB drive housing.
            >
            >Personally if it were me (and the drive's warranty was not an issue)
            >I'd take it out of the USB housing and plug it into the PC directly
            >via the IDE or EIDE cable that's appropriate.
            >
            >I had a similar problem with my USB drive. Checked out the Event Log
            >in XP and found there to be so many errors on the drive, but Windows
            >knew the drive existed. Did more than a few things to try and remedy
            >the situation but couldn't. In the end, I removed it from the
            >USB/Firewire housing and plugged it in directly to my machine and it's
            >worked perfect ever since.
            >
            >Now, it's not the greatest, as the darn housing is useless, but at
            >least I've got my drive and it's working just fine. If I were you,
            >I'd try removing the drive and seeing if the disk itself is truly bad,
            >or if it's the controller on the housing that's faulty. More times
            >than not, my experience has taught me that the housings go bad far
            >more than the drives. I've known people that have gone through
            >countless housings. It's actually a reason on why I simply won't buy
            >another one. They haven't been worth the trouble.
            >
            >I will comment that I have had nothing but good luck with other
            >drives, like the smaller hard drives that require power only from the
            >USB ports, like Seagate's black series of USB drives that range from
            >20?-100GB. Very nice drives. But IDE/EIDE drives in a USB/Firewire
            >housing? No thank you.
            >
            >HDD Regen will not do anything until you ask it to, so you won't have
            >to worry about it starting when you haven't given it permission. Then
            >again, if your USB interface on the housing itself was the problem,
            >you might find yourself saving time and frustration by plugging it
            >into your PC directly and finding everything in a perfectly working
            >state. I'll keep my fingers crossed for some good fortune to come
            >your way on this one! ;)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Brian Binder
            ... No. Unless the latest version of HDD Regen supports USB drives (I don t have the latest version) if won t be recognized, as the program runs outside of
            Message 5 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
              On 8/25/05, Vance E. Neff <veneff@...> wrote:
              > Brian,
              >
              > I have a similar problem, an USB drive connected to a laptop. Being a
              > laptop, there is no way to utilize a drive enclosure in order to attach
              > the drive directly to the computer's bus on the laptop. But, are you
              > indicating that if the drive can be seen at all by the operating system
              > via the USB port that HDD Regenerator will handle it?

              No. Unless the latest version of HDD Regen supports USB drives (I
              don't have the latest version) if won't be recognized, as the program
              runs outside of Windows. So even if Windows sees it, it doesn't mean
              that HDD Regen will.

              But I am curious as to what exactly the problem is with the USB drive?
              Is it that you cannot see it? HDD Regen is for repairing bad
              sectors. If you cannot see it in Windows, you just might have to make
              sure Windows is assigning it a proper drive letter so that it shows
              up.

              Shoot us some more information on it and we'll see what we can do with it.

              Thanks!
            • r. blake mooney
              Brian, From my experience, which is very limited, I never could get my BIOS or any other programs to look and find my crashed HD. That s whne I bought the
              Message 6 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                Brian,
                From my experience, which is very limited, I never could get my BIOS or any other programs to"look and find" my crashed HD. That's whne I bought the orig. SpinRite, which hung at 16.43 percent into the repair or whatever they called it.

                When I used the Regenerator it also "recognized" the crashed HD. I started the run on the bad drive but cut it off at one hour due to other constraints. As I mentioned in an earlier email, I did wish that the Regen had had a time bar or clock to kind of co-mmunicate with me--a back and forth thing. But tonight I will re-run the whole "trial" version of the Regen program, but would like to mention that all of these "recovery" programs require a boot from the "A" drive. If anyone can actually "see" their "C drive" and anything on it, it seems, therefore, to me, that they need to run scandisk and defrag. If this results in a failed attempt, meaning that if the Windows (version unknow) refuses to go further with the scandisk or defrag programs, then they must run the Regen program. It's merely this gray area that I've been noticing in the back-and-forth between members about "crashed" drives--I get the feeling that some can actually acquire their questionable "crashed" HD and data
                on it. If this is wrong, then they obviously can't do anything but fall back to Regen or try SpinRite as we did. And...yes...I still use SpinRite on my other HD's. Takes about 2 - 3 hours.
                Blake

