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NSLU2 alternative? Foxconn R10-S4

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  • Ralph&Maria Finch
    Foxconn R10-S4 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012 Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug? - Low power, fanless (reviewer
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 14, 2011
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      Foxconn R10-S4

      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012

      Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?

      • Low power, fanless (reviewer says "draws 35 watts at idle")
      • small form factor
      • install any OS you like
      • 1 internal & 1 external storage bays SATA 3.0Gb/s
      • onboard video
      • Realtek 8100C(10/100Mbps) LAN
      • 2 front 4 rear USB (2.0 I assume)
      I would prefer something a little more stripped and lower power, nevertheless this seems to be a contender...

    • dystopianrebel
      ... It s too large for my taste. For the same money (but used), I prefer something like the DNS-323 or the Sheeva Plug.
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 15, 2011
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        --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph&Maria Finch" <ralphmariafinch@...> wrote:
        >
        > Foxconn R10-S4
        >
        > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012
        >
        > Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?

        It's too large for my taste. For the same money (but used), I prefer something like the DNS-323 or the Sheeva Plug.
      • edmondsdominic
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 15, 2011
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          ... or ReadyNAS; I have the two alongside each other. The ReadyNAS can be noisy and Netgear are a bit precious about their 'nix implementation. My Slug is still solid as a rock: Linux slug 2.6.18-6-ixp4xx #1 Sun Feb 21 09:05:05 UTC 2010 armv5tel GNU/Linux with 2 x WD 1.5TB drives

          --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "dystopianrebel" <dystopianrebel@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph&Maria Finch" <ralphmariafinch@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Foxconn R10-S4
          > >
          > > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012
          > >
          > > Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?
          >
          > It's too large for my taste. For the same money (but used), I prefer something like the DNS-323 or the Sheeva Plug.
        • curiously_unique
          In fact, the Seagate Dockstar is considered an interesting alternative to the NSLU2. Low in electrical power consumption (5 to 8 watts, they say), small,
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 15, 2011
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            In fact, the Seagate Dockstar is considered an interesting alternative to the NSLU2. Low in electrical power consumption (5 to 8 watts, they say), small, fanless, and quite fast. Its hardware is compatible to the SheevaPlug, but it's built as a NAS device specifically. The original firmware is rather restricted, but the good thing is that this device can run a regular Linux distribution (compiled for the ARM platform) from USB memory stick or even completely from internal flash if it's small enough. A pre-compiled Debian distribution is available, also Ubuntu, and of course it runs Plugbox Linux (Arch Linux based, originally for Sheevaplug) as well, and even OpenWRT, if you like.

            Sounds like advertising, I guess. Probably I forgot about some downside: Unlike the NSLU2, the Dockstar's RTC is not equipped, so the device doesn't know what time it is. If you're not afraid to wield a soldering iron, this can be fixed, though. And it doesn't look quite as good as the NSLU2 if there is no hard disk attached to the docking port.

            But still, the Dockstar became hugely popular here in Germany - so popular that it's sold out almost everywhere, and the remaining few have at least tripled in price. Rumors say that Seagate initially considered the product a failure - which it pretty much was, with its original firmware - and sold it cheaply. Then some tech-savvy people realized the hardware's potential, and as a result, Seagate raised the price substantially.
            I think there are still ways to get a cheap Dockstar in the US, though. If you decide to buy one, take care: Don't let it connect to the internet before you have gained access to it - otherwise the default root password will be lost.
          • oddballhero
            The only problem with the Dockstar as mentioned in the NSLU2-General forum is that it has been discontinued so it is in the same category now as the NSLU2.
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 15, 2011
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              The only problem with the Dockstar as mentioned in the NSLU2-General forum is that it has been discontinued so it is in the same category now as the NSLU2. The other Seagate Alternatives are still around like the Go-flex net and home which can also be modified like the Dockstar and have some sata interfaces. Right now the Pogoplug V2 is on sale and works the same way as the Dockstar http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/676439-REG/Pogoplug_POGOE02_Multimedia_Sharing_Device.html . I just ordered one as a backup and my collection of Dockstars and Pogoplugs have been working continuosly without problems for a year now. I also ordered one of the atom systems from newegg that was mentioned in the original posts. Right now is an exciting time for small system users since we have so many choices. I am just waiting now to see what the actual reviews are for the Dreamplug before I buy one and probably will get an OpenRD-Ultimate in the future. Right now I have installed u-boot on one of my Dockstars to run a custom kernel I compiled. MWester in another post indicated being able to install SlugOS onto a sheevaplug and I will try some time to do the same thing on the pogoplug.

