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Re: problem with startup script on SlugOS BE 4.8

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  • reuter.rudolf
    ... Hello, I have a similar problem. My start script for a Python program is in /etc/init.d/moin.sh. If I start it from the command line it works. The script
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 8, 2009
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      --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "prupertplum" <r.plumridge@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi again
      >
      > Simple one this time. I have created a simple startup script to load
      > snort on start-up, but it never gets executed for some reason.
      >
      > It is simply:
      > #!/bin/sh
      > /opt/bin/snort -c /opt/etc/snort.conf -i eth0
      >
      >
      > Its an executable script in /etc/init.d and I have created a symlink
      > to it at /etc/rc3.d/s99snort and it has the exact same permissions as
      > all the other files in both init.d and rc3.d.
      >
      > But it never loads - well, snort is never shown as running in top. The
      > script works fine if I run it from the command line. So I am a little
      > bit stumped as to why it doesn't load at boot.
      >
      > The only issue I see is that all the other symlinks in rc3.d are
      > replicated in all the other rcX.ds. So do I need to create symlinks in
      > all the rcX.ds for my script to work? According to the wiki, I need
      > only create one symlink in rc3.d since my runlevel is 3....
      >
      > Any views much appreciated...
      >
      Hello,

      I have a similar problem. My start script for a Python program is in
      /etc/init.d/moin.sh. If I start it from the command line it works.
      The script actually starts as I can see from a logging:
      echo "test" | logger
      an read with logread as root.
      I figured out, that the path /opt/bin is not there at boot time, why?

      Help would be very much appeciated, Rudy
    • jl.050877@gmail.com
      ... As for why /opt/bin is missing on boot-up, if it is, I don t know specifically in this case but, in general, it is the Unix philosophy to restrict the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 8, 2009
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        On Thu, Jan 08, 2009 at 05:37:18PM -0000, reuter.rudolf wrote:
        > I have a similar problem. My start script for a Python program is in
        > /etc/init.d/moin.sh. If I start it from the command line it works.
        > The script actually starts as I can see from a logging:
        > echo "test" | logger
        > an read with logread as root.
        > I figured out, that the path /opt/bin is not there at boot time, why?

        As for why /opt/bin is missing on boot-up, if it is, I don't
        know specifically in this case but, in general, it is the Unix
        philosophy to restrict the path, as well as the rest of the
        environment, so as to make it harder for virus/worms/whatever to do
        their tricks to gain control.

        If your analysis is correct, then the solution, if you haven't
        solved it already, is to set the path in the script moin.sh. After
        the initial comments but before any executable lines, add a line
        like:

        export PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin:/opt/bin

        except that you should replace the path I used above with whatever
        is the correct path is on your system for the user who runs moin.sh
        (probably root). From the command prompt as that user, type
        "echo $PATH" and copy the output into the above.

        John
      • reuter.rudolf
        ... Hello John, Thank you for the good explanation of the background. I have implemented your hint, but it did not work unfortunately. Yes, I agree it has
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 9, 2009
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          --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, jl.050877@... wrote:
          >
          > On Thu, Jan 08, 2009 at 05:37:18PM -0000, reuter.rudolf wrote:
          > > I have a similar problem. My start script for a Python program is in
          > > /etc/init.d/moin.sh. If I start it from the command line it works.
          > > The script actually starts as I can see from a logging:
          > > echo "test" | logger
          > > an read with logread as root.
          > > I figured out, that the path /opt/bin is not there at boot time, why?
          >
          > As for why /opt/bin is missing on boot-up, if it is, I don't
          > know specifically in this case but, in general, it is the Unix
          > philosophy to restrict the path, as well as the rest of the
          > environment, so as to make it harder for virus/worms/whatever to do
          > their tricks to gain control.
          >
          > If your analysis is correct, then the solution, if you haven't
          > solved it already, is to set the path in the script moin.sh. After
          > the initial comments but before any executable lines, add a line
          > like:
          >
          > export PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin:/opt/bin
          >
          > except that you should replace the path I used above with whatever
          > is the correct path is on your system for the user who runs moin.sh
          > (probably root). From the command prompt as that user, type
          > "echo $PATH" and copy the output into the above.
          >
          > John
          >
          Hello John,

          Thank you for the good explanation of the background. I have
          implemented your hint, but it did not work unfortunately. Yes, I agree
          it has something to do with the startup routine. It is strange that in
          my script "moin.sh":
          mkdir -m 755 "/var/volatile/www" 2>&1 | logger
          does work (the RAM-disk was created), but not:
          echo $PATH | logger

          At the moment I am trying to figure out in a shell script if
          "/opt/bin" is alread in $PATH. But as it looks like with the new
          "export ..." command, it will not be the cause of the trouble. So I am
          digging deeper into the init process of linux.