                Brian Binder <brian.binder@...> wrote:
                On 8/25/05, Vance E. Neff <veneff@...> wrote:
                > Brian,
                >
                > I have a similar problem, an USB drive connected to a laptop. Being a
                > laptop, there is no way to utilize a drive enclosure in order to attach
                > the drive directly to the computer's bus on the laptop. But, are you
                > indicating that if the drive can be seen at all by the operating system
                > via the USB port that HDD Regenerator will handle it?

                No. Unless the latest version of HDD Regen supports USB drives (I
                don't have the latest version) if won't be recognized, as the program
                runs outside of Windows. So even if Windows sees it, it doesn't mean
                that HDD Regen will.

                But I am curious as to what exactly the problem is with the USB drive?
                Is it that you cannot see it? HDD Regen is for repairing bad
                sectors. If you cannot see it in Windows, you just might have to make
                sure Windows is assigning it a proper drive letter so that it shows
                up.

                Shoot us some more information on it and we'll see what we can do with it.

                Thanks!


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              • Brian Binder
                ... Seems kind of odd. I mean, if the BIOS doesn t recognize a drive, then neither will anything else. So somehow your BIOS has to be seeing it. ... It has a
                Message 7 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                  On 8/25/05, r. blake mooney <mooney_rb@...> wrote:
                  > Brian,
                  > From my experience, which is very limited, I never could get my BIOS or any
                  > other programs to"look and find" my crashed HD. That's whne I bought the
                  > orig. SpinRite, which hung at 16.43 percent into the repair or whatever they
                  > called it.

                  Seems kind of odd. I mean, if the BIOS doesn't recognize a drive,
                  then neither will anything else. So somehow your BIOS has to be
                  seeing it.

                  > When I used the Regenerator it also "recognized" the crashed HD. I started
                  > the run on the bad drive but cut it off at one hour due to other
                  > constraints. As I mentioned in an earlier email, I did wish that the Regen
                  > had had a time bar or clock to kind of co-mmunicate with me--a back and
                  > forth thing.

                  It has a progress bar on all the versions I've used. It would tell
                  you how far it has scanned so you can change the offset if you have to
                  interrupt it. Then you could start where you last left it.

                  But tonight I will re-run the whole "trial" version of the
                  > Regen program, but would like to mention that all of these "recovery"
                  > programs require a boot from the "A" drive.

                  They don't "require" a boot from an "A" drive. It's just the most
                  commonly used method. Use a CD burning app and have it make a
                  bootable CDROM based on the floppy disk in the drive. Then you can
                  use the CD to run the program. I do this with many bootable
                  utilities. SpinRite 6 also allows you to boot from CD-R or even a USB
                  drive, which is what I've used.

                  If anyone can actually "see"
                  > their "C drive" and anything on it, it seems, therefore, to me, that they
                  > need to run scandisk and defrag. If this results in a failed attempt,
                  > meaning that if the Windows (version unknow) refuses to go further with the
                  > scandisk or defrag programs, then they must run the Regen program.

                  Well, Windows isn't too sophisticated when it comes to moving your
                  data from bad sections of the drive. That's why 3rd part programs
                  exist. While Windows may do it, there's no guarantee that your data
                  will be there when it's finished. HDD and SpinRite do this in a
                  fashion that allows you to have a high recovery rate and higher
                  probability of getting your data transferred to a safe spot instead of
                  a not-so-safe spot. Plus I've had many-a-time when Windows wouldn't
                  scan the drive correctly at all, prompting me to use HDD Regen with
                  great results.

                  I wouldn't recommend defragging anything outside of Windows or inside
                  of Windows if you believe your data to be at risk. Too many people
                  think that all bad sectors are from "physical" defects which isn't
                  entirely true.

