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Re: [nslu2-linux] dmesg: attempt to access beyond end of device

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  • vasanag
    That is very strange. I haven t changed anything on my system and if I remember well I never had such kind of problems. My system is running almost four
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 4, 2011
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      That is very strange.  I haven't changed anything on my system and if I remember well I never had such kind of problems.  My system is running almost four years now.

      The mount command returns:

      # mount
      /dev/root on /initrd type jffs2 (rw)
      /dev/sda1 on / type ext3 (rw)
      proc on /proc type proc (rw)
      usbdevfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbdevfs (rw)
      /dev/sda1 on /share/flash/data type ext3 (rw)
      /dev/sda2 on /share/flash/conf type ext3 (rw,sync)
      /dev/sdb1 on /share/hdd/data/USB_D1 type ext3 (rw)



      So, if device 08:01 indicates /dev/sda1, then this is the USB flash disk I have attached on port 2. 

      Do you have any idea about this?  Is there any possibility to have a malfunctioning flash disk?

      Thanks for your assistance.



      On 03/03/2011 08:31 PM, nslu@... wrote:
       

      On Thu, Mar 03, 2011 at 07:19:04PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
      > Gurus,
      >
      > the dmesg command among the others returns the following:
      >
      > ................................
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=4199168, limit=750913
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=33559452, limit=750913
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=536887200, limit=750913
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=4198548, limit=750913
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=4199168, limit=750913
      > attempt to access beyond end of device
      > 08:01: rw=1, want=33559452, limit=750913
      >
      > Do you have any idea about this?
      >
      > My nslu2 runs UNSLUNG 6.10 and I have attached an ext3 formatted USB disk.
      >

      i would double check your formatting and partitions, the 08:01 indicates
      the first block device partition 1. my guess is that you have a small
      partition and a filesystem that thinks it is larger than the partition it
      is stored on

      this is most likely caused by formatting the disk then partitioning it
      with a tool like fdisk. i would recommend you try (if possible) wiping
      the disc, partitioning it and then formatting the disk again

      if i remeber my device names corectly this should be /dev/sda or
      /dev/sda1 for the first partition


    • nslu@pocketnix.org
      ... It is posible the flash drive is malfunctioning, i have just recently thrown out a bunch of usb disks that were doing odd things that were a number of
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 4, 2011
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        On Fri, Mar 04, 2011 at 10:20:52PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
        > That is very strange. I haven't changed anything on my system and
        > if I remember well I never had such kind of problems. My system is
        > running almost four years now.
        >
        > The mount command returns:
        >
        > # mount
        > /dev/root on /initrd
        > type jffs2 (rw)
        > /dev/sda1 on / type ext3
        > (rw)
        > proc on /proc type proc (rw)
        > usbdevfs on
        > /proc/bus/usb type
        > usbdevfs (rw)
        > /dev/sda1 on
        > /share/flash/data type
        > ext3 (rw)
        > /dev/sda2 on
        > /share/flash/conf type
        > ext3 (rw,sync)
        > /dev/sdb1 on
        > /share/hdd/data/USB_D1
        > type ext3 (rw)
        >
        >
        >
        > So, if device 08:01 indicates /dev/sda1, then this is the USB flash
        > disk I have attached on port 2.
        >
        > Do you have any idea about this? Is there any possibility to have a
        > malfunctioning flash disk?
        >
        > Thanks for your assistance.

        It is posible the flash drive is malfunctioning, i have just recently
        thrown out a bunch of usb disks that were doing odd things that were a
        number of years old. i could only recommend trying it in another PC for
        a period of time and seeing if you get the same errors. if so that
        would indicate the usb drive is faulty. otherwise i have no idea as it
        appears your mounts are in order and as you said it has been working
        for a number of years
      • vasanag
        ... So, if the flash disk is damaged, is there any way to clone it to a new one? Can I use a tool like dd or gddrescue to make the cloning? Or, a full system
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 5, 2011
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          On 03/05/2011 12:17 AM, nslu@... wrote:
           

          On Fri, Mar 04, 2011 at 10:20:52PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
          > That is very strange. I haven't changed anything on my system and
          > if I remember well I never had such kind of problems. My system is
          > running almost four years now.
          >
          > The mount command returns:
          >
          > # mount
          > /dev/root on /initrd
          > type jffs2 (rw)
          > /dev/sda1 on / type ext3
          > (rw)
          > proc on /proc type proc (rw)
          > usbdevfs on
          > /proc/bus/usb type
          > usbdevfs (rw)
          > /dev/sda1 on
          > /share/flash/data type
          > ext3 (rw)
          > /dev/sda2 on
          > /share/flash/conf type
          > ext3 (rw,sync)
          > /dev/sdb1 on
          > /share/hdd/data/USB_D1
          > type ext3 (rw)
          >
          >
          >
          > So, if device 08:01 indicates /dev/sda1, then this is the USB flash
          > disk I have attached on port 2.
          >
          > Do you have any idea about this? Is there any possibility to have a
          > malfunctioning flash disk?
          >
          > Thanks for your assistance.

