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Re: [nslu2-linux] FAT, FAT32 etc

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  • Jason Cooper
    ... Sure can. ... Two scenarios (I have the parts for the serial converter on my desk, so forgive the fact that I am not too far along yet :) 1.) The stock
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 19, 2004
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      Matt McNeill (matt_mcneill@...) scribbled:
      > One of the major disadvantages in the reviews for this item (Tom's
      > Hardware) is that to attach your USB drive it requires reformatting.
      > It's kinda permanent really if you have one of the ubiquitous Win32
      > machines. Furthermore, if like me, you have already got 100Gb+ on your
      > Maxtor 250, this device is a waste of time unless you are prepared to
      > shell out for another drive.
      >
      > Now, if I remember rightly from my days of playing around with Linux
      > on dual boot machines, it is possible for linux to mount FAT/FAT32
      > drives.

      Sure can.

      >
      > So, if you will excuse my ignorance, what are the hurdles that face
      > the idea of booting from a FAT/FAT32 mount rather than an ext3 linux
      > mount?
      >

      Two scenarios (I have the parts for the serial converter on my desk, so
      forgive the fact that I am not too far along yet :)

      1.) The stock kernel allows modules
      Get the stock kernel source and create the vfat, etc modules.
      create a new initrd image with the modules included.
      mod some scripts to allow mounting the drive w/o formatting.
      2.) No module support in stock kernel
      Get the stock kernel sources, compile a new kernel w/ vfat
      support.
      Replace the kernel with the new one.
      modify scripts etc...

      > Or even simply mounting a FAT/FAT32 drive to share it as normal as a
      > second drive having booted from a ext3 primary drive?

      Getting any linux kernel to view and use a windows partition is easy (no
      booting from it), getting the Linksys generated apps to work with it is
      another matter. Which is why my approach is to not even bother with the
      provided apps other than what is necessary in the kernel to see the
      hardware.

      hth,

      Cooper.
    • Craig Procter
      Hi all, my $0.02 as a Windows user - any chance for NTFS support to be added as well please? No need to boot from the drive, but if Windows users can plug in
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 19, 2004
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        Hi all,
         
        my $0.02 as a Windows user - any chance for NTFS support to be added as well please?  No need to boot from the drive, but if Windows users can plug in their existing USB HDDs and not have to reformat then the device suddenly has a heck of a lot more usage for them (imho).  Really seems to be a Linksys oversight on that point.
         
        regards,
         
        Craig
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, August 20, 2004 6:02 AM
        Subject: Re: [nslu2-linux] FAT, FAT32 etc

        Matt McNeill (matt_mcneill@...) scribbled:
        > One of the major disadvantages in the reviews for this item (Tom's
        > Hardware) is that to attach your USB drive it requires reformatting.
        > It's kinda permanent really if you have one of the ubiquitous Win32
        > machines. Furthermore, if like me, you have already got 100Gb+ on your
        > Maxtor 250, this device is a waste of time unless you are prepared to
        > shell out for another drive.
        >
        > Now, if I remember rightly from my days of playing around with Linux
        > on dual boot machines, it is possible for linux to mount FAT/FAT32
        > drives.

        Sure can.

        >
        > So, if you will excuse my ignorance, what are the hurdles that face
        > the idea of booting from a FAT/FAT32 mount rather than an ext3 linux
        > mount?
        >

        Two scenarios (I have the parts for the serial converter on my desk, so
        forgive the fact that I am not too far along yet :)

        1.) The stock kernel allows modules
              Get the stock kernel source and create the vfat, etc modules.
              create a new initrd image with the modules included.
              mod some scripts to allow mounting the drive w/o formatting.
        2.) No module support in stock kernel
              Get the stock kernel sources, compile a new kernel w/ vfat
              support.
              Replace the kernel with the new one.
              modify scripts etc...

        > Or even simply mounting a FAT/FAT32 drive to share it as normal as a
        > second drive having booted from a ext3 primary drive?

        Getting any linux kernel to view and use a windows partition is easy (no
        booting from it), getting the Linksys generated apps to work with it is
        another matter.  Which is why my approach is to not even bother with the
        provided apps other than what is necessary in the kernel to see the
        hardware. 

        hth,

        Cooper.

      • Jason Cooper
        ... Or a bad marketing attempt at lock-in... :) Just looked at 2.6.8.1 kernel, NTFS read support is fine. However, write support is restricted, but safe. By
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 19, 2004
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          Craig Procter (craigwp@...) scribbled:
          > Hi all,
          >
          > my $0.02 as a Windows user - any chance for NTFS support to be added as well
          > please? No need to boot from the drive, but if Windows users can plug in
          > their existing USB HDDs and not have to reformat then the device suddenly
          > has a heck of a lot more usage for them (imho). Really seems to be a
          > Linksys oversight on that point.

          Or a bad marketing attempt at lock-in... :)

          Just looked at 2.6.8.1 kernel, NTFS read support is fine. However,
          write support is restricted, but safe. By restricted, you can write to
          files that already exist, as long as the new data is exactly the same
          length. I read this as "it ain't ready" :( Sorry.

          Cooper.
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