                  But defragging doesn't care about the health of the data, only the
                  location. So it could have various problems reading clusters of data
                  and actually damage the data instead of optimizing it. The moving of
                  the data (if not read 100% correctly) will cause you to have possible
                  corruption of data.

                  It's
                  > merely this gray area that I've been noticing in the back-and-forth between
                  > members about "crashed" drives--I get the feeling that some can actually
                  > acquire their questionable "crashed" HD and data
                  > on it. If this is wrong, then they obviously can't do anything but fall
                  > back to Regen or try SpinRite as we did. And...yes...I still use SpinRite
                  > on my other HD's. Takes about 2 - 3 hours.
                  > Blake

                  If they can obtain their data by other means rather than using a
                  pay-for app, that's great. But if chkdsk or scandisk, etc. doesn't
                  take care of it for you and you've got a bad sector...your options are
                  limited.

                  You can back up your entire system and re-format and re-partition,
                  marking any sectors as bad with a utility of your choosing.

                  Or you can get a program designed to work with the drive exactly the
                  way it is, and perform its "treatment" without having to start from
                  scratch and/or restore from a backup.

                  I mean, in the end, whatever works - great. But I've just had so much
                  luck with HDD Regen getting my drives healthy again I've made it my
                  best recommendation. Sometimes it's unnecessary, but if you think
                  you've got some bad sectors and want to try to get that drive booting
                  again, I'd be looking at HDD Regen.
                • Carol Whitney
                  When ... Oh! How handy! ... Maybe it s that last that could be a problem; I don t know. I could inquire of my dealer. I m anything but a technician, though I
                  Message 8 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                    When
                    >On 8/24/05, Carol Whitney (that's me) <cwhitney@...> wrote:

                    > > Would it do old drives formatted under DOS?

                    At 15:26 05-08-24 -0500, Brian Binder replied:

                    >Yes it will do those drives as well. It doesn't care at all about
                    >formatting. You don't even have to have a formatted drive to use the
                    >software.

                    Oh! How handy!

                    >If it's an IDE drive (which worked fine in a 386), I'd simply plug it
                    >in as a secondary in a newer PC and have HDD Regen do a scan. You
                    >can scan the drive(s) from any PC so long as the BIOS and the
                    >program recognizes the drive(s).

                    Maybe it's that last that could be a problem; I don't know. I could
                    inquire of my dealer. I'm anything but a technician, though I did
                    low-level-format a few drives of mine way back when (for me, way back
                    when began around 1985/1986, but I didn't get that techie for a
                    couple of years, I think).

                    >I've grabbed drives from a 386 before and put them in a brand new PC,
                    >set them up as Master/Slaves and scanned things just fine.

                    THAT would be useful! I'm not sure I have room for a third hard drive
                    in my current PC, but maybe somebody else around here would have, or
                    maybe I could remove my second hard drive long enough to try the old
                    386 DOS 6.22-formatted one in mine. I doubt, though, I'm ready to try
                    such a thing, as the older I get, the more foggy my techie-mind gets
                    <g>.

                    (On the other hand, the conversations on the NoteTab forums might
                    sharpen me up just a bit <g>) Thanks a lot, Brian! I'm saving your
                    post. (Silly; I save them all <g>)

                    Thu, 25 Aug 2005 11:37:19
                    Madame PackRat
                    Carol Whitney
                    http://www.coherentdog.org/
                    *** I receive plain text only. To attach a file, notify me first. ***
                  • r. blake mooney
                    What I m saying is that most tech people I ve queried suggest using a floppy rather than a CD disk as the space required on either medium (to boot the program
                    Message 9 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                      What I'm saying is that most tech people I've queried suggest using a floppy rather than a CD disk as the space required on either medium (to boot the program with a floppy or disk) is small. Several other progams or files can be added to a floppy and all zipped, the thing dropped into your pocket and off you go with even your "great American novel" added.