          It is posible the flash drive is malfunctioning, i have just recently
          thrown out a bunch of usb disks that were doing odd things that were a
          number of years old. i could only recommend trying it in another PC for
          a period of time and seeing if you get the same errors. if so that
          would indicate the usb drive is faulty. otherwise i have no idea as it
          appears your mounts are in order and as you said it has been working
          for a number of years

          So, if the flash disk is damaged, is there any way to clone it to a new one?  Can I use a tool like dd or gddrescue to make the cloning?  Or, a full system installation is needed? 

          tia

          vasanag


        • nslu@pocketnix.org
          ... Definitely not saying it is damaged (just a possibility). but if it is cp should be fine and the way i would do it as any file that is corrupt should
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 5, 2011
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            On Sat, Mar 05, 2011 at 02:59:28PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
            > On 03/05/2011 12:17 AM, nslu@... wrote:
            >
            > So, if the flash disk is damaged, is there any way to clone it to a
            > new one? Can I use a tool like dd or gddrescue to make the cloning?
            > Or, a full system installation is needed?

            Definitely not saying it is damaged (just a possibility). but if it is
            cp should be fine and the way i would do it as any file that is corrupt
            should generate an error when its blocks are read. dd or gddrescue may
            also work but damaged blocks are just going to be zeroed when copy
            leaving you with damaged files, if its the root fs or a system
            critical fs starting from scratch would be best and just tar up your
            config dir

            keep in mind this isnt a nslu specific problem, you may want to try
            asking on some generic linux forums as well
          • vasanag
            ... After contacting some other linux forums, I made a backup of the flash disk, using ddrescue, and then I checked the filesystem, using fsck. The fsck fixed
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 9, 2011
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              On 03/05/2011 03:50 PM, nslu@... wrote:
               

              On Sat, Mar 05, 2011 at 02:59:28PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
              > On 03/05/2011 12:17 AM, nslu@... wrote:
              >
              > So, if the flash disk is damaged, is there any way to clone it to a
              > new one? Can I use a tool like dd or gddrescue to make the cloning?
              > Or, a full system installation is needed?

              Definitely not saying it is damaged (just a possibility). but if it is
              cp should be fine and the way i would do it as any file that is corrupt
              should generate an error when its blocks are read. dd or gddrescue may
              also work but damaged blocks are just going to be zeroed when copy
              leaving you with damaged files, if its the root fs or a system
              critical fs starting from scratch would be best and just tar up your
              config dir

              keep in mind this isnt a nslu specific problem, you may want to try
              asking on some generic linux forums as well

              After contacting some other linux forums, I made a backup of the flash disk, using ddrescue, and then I checked the filesystem, using fsck.  The fsck fixed a lot of problems and the system is working perfectly, at the moment. 

              BUT, how can I be sure that everything is working correctly?  Can I trust my system after this repair?  Or, should I install everything from scratch?

              tia


            • nslu@pocketnix.org
              ... Hi cant give you a definate yes or no. me best practices would say back up the configs and start again just to be sure. but if its a non vital system you
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 10, 2011
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                On Wed, Mar 09, 2011 at 08:55:16PM +0200, vasanag wrote:
                > After contacting some other linux forums, I made a backup of the
                > flash disk, using ddrescue, and then I checked the filesystem, using
                > fsck. The fsck fixed a lot of problems and the system is working
                > perfectly, at the moment.
                >
                > BUT, how can I be sure that everything is working correctly? Can I
                > trust my system after this repair? Or, should I install everything
                > from scratch?

                Hi

                cant give you a definate yes or no. me "best practices" would say back
                up the configs and start again just to be sure. but if its a non vital
                system you are probably fine to let it run till something breaks (eg a
                daemon not running)


                just boot it up, confirm everything working and let it run if you feel
                safe doing it

                if you had non system files (pictures/moives) on that flash disk this
                may be a good time to look at how you do backups. a 6 month old file
                an be better than no file at all
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