              --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "curiously_unique" <curiously_unique@...> wrote:
              >
              > In fact, the Seagate Dockstar is considered an interesting alternative to the NSLU2. Low in electrical power consumption (5 to 8 watts, they say), small, fanless, and quite fast. Its hardware is compatible to the SheevaPlug, but it's built as a NAS device specifically. The original firmware is rather restricted, but the good thing is that this device can run a regular Linux distribution (compiled for the ARM platform) from USB memory stick or even completely from internal flash if it's small enough. A pre-compiled Debian distribution is available, also Ubuntu, and of course it runs Plugbox Linux (Arch Linux based, originally for Sheevaplug) as well, and even OpenWRT, if you like.
              >
              > Sounds like advertising, I guess. Probably I forgot about some downside: Unlike the NSLU2, the Dockstar's RTC is not equipped, so the device doesn't know what time it is. If you're not afraid to wield a soldering iron, this can be fixed, though. And it doesn't look quite as good as the NSLU2 if there is no hard disk attached to the docking port.
              >
              > But still, the Dockstar became hugely popular here in Germany - so popular that it's sold out almost everywhere, and the remaining few have at least tripled in price. Rumors say that Seagate initially considered the product a failure - which it pretty much was, with its original firmware - and sold it cheaply. Then some tech-savvy people realized the hardware's potential, and as a result, Seagate raised the price substantially.
              > I think there are still ways to get a cheap Dockstar in the US, though. If you decide to buy one, take care: Don't let it connect to the internet before you have gained access to it - otherwise the default root password will be lost.
              >
            • oddballhero
              Not that I am complaining, because I actually have a use for it, but it does come with a fan. It beats the $64 I was going to spend for an ITX atom
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 15, 2011
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                Not that I am complaining, because I actually have a use for it, but it does come with a fan. It beats the $64 I was going to spend for an ITX atom motherboard and $39 case. I don't complain much about noise since my Pro-Liant Servers are pretty noisy.

                --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph&Maria Finch" <ralphmariafinch@...> wrote:
                >
                > Foxconn R10-S4
                >
                > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012
                >
                > Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?
                >
                >
                > - Low power, fanless (reviewer says "draws 35 watts at idle")
                > - small form factor
                > - install any OS you like
                > - 1 internal & 1 external storage bays SATA 3.0Gb/s
                > - onboard video
                > - Realtek 8100C(10/100Mbps) LAN
                > - 2 front 4 rear USB (2.0 I assume)
                >
                > I would prefer something a little more stripped and lower power,
                > nevertheless this seems to be a contender...
                >
              • stripwax
                The fit pc (www.fit-pc.com) is an interesting device, because it is the same size as an nslu2, has an internal 2.5 sata bay, consumes 5w or so when idling
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 16, 2011
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                  The fit pc (www.fit-pc.com) is an interesting device, because it is the same size as an nslu2, has an internal 2.5" sata bay, consumes 5w or so when idling (max 8w, if I remember correctly), but is essentially a standard 'intel pc', with 6usb, memory card slot, ethernet and dvi/hdmi video/ it's certainly not as cheap as many of the alternatives, but a good example of power-efficient pc design. It's basically a micro-sized netbook without the keyboard or lcd.