                      The other thing is that many times the BIOS does get messed up, and after talking with SpinRite people a month back that's one of their main points: using the floppy (with all necessary start-up programs sufficient to run their product) to take over the computer and run their SpinRite. As to what lite-BIOS or quasi-BIOS they use I haven't a clue. Hacker's have no problem hitting people with malware or other bad stuff no matter how you defend against it; all predicted in Edgar Allen Poe's caveat: "Any secret code one man can write can be broken by another."

                      Due to health reasons I don't have a lot of time for hand-holding my computer. My "5-year-learning-curve" days are long over. The nature of any good program that I use is that it must work consistently, reliably and simply. I'll add that it therefore must be inexpensive. The first 3 here were once the beauty of the MAC: it met the criteria of consistency, reliability, and simplicity. So did German rockets and early jet planes. These same 3 reasons for existing prompted IBM to use the MAC to design their first desktop computer! But IBM never got the real message that is always tied to ET: the Electronic Truth states that only consistency, reliability, and simplicity will win the day. Everyone in Bangalore, India knows this, but only a few corporations here understand it. Gates says the "code is getting sloppy--it's too long--the programs are slowing down." So he brings in more brilliant engineers from the four corners of the earth. This fact is not being lost on Europeans
                      but esp. the billions of folks in the Far East. Worse, just think of this irony--maybe that town 28 miles East of Bagdhad, where they invented algebra and wrote "A Tale of Gilgamesh" 5300 years ago, maybe those people will agree to sign a "peace treaty with themselves" if the US agrees to set them up with a few Crays and 10000 PCs to write all the software for a new American-based commercial firm that competes with Microsoft. Crazier things have happened. One was me spending $5200 on 9 ZEROX publishing programs for a small press company I owned! Those original Ventura Pub products did then (and still do today) beat the heck out of any publishing programs I know on the market today. But ZEROX dropped them all and fired the brilliant engineers who built them in their spare time after working hours! Far-sightedness has never been the hallmark of American industry. MAC ended up copying these discarded pub programs and their sales took off.
                      Blake


                      Brian Binder <brian.binder@...> wrote:
                      On 8/25/05, r. blake mooney <mooney_rb@...> wrote:
                      > Brian,
                      > From my experience, which is very limited, I never could get my BIOS or any
                      > other programs to"look and find" my crashed HD. That's whne I bought the
                      > orig. SpinRite, which hung at 16.43 percent into the repair or whatever they
                      > called it.

                      Seems kind of odd. I mean, if the BIOS doesn't recognize a drive,
                      then neither will anything else. So somehow your BIOS has to be
                      seeing it.

                      > When I used the Regenerator it also "recognized" the crashed HD. I started
                      > the run on the bad drive but cut it off at one hour due to other
                      > constraints. As I mentioned in an earlier email, I did wish that the Regen
                      > had had a time bar or clock to kind of co-mmunicate with me--a back and
                      > forth thing.

                      It has a progress bar on all the versions I've used. It would tell
                      you how far it has scanned so you can change the offset if you have to
                      interrupt it. Then you could start where you last left it.

                      > But tonight I will re-run the whole "trial" version of the
                      > Regen program, but would like to mention that all of these > "recovery" programs require a boot from the "A" drive.

                      They don't "require" a boot from an "A" drive. It's just the most commonly used method. Use a CD burning app and have it make a bootable CDROM based on the floppy disk in the drive. Then you can use the CD to run the program. I do this with many bootable utilities. SpinRite 6 also allows you to boot from CD-R or even a USB drive, which is what I've used.



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                    • David Smart
                      I think there s confusion here between drives and partitions. BIOS might see your drive, but not the partitions on it, and especially not the formats in those
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                        I think there's confusion here between drives and partitions. BIOS might see your drive, but not the partitions on it, and especially not the formats in those partitions. Programs like fdisk, SpinRite, etc, are looking at the low-level recognition of the drive; programs like DOS, Windows, etc, are looking for the formatted partitions.