          Greetings, Rudi
        • reuter.rudolf
          ... why? ... Hello John, Thank you for the good explanation of the background. At the first try of your hint I fooled myself by mixing up a link with an old
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 9, 2009
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            --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, "reuter.rudolf" <reuterru@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com, jl.050877@ wrote:
            > >
            > > On Thu, Jan 08, 2009 at 05:37:18PM -0000, reuter.rudolf wrote:
            > > I have a similar problem. My start script for a Python program is in
            > > /etc/init.d/moin.sh. If I start it from the command line it works.
            > > The script actually starts as I can see from a logging:
            > > echo "test" | logger
            > > an read with logread as root.
            > > I figured out, that the path /opt/bin is not there at boot time,
            why?
            >
            > As for why /opt/bin is missing on boot-up, if it is, I don't
            > know specifically in this case but, in general, it is the Unix
            > philosophy to restrict the path, as well as the rest of the
            > environment, so as to make it harder for virus/worms/whatever to do
            > their tricks to gain control.
            >
            > If your analysis is correct, then the solution, if you haven't
            > solved it already, is to set the path in the script moin.sh. After
            > the initial comments but before any executable lines, add a line
            > like:
            >
            > export PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin:/opt/bin
            >
            > except that you should replace the path I used above with whatever
            > is the correct path is on your system for the user who runs moin.sh
            > (probably root). From the command prompt as that user, type
            > "echo $PATH" and copy the output into the above.
            >
            > John

            Hello John,

            Thank you for the good explanation of the background. At the first try
            of your hint I fooled myself by mixing up a link with an old shell
            file in /etc/rc3.d. Now I found my error, and voila you are perfectly
            right with the "export PATH ..." statement, that solved my problem.

            Thank you very much for your great help.

            With best regards, Rudy
          • Neil Ronketti
            Hello The List, I have a very simple question, and I rather suspect I m missing something obvious - so apologies if this has been asked before. I m
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 9, 2009
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              </lurk>

              Hello The List,

              I have a very simple question, and I rather suspect I'm missing
              something obvious - so apologies if this has been asked before.

              I'm trying to edit one of the wiki pages at
              http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddUSBOneWireAdapter to give an
              example of a init.d script that can be used to automagically kick
              digitemp into life when the slug is booted. When I try to edit the page,
              I'm prompted for a password, which I don't have.

              So, I go off to look at http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/PmWiki/PmWiki
              and the advice there states: "Getting edit access: If you spot a mistake
              or see an opportunity for improvement on a password-protected page, you
              need to get a password in order to edit the page. Todo: document the
              process for getting such a password."

              Can anyone enlighten me as to how I can add this info? I promise to also
              update the wiki page on how to request such a password :)

              First post. Please be gentle.

              Many thanks,
              nr.
            • Rod Whitby
              The password is on the bottom of the front page of the wiki. -- Rod ... From: Neil Ronketti Date: Saturday, Jan 10, 2009 8:18 am Subject:
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 9, 2009
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                The password is on the bottom of the front page of the wiki.
                -- Rod

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Neil Ronketti <neil@...>
                Date: Saturday, Jan 10, 2009 8:18 am
                Subject: [nslu2-linux] nslu2-linux.org wiki
                To: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.comReply-To: nslu2-linux@yahoogroups.com

                </lurk>
                >
                >Hello The List,
                >
                >I have a very simple question, and I rather suspect I'm missing
                >something obvious - so apologies if this has been asked before.
                >
                >I'm trying to edit one of the wiki pages at
                >http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddUSBOneWireAdapter to give an
                >example of a init.d script that can be used to automagically kick
                >digitemp into life when the slug is booted. When I try to edit the page,
                >I'm prompted for a password, which I don't have.
                >
                >So, I go off to look at http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/PmWiki/PmWiki
                >and the advice there states: "Getting edit access: If you spot a mistake
                >or see an opportunity for improvement on a password-protected page, you
                >need to get a password in order to edit the page. Todo: document the
                >process for getting such a password."
                >
                >Can anyone enlighten me as to how I can add this info? I promise to also
                >update the wiki page on how to request such a password :)
                >
                >First post. Please be gentle.
                >
                >Many thanks,
                >nr.
                >
                >------------------------------------
                >
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                >
                >
                >
                >
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