                  --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "oddballhero" <avaca@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The only problem with the Dockstar as mentioned in the NSLU2-General forum is that it has been discontinued so it is in the same category now as the NSLU2. The other Seagate Alternatives are still around like the Go-flex net and home which can also be modified like the Dockstar and have some sata interfaces. Right now the Pogoplug V2 is on sale and works the same way as the Dockstar http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/676439-REG/Pogoplug_POGOE02_Multimedia_Sharing_Device.html . I just ordered one as a backup and my collection of Dockstars and Pogoplugs have been working continuosly without problems for a year now. I also ordered one of the atom systems from newegg that was mentioned in the original posts. Right now is an exciting time for small system users since we have so many choices. I am just waiting now to see what the actual reviews are for the Dreamplug before I buy one and probably will get an OpenRD-Ultimate in the future. Right now I have installed u-boot on one of my Dockstars to run a custom kernel I compiled. MWester in another post indicated being able to install SlugOS onto a sheevaplug and I will try some time to do the same thing on the pogoplug.
                  >
                  > --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "curiously_unique" <curiously_unique@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > In fact, the Seagate Dockstar is considered an interesting alternative to the NSLU2. Low in electrical power consumption (5 to 8 watts, they say), small, fanless, and quite fast. Its hardware is compatible to the SheevaPlug, but it's built as a NAS device specifically. The original firmware is rather restricted, but the good thing is that this device can run a regular Linux distribution (compiled for the ARM platform) from USB memory stick or even completely from internal flash if it's small enough. A pre-compiled Debian distribution is available, also Ubuntu, and of course it runs Plugbox Linux (Arch Linux based, originally for Sheevaplug) as well, and even OpenWRT, if you like.
                  > >
                  > > Sounds like advertising, I guess. Probably I forgot about some downside: Unlike the NSLU2, the Dockstar's RTC is not equipped, so the device doesn't know what time it is. If you're not afraid to wield a soldering iron, this can be fixed, though. And it doesn't look quite as good as the NSLU2 if there is no hard disk attached to the docking port.
                  > >
                  > > But still, the Dockstar became hugely popular here in Germany - so popular that it's sold out almost everywhere, and the remaining few have at least tripled in price. Rumors say that Seagate initially considered the product a failure - which it pretty much was, with its original firmware - and sold it cheaply. Then some tech-savvy people realized the hardware's potential, and as a result, Seagate raised the price substantially.
                  > > I think there are still ways to get a cheap Dockstar in the US, though. If you decide to buy one, take care: Don't let it connect to the internet before you have gained access to it - otherwise the default root password will be lost.
                  > >
                  >
                • Doug
                  The fit PC is cute but way too expensive. Base price is $300. Needs to be less than $200 to be a serious contender but it does have much more capability. It
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 16, 2011
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                    The fit PC is cute but way too expensive. Base price is $300. Needs to be less than $200 to be a serious contender but it does have much more capability. It could make a nice multimedia box if it could keep up with 1080P. It has HDMI video output.
                     


                    From: stripwax <dave@...>
                    To: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wed, February 16, 2011 10:29:24 AM
                    Subject: [nslu2-linux] Re: NSLU2 alternative? Dockstar, maybe

                     

                    The fit pc (www.fit-pc.com) is an interesting device, because it is the same size as an nslu2, has an internal 2.5" sata bay, consumes 5w or so when idling (max 8w, if I remember correctly), but is essentially a standard 'intel pc', with 6usb, memory card slot, ethernet and dvi/hdmi video/ it's certainly not as cheap as many of the alternatives, but a good example of power-efficient pc design. It's basically a micro-sized netbook without the keyboard or lcd.

                    --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "oddballhero" <avaca@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The only problem with the Dockstar as mentioned in the NSLU2-General forum is that it has been discontinued so it is in the same category now as the NSLU2. The other Seagate Alternatives are still around like the Go-flex net and home which can also be modified like the Dockstar and have some sata interfaces. Right now the Pogoplug V2 is on sale and works the same way as the Dockstar http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/676439-REG/Pogoplug_POGOE02_Multimedia_Sharing_Device.html . I just ordered one as a backup and my collection of Dockstars and Pogoplugs have been working continuosly without problems for a year now. I also ordered one of the atom systems from newegg that was mentioned in the original posts. Right now is an exciting time for small system users since we have so many choices. I am just waiting now to see what the actual reviews are for the Dreamplug before I buy one and probably will get an OpenRD-Ultimate in the future. Right now I have installed u-boot on one of my Dockstars to run a custom kernel I compiled. MWester in another post indicated being able to install SlugOS onto a sheevaplug and I will try some time to do the same thing on the pogoplug.
                    >
                    > --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "curiously_unique" <curiously_unique@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > In fact, the Seagate Dockstar is considered an interesting alternative to the NSLU2. Low in electrical power consumption (5 to 8 watts, they say), small, fanless, and quite fast. Its hardware is compatible to the SheevaPlug, but it's built as a NAS device specifically. The original firmware is rather restricted, but the good thing is that this device can run a regular Linux distribution (compiled for the ARM platform) from USB memory stick or even completely from internal flash if it's small enough. A pre-compiled Debian distribution is available, also Ubuntu, and of course it runs Plugbox Linux (Arch Linux based, originally for Sheevaplug) as well, and even OpenWRT, if you like.
                    > >
                    > > Sounds like advertising, I guess. Probably I forgot about some downside: Unlike the NSLU2, the Dockstar's RTC is not equipped, so the device doesn't know what time it is. If you're not afraid to wield a soldering iron, this can be fixed, though. And it doesn't look quite as good as the NSLU2 if there is no hard disk attached to the docking port.
                    > >
                    > > But still, the Dockstar became hugely popular here in Germany - so popular that it's sold out almost everywhere, and the remaining few have at least tripled in price. Rumors say that Seagate initially considered the product a failure - which it pretty much was, with its original firmware - and sold it cheaply. Then some tech-savvy people realized the hardware's potential, and as a result, Seagate raised the price substantially.
                    > > I think there are still ways to get a cheap Dockstar in the US, though. If you decide to buy one, take care: Don't let it connect to the internet before you have gained access to it - otherwise the default root password will be lost.
                    > >
                    >