                        Dave S

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Brian Binder
                        To: ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 3:28 AM
                        Subject: Re: [NTO] Re: hope this isn't too far off-topic


                        On 8/25/05, r. blake mooney <mooney_rb@...> wrote:
                        > Brian,
                        > From my experience, which is very limited, I never could get my BIOS or any
                        > other programs to"look and find" my crashed HD. That's whne I bought the
                        > orig. SpinRite, which hung at 16.43 percent into the repair or whatever they
                        > called it.

                        Seems kind of odd. I mean, if the BIOS doesn't recognize a drive,
                        then neither will anything else. So somehow your BIOS has to be
                        seeing it.

                        > When I used the Regenerator it also "recognized" the crashed HD. I started
                        > the run on the bad drive but cut it off at one hour due to other
                        > constraints. As I mentioned in an earlier email, I did wish that the Regen
                        > had had a time bar or clock to kind of co-mmunicate with me--a back and
                        > forth thing.

                        It has a progress bar on all the versions I've used. It would tell
                        you how far it has scanned so you can change the offset if you have to
                        interrupt it. Then you could start where you last left it.

                        But tonight I will re-run the whole "trial" version of the
                        > Regen program, but would like to mention that all of these "recovery"
                        > programs require a boot from the "A" drive.

                        They don't "require" a boot from an "A" drive. It's just the most
                        commonly used method. Use a CD burning app and have it make a
                        bootable CDROM based on the floppy disk in the drive. Then you can
                        use the CD to run the program. I do this with many bootable
                        utilities. SpinRite 6 also allows you to boot from CD-R or even a USB
                        drive, which is what I've used.

                        If anyone can actually "see"
                        > their "C drive" and anything on it, it seems, therefore, to me, that they
                        > need to run scandisk and defrag. If this results in a failed attempt,
                        > meaning that if the Windows (version unknow) refuses to go further with the
                        > scandisk or defrag programs, then they must run the Regen program.

                        Well, Windows isn't too sophisticated when it comes to moving your
                        data from bad sections of the drive. That's why 3rd part programs
                        exist. While Windows may do it, there's no guarantee that your data
                        will be there when it's finished. HDD and SpinRite do this in a
                        fashion that allows you to have a high recovery rate and higher
                        probability of getting your data transferred to a safe spot instead of
                        a not-so-safe spot. Plus I've had many-a-time when Windows wouldn't
                        scan the drive correctly at all, prompting me to use HDD Regen with
                        great results.

                        I wouldn't recommend defragging anything outside of Windows or inside
                        of Windows if you believe your data to be at risk. Too many people
                        think that all bad sectors are from "physical" defects which isn't
                        entirely true.

                        But defragging doesn't care about the health of the data, only the
                        location. So it could have various problems reading clusters of data
                        and actually damage the data instead of optimizing it. The moving of
                        the data (if not read 100% correctly) will cause you to have possible
                        corruption of data.

                        It's
                        > merely this gray area that I've been noticing in the back-and-forth between
                        > members about "crashed" drives--I get the feeling that some can actually
                        > acquire their questionable "crashed" HD and data
                        > on it. If this is wrong, then they obviously can't do anything but fall
                        > back to Regen or try SpinRite as we did. And...yes...I still use SpinRite
                        > on my other HD's. Takes about 2 - 3 hours.
                        > Blake

                        If they can obtain their data by other means rather than using a
                        pay-for app, that's great. But if chkdsk or scandisk, etc. doesn't
                        take care of it for you and you've got a bad sector...your options are
                        limited.

                        You can back up your entire system and re-format and re-partition,
                        marking any sectors as bad with a utility of your choosing.

                        Or you can get a program designed to work with the drive exactly the
                        way it is, and perform its "treatment" without having to start from
                        scratch and/or restore from a backup.

                        I mean, in the end, whatever works - great. But I've just had so much
                        luck with HDD Regen getting my drives healthy again I've made it my
                        best recommendation. Sometimes it's unnecessary, but if you think
                        you've got some bad sectors and want to try to get that drive booting
                        again, I'd be looking at HDD Regen.


