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Re: [NTO] dip switches

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  • Scott Fordin
    I m a little confused. If I understand you correctly, you re currently booting from your 2GB C drive, and you want to switch everything over to your new 12GB D
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 28, 2001
      I'm a little confused. If I understand you correctly, you're currently
      booting from your 2GB C drive, and you want to switch everything over
      to your new 12GB D drive, and there is currently nothing on the D drive.
      Is this correct?

      If so, probably the easiest thing to do would be to:

      1. Shut down your computer.

      2. Open the computer, and configure the C drive
      to be the master and the D drive to be the slave.

      To do this, put both drives on the same flat
      IDE ribbon cable, with the C drive first in line
      and D second. Set the jumpers on the drives to be
      master and slave respectively; C master, D slave.
      C is probably already set to be master, so the
      only drive you need to change might be D. The
      drives should be labeled so you can see how to
      set the jumpers.

      3. Close your computer, start it up, but go the BIOS
      setup before Windows loads.

      4. Verify that the BIOS sees the new hard drive. You
      may need to use a "detect hard drive" command or
      suchlike, but most modern BIOS will just do it
      automatically.

      5. Exit the BIOS setup and boot into Windows normally
      from the C drive.

      6. Format the new 12GB D drive using the "Transfer
      System Files" option. Make sure you DON'T format
      your current C drive!

      7. Use the View->Options menu item in Windows
      Explorer, and verify that Explorer is configured
      to show all system and hidden files.

      8. Copy everything on drive C to drive D.

      9. Exit Windows and shut down your computer.

      10. Open the computer, and swap the drives -- that
      is, put the new 12GB drive first in line on the
      IDE cable and the old 2GB second. Set the jumpers
      on the 12GB drive to be master, and the 2GB drive
      to be slave.

      11. Close your computer, start it up, but go to the BIOS
      setup before Windows loads.

      12. Verify that the new drive configuration has been
      detected, and that the new 12GB drive is detected
      as the primary IDE hard drive.

      13. Exit the BIOS setup and boot into Windows normally.
      You should now be booted from the new 12GB C drive.

      Note that this sets up your new 12GB drive to be drive C.
      Windows, particularly the NT variants, will only load from
      drive C, so booting from D will not work except with a boot
      utility like BootMagic.

      Hope this helps.

      Scott

      At 16:45 1/27/2001 -0600, you wrote:
      >Hi All!
      >
      >I am currently running software from drive c and would like to utilize a
      >new 12gig HD namely D as a primary hard drive.
      >
      >Right now everything including my internet setup is working from this HD
      >2gig drive and I want to have the whole works on this new drive D.
      >
      >Do I have to set the dip switches on the motherboard and where exactly
      >would I find them? Is there another means by which this switchover can be done.
      >
      >This interested mind would like to know.
      >
      >Thank you each one for your interest and help.
      >
      >Kind regards,
      >Joe
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
    • Jim Hall
      Scott, ... FWIW, There is no dedicated connector for a C & D or MASTER and SLAVE drive on an IDE Controller. Addressing is accomplished with the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 28, 2001
        Scott,

        At 09:17 AM 1/28/01, you wrote:
        > To do this, put both drives on the same flat
        > IDE ribbon cable, with the C drive first in line
        > and D second. Set the jumpers on the drives to be
        > master and slave respectively; C master, D slave.
        > C is probably already set to be master, so the
        > only drive you need to change might be D. The
        > drives should be labeled so you can see how to
        > set the jumpers.


        FWIW, There is no dedicated connector for a "C" & "D" or "MASTER" and
        "SLAVE" drive on an IDE Controller. Addressing is accomplished with the
        "MASTER/SLAVE" jumpers. The only criteria for which drive goes to which
        connector, is which drive is on top and how the cable is routed. Simply
        changing the jumpers is all that is required to change the drive from a "C"
        to a "D" etc.

        The only drives that are connector sensitive are the "A" and "B" drives
        where the addressing is done via the cable connectors and there are no
        "MASTER/SLAVE" jumpers on floppy drives.

        Just thought I'd mention it.

        Regards,

        Jim
      • Scott Fordin
        ... Jim, You re right in saying that there s no dedicated C, D, Master or Slave on an IDE controller itself. I m sorry if I gave the impression that the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 28, 2001
          At 14:27 1/28/2001 -0800, you wrote:
          >FWIW, There is no dedicated connector for a "C" & "D" or "MASTER" and
          >"SLAVE" drive on an IDE Controller. Addressing is accomplished with the
          >"MASTER/SLAVE" jumpers. The only criteria for which drive goes to which
          >connector, is which drive is on top and how the cable is routed. Simply
          >changing the jumpers is all that is required to change the drive from a "C"
          >to a "D" etc.
          >
          >The only drives that are connector sensitive are the "A" and "B" drives
          >where the addressing is done via the cable connectors and there are no
          >"MASTER/SLAVE" jumpers on floppy drives.

          Jim,

          You're right in saying that there's no dedicated C, D, Master
          or Slave on an IDE controller itself. I'm sorry if I gave the
          impression that the jumpers for master/slave were anywhere but
          on the IDE drive itself.

          Regarding your second point about the order in which devices
          are connected to the IDE ribbon cable, I seem to recall having
          problems with this, particularly on several older machines. It
          could very well be that I'm having a senior moment though (I'll
          be 42 next month, so I'm officially a geezer now), and confusing
          floppy controller errors with hard drive errors. More telling is
          that I'm probably recalling errors I've had with pre-IDE drives.
          In any case, the habit of putting the first drive in line first
          is hard-wired in me now. You are correct though; I mean, on an
          IDE drive, the controller is built into the drive itself, so
          cable order shouldn't matter. Thanks for setting me straight.

          Regards,

          Scott
          "Computers always work in a consistent and predictable
          manner... except when they don't..."
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