                  • Hardy Griech
                    My personal favorite is the QNAP TS-110 (http://www.qnap.com/pro_detail_feature.asp?p_id=136). Thanks to Martin Michlmayr (http://www.cyrius.com/debian/)
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 17, 2011
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                      My personal favorite is the QNAP TS-110
                      (http://www.qnap.com/pro_detail_feature.asp?p_id=136). Thanks to Martin
                      Michlmayr (http://www.cyrius.com/debian/) replacement of the original
                      firmware with Debian is a snap.

                      Consumption is around 10W if the HDD is running (WD green) and 5-7.5W if
                      idle. Price is around 140€ in Germany.

                      Only points to criticize are 'slow' CPU (800Mhz Marvell Kirkwood 6281)
                      and 'only' 256 MByte of RAM (any ideas how both can be tuned?).

                      Ah yes, applications running on my Debian-QNAP: samba, apache, rsync,
                      squeezebox server, ...

                      Hardy
                    • oddballhero
                      Might as well mention also the ubiquiti nanostation loco m2 which can run OpenWrt just like my trusty NSLU2. Got a good price on mine a while back, less than
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 19, 2011
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                        Might as well mention also the ubiquiti nanostation loco m2 which can run OpenWrt just like my trusty NSLU2. Got a good price on mine a while back, less than $70 (I think you can get it for $50 now). By the way, saw articles about the Foxconn running as a Hackintosh. Put in some leftover parts and now another Debian Machine. Works great.

                        --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph&Maria Finch" <ralphmariafinch@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Foxconn R10-S4
                        >
                        > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012
                        >
                        > Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?
                        >
                        >
                        > - Low power, fanless (reviewer says "draws 35 watts at idle")
                        > - small form factor
                        > - install any OS you like
                        > - 1 internal & 1 external storage bays SATA 3.0Gb/s
                        > - onboard video
                        > - Realtek 8100C(10/100Mbps) LAN
                        > - 2 front 4 rear USB (2.0 I assume)
                        >
                        > I would prefer something a little more stripped and lower power,
                        > nevertheless this seems to be a contender...
                        >
                      • oddballhero
                        Might as well mention another candidate. http://www.genesi-usa.com/products/efika
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 5, 2011
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                          Might as well mention another candidate.
                          http://www.genesi-usa.com/products/efika

                          --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph&Maria Finch" <ralphmariafinch@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Foxconn R10-S4
                          >
                          > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856119012
                          >
                          > Could this be an alternative to our beloved Slug?
                          >
                          >
                          > - Low power, fanless (reviewer says "draws 35 watts at idle")
                          > - small form factor
                          > - install any OS you like
                          > - 1 internal & 1 external storage bays SATA 3.0Gb/s
                          > - onboard video
                          > - Realtek 8100C(10/100Mbps) LAN
                          > - 2 front 4 rear USB (2.0 I assume)
                          >
                          > I would prefer something a little more stripped and lower power,
                          > nevertheless this seems to be a contender...
                          >
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