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Re: [NTO] PC power supply dead?

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  • Jody
    Hi alice ttlg, ... LOL! I had the exact same thought Chris did. I surely don t want to get into a Windows/Linux war here, but Linux and I do not get along
    Message 1 of 34 , Apr 1 8:08 AM
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      Hi alice ttlg,

      >This will do until I've worked a few more months and get me a
      >brand new PC and then I'll Linux this one.

      LOL! I had the exact same thought Chris did. <g> I surely don't
      want to get into a Windows/Linux war here, but Linux and I do not
      get along at all. I'm too "one sited" Windows blinded or
      whatever. I really don't have the time to learn Linux else I
      would Linux a machine I have sitting around. ;)

      Jason, you mentioned, "If you ever want to do PC repair work for
      others, a PS tester is a very good tool to have in your arsenal."

      From my electronics background I always figured a load had to be
      on the PS to test it and thanks for confirming it. I just never
      knew where to start looking for such a creature for a PC. I had
      even thought rigging up of some kind of pins extender so I could
      use my multimeter on them. But, for the price you mentioned, I'll
      search on pricewatch.com for one. (I have a low amp pwr supply
      that appeared to die, so I unplugged all the pwr connections and
      plugged them back in at it worked fine since. Faulty contacts,
      chip bits set/unset/hung, etc. can cause pwr supplies to prevent
      from coming up due to protection circuits. Just re-seating the
      connections can sometimes fix these problems just like re-seating
      a printed circuit board (PCB), your cards like modem, sound,
      mobo, etc.)

      alice ttlg; Safety 101... As far as shorting pins, or lets just
      say working with power of any kind, you never want to use both
      hands, especially when shorting power pins. The rule of thumb we
      were taught was to keep one hand in your pocket. If there is a
      high current (amps) in the path, you are making a short
      (conductor) directly across your heart via in one hand and out
      the other - heart attack, oops! ;)

      Make sure you are not grounded to anything either. As mentioned,
      use a screw driver when possible not touching anything metal with
      your free hand, soaking the other hand in water that is sprained,
      (use common sense!) etc. When they are female connectors (sockets
      - a plug is the male end) and small like your power switch I'd
      use one of the plastic coated paper clips with some of the
      plastic removed at both ends of course. You can also use a piece
      of coated single stranded wire like what is used for phone wire:
      not the phone to line wire (RJ11), they are multi-stranded and a
      pain to use.

      You really should know what you are shorting also. Normally, any
      switch that has on/off and ground or voltage running through, it
      is OK, and as long as it is low voltage like the -3VDC to -12VDC
      circuits in a computer. When in doubt, it's best not to do it.
      You certainly wouldn't fool around with 220/440VAC rectifiers
      (huge power converters AC-DC a lot of the time) doing stuff like
      this. <bg>

      Only electrical/electronic people will get a groaning grin out of
      this: Those rectifiers are always making a humming sound. Do you
      know exactly why they hum? They forgot the words, so they hum. ;)

      See ya in the funnies,
      Jody Adair, Prov. 15:15

      Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves
      for they shall never cease to be amused.
      http://www.clean-funnies.com
    • Barry
      All ISPs have a whitelist and whatever they agree to put on it is allowed access through their servers. A number of people in a forum that I write to are
      Message 34 of 34 , Apr 9 7:32 PM
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        All ISPs have a 'whitelist' and whatever they agree to put on it is allowed
        access through their servers. A number of people in a forum that I write to
        are AOL members and my mail was originally classified as spam until their
        addresses, at my request, were added to the AOL whitelist. It's a pain I
        know but a way to circumvent the system.

        Take care Barry UK

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Jeff Scism" <scismgenie@...>
        To: <ntb-OffTopic@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, April 09, 2005 9:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [NTO] PC power supply dead?


        >
        > One of the reasons I left AOL was because they have built in internet
        > filtering, even of email. I do genealogy and I found that "key words" in
        > the filters were things like Boy, sex, child, address, etc. things
        > VERY commonly used in genealogy.
        >
        > AOL uses "proximity" filtering, and sometimes the real stuff gets
        > through and the stuff I want to see never does.
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