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                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Alec Burgess
                        ... Exactly: All I see in that section is my C: harddrive. ... That s a pity :-( ... It s not ... You lost me here ... I don t have a desktop system, just two
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 25, 2005
                          Brian:

                          > Let's make sure we're checking out the same section. Check out my
                          > screenshot here: http://www.bndservices.com/notetab/disks.jpg
                          >
                          > Is that what you see, but minus your USB drive?

                          Exactly: All I see in that section is my C: harddrive.

                          > I will tell you that the boot disk for HDD Regen does not
                          > recognize USB devices, so you would be out of luck if you kept it
                          > in the USB drive housing.

                          That's a pity :-(


                          > Personally if it were me (and the drive's warranty was not an
                          > issue)

                          It's not

                          > I'd take it out of the USB housing and plug it into the PC
                          > directly via the IDE or EIDE cable that's appropriate.

                          You lost me here ... I don't have a desktop system, just two
                          laptops. Is the above procedure possible with a laptop? I'm not
                          too bad with understanding software, but pretty lame when we get
                          to hardware.

                          > More times than not, my experience has taught me that the
                          > housings go bad far more than the drives. I've known people that
                          > have gone through countless housings.

                          That sounds like an avenue worth pursuing. Rather than just pitch
                          the drive and lose the data on it (not backed up unfortunately -
                          mostly I used the Maxtor to backup info from my C: drive and to
                          store music, videos and other large files) you're saying that I
                          might be able to get a computer repair shop to take the drive out
                          and put it in another housing, cross my fingers and maybe get
                          lucky?

                          > I'll keep my fingers crossed for some good fortune to come your
                          > way on this one! ;)



                          Regards ... Alec
                          --
                          ; ( ) { } [ ] \ | 9 0 + = () {} []


                          ---- Original Message ----
                          From: "Brian Binder" <brian.binder@...>
                          To: <ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 00:14
                          Subject: [gla: Re: [NTO] Re: hope this isn't too far
                          off-topic

                          > On 8/24/05, Alec Burgess <buralex@...> wrote:
                          >> Brian:
                          >>
                          >> I have an external 40 GB Maxtor drive connected to my
                          >> laptop which shows up in:
                          >> MyComputer-Manage-Device Manager-Disk drives as:
                          >> >>Maxtor 3000LE v01.00.00 USB Device<<
                          >>
                          >> but doesn't show up anywhere under
                          >> MyComputer-Manage-Storage-Logical Drives.
                        • Brian Binder
                          ... Yikes...that s not too good. Let s see if the USB is communicating with your laptop at all. Download this from my server:
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 26, 2005
                            Alec Burgess wrote:

                            > Exactly: All I see in that section is my C: harddrive.

                            Yikes...that's not too good. Let's see if the USB is communicating with
                            your laptop at all. Download this from my server:
                            http://www.bndservices.com/notetab/usbview.zip Run the EXE file
                            contained therein and tell me if the program detects the USB drive by
                            expanding all the USB entries...see the drive at all? Have you ever
                            tried the drive on a different laptop/PC?

                            > You lost me here ... I don't have a desktop system, just two
                            > laptops. Is the above procedure possible with a laptop? I'm not
                            > too bad with understanding software, but pretty lame when we get
                            > to hardware.

                            Sorry - didn't know we were talking about a laptop. It's a bit
                            different then. I have both so I can freely take a drive out of its
                            housing and try the actual drive itself without using the housing.

                            > That sounds like an avenue worth pursuing. Rather than just pitch
                            > the drive and lose the data on it (not backed up unfortunately -
                            > mostly I used the Maxtor to backup info from my C: drive and to
                            > store music, videos and other large files) you're saying that I
                            > might be able to get a computer repair shop to take the drive out
                            > and put it in another housing, cross my fingers and maybe get
                            > lucky?

                            Yep. I've grabbed people's drives and removed them from the housing.
                            You'll know if it's possible by hooking the IDE-based drive up directly
                            to a PC. If the PC can see it and copy information to it, (if it's got
                            a known good partition of course)
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